1

This question already has an answer here:

I have a Controller class with something like this

public void create(int a, int b){
     //do something
}

Now i want to mock the Controller class and call a certain method for exmaple doCustomCreate() when the create Method of my mocked Controller class is called.

My test would ´look something like this

Controller ctrlMock = mock(Controller.class);
//PseudoCode: when(isCalled(ctrlMock.create(a,b)).doCall(doCustomCreate());

I only read about mocking methods with input and return values, so i wondered if this is possible?

Edit: Updated the Question

marked as duplicate by diosney, Jeff Bowman, CoverosGene, BMW, Joe Jan 6 '15 at 10:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    The list is a private field of the mocked object. Why do you care about what it contains? It seems you want the mock to do what it would do if it was not mocked. – JB Nizet Jan 5 '15 at 12:56
  • google "mockito void method", first result – Joeblade Jan 5 '15 at 12:56
  • @JBNizet actually technically it's a package level protected. Thoguh I doubt it's actually used as such in the authors code. – Joeblade Jan 5 '15 at 12:58
  • It seems that you are trying to use a mock for a different purpose than what it's really intended for. Please could you explain a bit more what you want to test? – Ray Jan 5 '15 at 13:01
  • @Ray Why so? I use Mockito for the exact purpose as Mockito was designed. – Gobliins Jan 5 '15 at 13:18
4

Just use this API for void methods :

doAnswer(doCustomCreate()).when(ctrlMock).create(a,b);

Or with BDDMockito :

willAnswer(doCustomCreate()).given(ctrlMock).create(a,b);

Where doCustomCreate() returns an Answer (that returns null). Note I used Void just to indicate this answer don't return anything.

public Answer<Void> doCustomCreate() {
    return new Answer<Void>() {
        public Void answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) {
            // your stuff
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Note giving behavior to a mock is somehow a rocky path for maintainability of tests, as it means the tested component is not tested in pure controlled environment / isolation.

  • This could be what i am looking for, i will try this out. – Gobliins Jan 5 '15 at 14:49
  • @Gobliins I've updated the answer for more complete usage info. – Brice Jan 5 '15 at 14:56
0

So you want to override the mock's behavior for a certain method. The solution for this is using a so-called spy (AKA partial mock) instead of a mock: http://site.mockito.org/mockito/docs/current/org/mockito/Mockito.html#16

  • No, this is the opposite of what i want to do.I don't want to call the real method, for what would i need a mock then? i want to call my own method. If you would replace the 'when(mock.someMethod()).thenCallRealMethod();' by 'when(mock.someMethod()).thenCallMyCustomMethod();' then it would be logical. – Gobliins Jan 5 '15 at 14:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.