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What is the best way to create and use a struct with only one instantiation in the system? Yes, this is necessary, it is the OpenGL subsystem, and making multiple copies of this and passing it around everywhere would add confusion, rather than relieve it.

The singleton needs to be as efficient as possible. It doesn't seem possible to store an arbitrary object on the static area, as it contains a Vec with a destructor. The second option is to store an (unsafe) pointer on the static area, pointing to a heap allocated singleton. What is the most convenient and safest way to do this, while keeping syntax terse.

  • Have you looked at how the existing Rust bindings for OpenGL handle this same problem? – Shepmaster Jan 6 '15 at 3:14
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    Yes, this is necessary, it is the OpenGL subsystem, and making multiple copies of this and passing it around everywhere would add confusion, rather than relieve it. => this is not the definition of necessary, it is maybe convenient (at first) but not necessary. – Matthieu M. Jan 6 '15 at 7:11
  • 2
    Yes you have a point. Although since OpenGL is a big state machine anyway, I am close to certain there will not be a clone of it anywhere, whose use would only result in OpenGL errors. – stevenkucera Jan 7 '15 at 0:37
116

Non-answer answer

Avoid global state in general. Instead, construct the object somewhere early (perhaps in main), then pass mutable references to that object into the places that need it. This will usually make your code easier to reason about and doesn't require as much bending over backwards.

Look hard at yourself in the mirror before deciding that you want global mutable variables. There are rare cases where it's useful, so that's why it's worth knowing how to do.

Still want to make one...?

Using lazy-static

The lazy-static crate can take away some of the drudgery of creating a singleton (below). Here is a global mutable vector:

#[macro_use]
extern crate lazy_static;

use std::sync::Mutex;

lazy_static! {
    static ref ARRAY: Mutex<Vec<u8>> = Mutex::new(vec![]);
}

fn do_a_call() {
    ARRAY.lock().unwrap().push(1);
}

fn main() {
    do_a_call();
    do_a_call();
    do_a_call();

    println!("called {}", ARRAY.lock().unwrap().len());
}

If you remove the Mutex then you have a global singleton without any mutability.

A special case: atomics

If you only need to track an integer value, you can directly use an atomic:

use std::sync::atomic::{AtomicUsize, Ordering};

static CALL_COUNT: AtomicUsize = AtomicUsize::new(0);

fn do_a_call() {
    CALL_COUNT.fetch_add(1, Ordering::SeqCst);
}

fn main() {
    do_a_call();
    do_a_call();
    do_a_call();

    println!("called {}", CALL_COUNT.load(Ordering::SeqCst));
}

Manual, dependency-free implementation

This is greatly cribbed from the Rust 1.0 implementation of stdin. You should also look at the modern implementation of io::Lazy. I've commented inline with what each line does.

use std::sync::{Arc, Mutex, Once, ONCE_INIT};
use std::time::Duration;
use std::{mem, thread};

#[derive(Clone)]
struct SingletonReader {
    // Since we will be used in many threads, we need to protect
    // concurrent access
    inner: Arc<Mutex<u8>>,
}

fn singleton() -> SingletonReader {
    // Initialize it to a null value
    static mut SINGLETON: *const SingletonReader = 0 as *const SingletonReader;
    static ONCE: Once = ONCE_INIT;

    unsafe {
        ONCE.call_once(|| {
            // Make it
            let singleton = SingletonReader {
                inner: Arc::new(Mutex::new(0)),
            };

            // Put it in the heap so it can outlive this call
            SINGLETON = mem::transmute(Box::new(singleton));
        });

        // Now we give out a copy of the data that is safe to use concurrently.
        (*SINGLETON).clone()
    }
}

fn main() {
    // Let's use the singleton in a few threads
    let threads: Vec<_> = (0..10)
        .map(|i| {
            thread::spawn(move || {
                thread::sleep(Duration::from_millis(i * 10));
                let s = singleton();
                let mut data = s.inner.lock().unwrap();
                *data = i as u8;
            })
        })
        .collect();

    // And let's check the singleton every so often
    for _ in 0u8..20 {
        thread::sleep(Duration::from_millis(5));

        let s = singleton();
        let data = s.inner.lock().unwrap();
        println!("It is: {}", *data);
    }

    for thread in threads.into_iter() {
        thread.join().unwrap();
    }
}

This prints out:

It is: 0
It is: 1
It is: 1
It is: 2
It is: 2
It is: 3
It is: 3
It is: 4
It is: 4
It is: 5
It is: 5
It is: 6
It is: 6
It is: 7
It is: 7
It is: 8
It is: 8
It is: 9
It is: 9
It is: 9

This code compiles with Rust 1.23.0. The real implementations of Stdin use some unstable features to attempt to free the allocated memory, which this code does not.

Really, you'd probably want to make SingletonReader implement Deref and DerefMut so you didn't have to poke into the object and lock it yourself.

All of this work is what lazy-static does for you.

The meaning of "global"

Please note that you can still use normal Rust scoping and module-level privacy to control access to a static or lazy_static variable. This means that you can declare it in a module or even inside of a function and it won't be accessible outside of that module / function. This is good for controlling access:

use lazy_static::lazy_static; // 1.2.0

fn only_here() {
    lazy_static! {
        static ref NAME: String = String::from("hello, world!");
    }

    println!("{}", &*NAME);
}

fn not_here() {
    println!("{}", &*NAME);
}
error[E0425]: cannot find value `NAME` in this scope
  --> src/lib.rs:12:22
   |
12 |     println!("{}", &*NAME);
   |                      ^^^^ not found in this scope

However, the variable is still global in that there's one instance of it that exists across the entire program.

  • 45
    After a lot of thought I'm convinced not to use the Singleton, and instead use no global variables at all and pass everything around. Makes the code more self-documenting since it is clear what functions access the renderer. If I want to change back to singleton, it will be easier to do that than the other way around. – stevenkucera Jan 8 '15 at 0:48
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    Thanks for the answer, it helped a lot. I just thought I'd let here a comment to describe what I see as a valid use case for lazy_static!. I am using it to interface to a C application that allows loading/unloading modules (shared objects) and the rust code is one of these modules. I don't see much option than using a global on load because I have no control over main() at all and how the core application interfaces with my module. I basically needed a vector of things that can be added on runtime after my mod is loaded. – Moises Silva Aug 6 '16 at 17:11
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    @MoisesSilva there's always going to be some reason to need a singleton, but it's unnecessary to use it in many of the cases it is used. Without knowing your code, it's possible that the C application should allow each module to return a "user data" void * which is then passed back into each module's methods. This is a typical extension pattern for C code. If the application doesn't allow for this and you cannot change it, then yes, a singleton may be a good solution. – Shepmaster Aug 6 '16 at 17:15
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    @Worik would you care to explain why? I discourage people from doing something that is a poor idea in most languages (even the OP agreed that a global was a bad choice for their application). That's what in general means. I then show two solutions for how to do it anyway. I just tested the lazy_static example in Rust 1.24.1 and it works exactly. There's no external static anywhere here. Perhaps you need to check things on your end to make sure you've understood the answer fully. – Shepmaster May 21 '18 at 21:50
  • 1
    @Worik if you need help with the basics of how to use a crate, I suggest you re-read The Rust Programming Language. The chapter on creating a guessing game shows how to add dependencies. – Shepmaster May 23 '18 at 0:01

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