10

I want to create a DSL where 2 (foo and bar) functions can be called in succession so that

initialize()
|> foo 10
|> bar "A"
|> foo 20
|> bar "B"
|> transform

this works pretty perfect by defining

type FooResult = FooResult
type BarResult = BarResult

let foo param (result_type:BarResult, result) = (FooResult, transform param result)
let bar param (result_type:FooResult, result) = (BarResult, transform param result)

Now however I want to also allow that multiple bar calls can be executed in succession however foos still have to be called only once

initialize()
|> foo 10
|> bar "A"
//OK
|> bar "B"
|> transform

initialize()
|> foo 10
|> bar "A"
|> foo 20
//should yield an compile error
|> foo 30
|> bar "B"
|> transform

In C# I could overload bar to either accept BarResult or FooResult but that doesnt work for F#. At least not easily. I also tried to create some Discriminate Unions but I really cant get my head around it.

14

This is a fun question!

Your existing code works quite nicely, but I would do one change - you do not actually need to pass around actual FooResult and BarResult values. You can define a type MarkedType<'TPhantom, 'TValue> which represents a value of 'TValue with a special "mark" specified by the other type:

type MarkedValue<'TPhantom, 'TValue> = Value of 'TValue

Then you can use interfaces as type parameters for the phantom type. I found it a bit hard to think about the "results", so I'm going to use inputs instead:

type IFooInput = interface end
type IBarInput = interface end

The trick now is that you can also define an interface that is both IFooInput and IBarInput:

type IFooOrBarInput =
  inherit IFooInput
  inherit IBarInput

So, all you need ot do now is to add appropriate annotations to foo and bar:

let foo param (Value v : MarkedValue<#IFooInput, _>) : MarkedValue<IBarInput, _> = 
  Value 0

let bar param (Value v : MarkedValue<#IBarInput, _>) : MarkedValue<IFooOrBarInput, _> = 
  Value 0

Here, the annotation on the input says that it should accept anything that is or inherits from IFooInput or IBarInput. But the result of the bar function is marked with IFooOrBarInput, which makes it possible to pass it to both foo and bar:

(Value 0 : MarkedValue<IFooInput, _>)
|> foo 10
|> bar "A"
|> bar "A"
|> foo 20
|> bar "B"
  • wow! I must admit I didn't think in terms of interfaces - but even if I did I certainly wouldnt have come up with such a solution. Do you think a solution with discriminate unions would also be possible? – robkuz Jan 5 '15 at 19:57
  • 1
    I'm not sure DUs would work - the key trick here is to use the inheritance relationship between interfaces (where two different types are compatible). I suppose inline and overloading might be an alternative. – Tomas Petricek Jan 5 '15 at 22:16
  • Just one more question. What is the meaning of the hash in MarkedValue<#IBarInput, _>? – robkuz Jan 7 '15 at 6:10
  • The # means anything that is an IBarInput, its the flexible type symbol. – 7sharp9 Jan 7 '15 at 8:08
  • The "0" of Value 0 is not used. Can it the definition of MarkedValue be changed so "0" is not necessary? – ca9163d9 Jan 21 '15 at 18:12

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