17

I would like to know if there are any guidelineswhich a developer should follow as to when (and where) to place locks.

For instance: I understand that code such as this should be locked, to avoid the possibility of another thread changing the value of SomeHeapValue unexpectedly.

class Foo
{
  public SomeHeapObject myObject;
  public void DoSummat(object inputValue_)
  {
    myObject.SomeHeapValue = inputValue_;
  }

}

My question is, however, how deep does one go with the locking? For instance, if we have this code:

class Foo
{
  public SomeHeapObject myObject;
  public void DoSummat(object inputValue_)
  {
    myObject.SomeHeapValue = GetSomeHeapValue();
  }

}

Should we lock in the DoSummat(...) method, or should we lock in the GetSomeHeapValue() method?

Are there any guidelines that you all keep in mind when strcturing multi-threaded code?

23

The best guide for locking and threading I found, is this page (this is the text I consult when working with locking and threading):

http://www.albahari.com/threading/

Yo want the paragraph "Locking and Thread Safety", but read the rest also, it is very well written.

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  • 1
    thanks that is useful...but why do all examples use static member variables? there are issues with thread-safety in class member variables as well, right? – miguel May 6 '10 at 9:28
  • @miguel: it is possible to lock instance member by using "lock(this)", explanation and Example2 on this page provide more details: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c5kehkcz%28VS.71%29.aspx. I think that on Albahari site he is using static because then he does not have to make an instance of a class, which makes his examples shorter. – user218447 May 6 '10 at 11:42
  • @miguel: your lock object needs to be shared across threads to be usable, and static is a clean and easy way to do this. Static is not inherently evil, just misused like the globals of old. – Ed Power May 6 '10 at 16:14
  • Another reason for concentrating on statics, is that there's a simple way to make any instance member free from threading concerns - simply never expose it to more than one thread. This is also the reason while most BCL classes are not thread-safe for instance members except a few classes specifically intended for thread-related tasks - why make everyone pay the cost of making something threadsafe if it might never be used that way, but likewise most BCL classes are threadsafe in static members. – Jon Hanna Aug 22 '12 at 19:12
3
  • Lock as little as possible, but as much as needed.

  • Avoid locks when possible - in .NET 4.0 there are alternatives that are not causing a context switch.

  • Try not to lock multiple times. Structure your API accordingly. For example a queue. DeQueue - make an alternative DeQueue(int amount) that can dequeue many items with one lock.

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