9

How to make two functions calls f1(2) and f1(1) execute in parallel so that all the program would execute for 2 seconds not for 3.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

// sleeps for `secs` seconds
func f1(secs time.Duration) (result string) {
    fmt.Printf("waiting %V\n", secs)
    time.Sleep(secs * time.Second)
    result = fmt.Sprintf("waited for %d seconds", secs)
    return
}

// prints arg1, arg2
func f2(arg1, arg2 string) {
    fmt.Println(arg1)
    fmt.Println(arg2)
}

// this function executes for 3 seconds, because waits a lot
func runNotParallel() {

    out1 := f1(2)
    out2 := f1(1)
    f2(out1, out2)

}

// golang parallel return functions
// todo: make it run so all the function will executes for 2 seconds not for 3
func runParallel() {
    out1 := f1(2)
    out2 := f1(1)
    f2(out1, out2)
}

func main() {
    runNotParallel()
    runParallel()
}

playground

I guess I can do it only with channels. Should I redefine function f1 or I can leave it as is and change only way I call it?

4
  • 1
    When using parallel execution to speed-up a program, Amdahl's Law is important and will be one of the factors that determine whether you are successful or just wasting your effort. In Go, concurrency has broader aims than just faster execution. It's important enough to be worth learning about though, so I wish you success.
    – Rick-777
    Jan 7, 2015 at 23:11
  • 1
    @Rick-777 Amdahl’s Law is more about parallelism than concurrency: in certain cases where latency is a huge factor (think of I/O-bound operations such as making 100 HTTP requests), concurrency can be a huge improvement. Jun 21, 2020 at 19:14
  • Amdahl's law is quite simple and general - it doesn't care about (or even mention) I/o. Nor does it matter about the difference between parallelism and concurrency; these are widely misunderstood terms anyway.
    – Rick-777
    Jun 22, 2020 at 17:48
  • You can also check this library github.com/ddelizia/channelify (I am the author :) )
    – ddelizia
    Oct 5, 2020 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

16

Use chan/goroutine

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

// sleeps for `secs` seconds
func f1(secs time.Duration) (result string) {
    fmt.Printf("waiting %v\n", secs)
    time.Sleep(secs * time.Second)
    result = fmt.Sprintf("waited for %v seconds", secs)
    return
}

// prints arg1, arg2
func f2(arg1, arg2 string) {
    fmt.Println(arg1)
    fmt.Println(arg2)
}

// this function executes for 3 seconds, because waits a lot
func runNotParallel() {
    out1 := f1(2)
    out2 := f1(1)
    f2(out1, out2)

}

// golang parallel return functions
// todo: make it run so all the function will executes for 2 seconds not for 3
func runParallel() {
    out1 := make(chan string)
    out2 := make(chan string)
    go func() {
        out1 <- f1(2)
    }()
    go func() {
        out2 <- f1(1)
    }()
    f2(<-out1, <-out2)
}

func main() {
    runNotParallel()
    runParallel()
}

https://play.golang.org/p/G4RHiq9LJw

1
  • I made a library that can do what you are doing in few lines with reflection. You can check the example github.com/ddelizia/channelify. The logic behind is the same but I think I made it easier to use :)
    – ddelizia
    Oct 5, 2020 at 16:07
7

Another way you could do it is using WaitGroup

I wrote this utility function to help parallelize a group of functions:

import "sync"

// Parallelize parallelizes the function calls
func Parallelize(functions ...func()) {
    var waitGroup sync.WaitGroup
    waitGroup.Add(len(functions))

    defer waitGroup.Wait()

    for _, function := range functions {
        go func(copy func()) {
            defer waitGroup.Done()
            copy()
        }(function)
    }
}

So in your case, we could do this

value1 := ""
value2 := ""

func1 := func() {
    value1 = f1(2)
}

func2 = func() {
    value2 = f1(1)
}

Parallelize(func1, func2)

f2(out1, out2)

If you wanted to use the Parallelize function, you can find it here https://github.com/shomali11/util

1

here is a solution without channels but with the missing f2 synchronization:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
    "time"
)

// sleeps for `secs` seconds
func f1(secs time.Duration, result *string, sg *sync.WaitGroup) () {
    fmt.Printf("waiting %v\n", secs)
    time.Sleep(secs * time.Second)
    *result = fmt.Sprintf("waited for %d seconds", secs)
    if sg!= nil {
        sg.Done()
    }
    return
}

// prints arg1, arg2
func f2(arg1, arg2 string) {
    fmt.Println(arg1)
    fmt.Println(arg2)
}

// this function executes for 3 seconds, because waits a lot
func runNotParallel() {

    var out1, out2 string
    f1(2, &out1, nil)
    f1(1, &out2,nil)
    f2(out1, out2)

}

// golang parallel return functions
// todo: make it run so all the function will executes for 2 seconds not for 3
func runParallel() {
    var sg sync.WaitGroup
    sg.Add(2)
    var out1, out2 string
    go f1(2, &out1, &sg)
    go f1(1, &out2, &sg)
    sg.Wait()
    f2(out1, out2)
}

func main() {
    runNotParallel()
    runParallel()
}

basically, go operator blocks from using/accessing a return values but it could be done using a pointers for the return place holders in the signature

0

With go 1.18 supporting generics, the channel solution can be made even more readable.

func async[T any](f func() T) chan T {
    ch := make(chan T)
    go func() {
        ch <- f()
    }()
    return ch
}

func main() {
    startTime := time.Now().Local()

    out1 := async(func() string {
        time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
        return "thing 1"
    })
    out2 := async(func() string {
        time.Sleep(2 * time.Second)
        return "thing 2"
    })

    results := []string{<-out1, <-out2}

    fmt.Printf("results: %v\n", results)
    fmt.Printf("took %v", time.Since(startTime))
}

playground

The lo package provides this along with lots of other generic helper functions.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.