54

I tried this

SELECT convert(datetime, '23/07/2009', 111)

but got this error

The conversion of a varchar data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range value.

However

SELECT convert(datetime, '07/23/2009', 111)

is OK though

How to fix the 1st one ?

7
  • Have you tried using UTC format 'YYYY-MM-DD' it's a least a consistent approach and not subject to country specific settings. – Lazarus May 6 '10 at 11:33
  • Have you tried storing the date values as epoch timestamps, which are much more easier to handle than strings? – Delan Azabani May 6 '10 at 11:38
  • Epoch time is all but useless for dates after 2037, or before 1903 or so. Almost any function that uses one or works with one expects it to be a signed int (32 bits, 31 either way). You wanna use 64 bits, you risk getting your date's high bits lopped off. – cHao May 6 '10 at 11:40
  • @Delan Azabani, if you are using tsql, there are much better native date and/or time data types than a bigint epoch timestamp. – KM. May 6 '10 at 11:56
  • 1
    All, thanks for your input. However I can just touch the thing that already in DB, not how it was inputted – Sim May 6 '10 at 17:23
111

The last argument of CONVERT seems to determine the format used for parsing. Consult MSDN docs for CONVERT.

111 - the one you are using is Japan yy/mm/dd.

I guess the one you are looking for is 103, that is dd/mm/yyyy.

So you should try:

 SELECT convert(datetime, '23/07/2009', 103)
1
14

Try:

SELECT convert(datetime, '23/07/2009', 103)

this is British/French standard.

0
1

You can convert a string to a date easily by:

CAST(YourDate AS DATE)
1
SELECT COALESCE(TRY_CONVERT(datetime, Value, 111), 
    TRY_CONVERT(datetime, Value, 103), DATEADD(year,-1,GetDate()))

You could add additional date formats as the Coalesce will go through each until it returns a successful Try_Convert

1
  • Very nice solution to the badly designed database problem – Auspex May 25 at 12:37
0
SELECT convert(varchar(10), '23/07/2009', 111)
0
0

SQL Server by default uses the mdy date format and so the below works:

SELECT convert(datetime, '07/23/2009', 111)

and this does not work:

SELECT convert(datetime, '23/07/2009', 111)

I myself have been struggling to come up with a single query that can handle both date formats: mdy and dmy.

However, you should be ok with the third date format - ymd.

1
  • Actually, I don't believe SQL Server uses mdy by default. It uses your server's locale settings. Which, for you, is probably mdy. – Auspex May 25 at 12:41
0
SELECT convert(datetime, '23/07/2009', 103)

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