4

I am writing unit tests for a few classes (C++), and came across an issue attempting to write a unit test for the copy constructor and assignment operator. A basic thing that could be wrong with either is that a programmer adds a member to the class and then forgets to update the c'ctor and/or operator=.

I could of course write a unit test along the lines of:

class MyClass()
{
public:

    int a, b;
    non_trivial_copyable nasty;

    MyClass& operator=(const MyClass& _r)
    {
        if(this == &r)
          return *this;
        a = _r.a;
        b = _r.b;
        nasty = acquire_non_trivial_copyable();
    }
};


TEST(My_Class_copy_op)
{
  MyClass m1;
  m1.a = m1.b = 2;

  MyClass m2 = m1;
  VERIFY(m2.a == 2);
  VERIFY(m2.b == 2);
}

Very well. now the programmer adds a member c, but doesn't update the operator and test case.

class MyClass()
{
public:
    float c;
// ...
}

The test case will still merrily succeed, even though the operator is now broken.

Now, we could do the following:

TEST(My_Class_copy_op)
{
// Aha! Fails when programmer forgets to update test case to include checking c
   static_assert(sizeof(MyClass) == 8);
// Meh, also fails on an architecture where the size of MyClass happens to be != 8

   // ...
}

I could not find any good information on how to solve this, but sure someone must have ran into this before!? Is is so obvious that I'm missing it completely!?

  • 2
    The lesson to learn would be that writing code you don't need is an unnecessary potential source of bugs. Just remove the buggy assignment operator. Or provide an example where it is actually needed. – juanchopanza Jan 6 '15 at 19:16
  • 1
    Ok, the classes are of course not that simple. Let's assume there's a member that prevents the implicit copy constructor from doing the right thing. Assume MyClass contains a mutex, for example. – namezero Jan 6 '15 at 19:21
  • 1
    OK. Then go ask the developer why they added a data member without writing the test for it first :-) – juanchopanza Jan 6 '15 at 19:22
  • I was going to suggest implementing operator==() but then realized that would have the same problem as well! :P – Jason Jan 6 '15 at 19:25
  • 2
    You're seem to be asking if there is a mechanism for writing unit tests with validity that is modification-transcendent. Such a condition would seemingly eliminate the need for code reviews, the place where such a divergence would be discovered. I don't know how things are where you work, but at my job the developer is responsible for updating the unit tests affected by code updates. If they don't and the tests fail or pass erroneously, its on their head. – WhozCraig Jan 6 '15 at 19:30
7

Explicitly testing a copy constructor is fine, but it's probably beating around the bush. More often that not, the copy constructor itself is a detail you don't need to explicitly test. What you probably want to do instead is to write a suite of tests that do work on your copied object and make sure that the work comes up with the correct results. Like this:

MyClass a;
// Now initialize a with stuff it needs to do its job

// Copy a into b
MyClass b = a;

// Make b do its job and make sure it succeeds
VERIFY(b.DoWork());
  • Adding on to that approach, you could record the result (or side effects) of a.SomeOperation() and compare that to b.SomeOperation(). Of course, this still only works if the unit test actually tests functionality that uses the new member variable. – Jason Jan 6 '15 at 19:36
  • Right, and as other posters have said, there is no magic bullet that prevents developers from needing to update or write new unit tests. – mbgda Jan 6 '15 at 19:37
  • I'm going to accept this answer, as this seems to be be most sensible way to verify functionality. @mbgda I was just trying to provide a nice "reminder". – namezero Jan 7 '15 at 7:30
  • Alternatively the "nice reminder" could be the code coverage test report. If the code was changed and the unit tests cover less of the code under test, additional tests or extension of exisiting tests is required. Imagine, c member got added but it is never used in any function of the class... Coverage then would not change. But the forgotten code in operator=() would not be able to introduce new bugs. Maybe later, when code starts to use c, lacking coverage would result in adding tests, which would reveal the bug. – BitTickler Jan 7 '15 at 10:21
  • Last not least, static code checkers are your friend. In order to obtain high quality code, unit tests alone are not sufficient. The combination of code coverage assessment, static code checking and instrumentation comes closer to the "ideal". Depriving developers of such opportunities and then declaring it a "human resources" problem (see some of the other comments) is a path which leads to the dark side. – BitTickler Jan 7 '15 at 10:29

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