27

I'm writing a command line tool with Swift and I'm having trouble displaying colors in my shell. I'm using the following code:

println("\033[31;32mhey\033[39;39m")

or even

NSFileHandle.fileHandleWithStandardOutput().writeData("\033[31;32mhey\033[39;39m".dataUsingEncoding(NSASCIIStringEncoding, allowLossyConversion: true)!)

It works when I use a simple echo in php (the text is displayed in green) but is there a reason it doesn't work in a Swift command line tool?

Thanks!

1

6 Answers 6

40

Swift has built in unicode support. This invalidates using of back slash. So that I use color codes with "\u{}" syntax. Here is a println code which works perfectly on terminal.

// \u{001B}[\(attribute code like bold, dim, normal);\(color code)m

// Color codes
// black   30
// red     31
// green   32
// yellow  33
// blue    34
// magenta 35
// cyan    36
// white   37

println("\u{001B}[0;33myellow")

Hope it helps.

3
  • 1
    I doesn't work for me with swift 1.2 programming for iOS, I don't see the colors in the output
    – eliocs
    Jun 29, 2015 at 14:03
  • 2
    The Xcode console doesn't print colors in you don't install the XcodeColors plugin -> github.com/robbiehanson/XcodeColors
    – eliocs
    Jun 29, 2015 at 14:26
  • 1
    Is there a way to have partial colored string and the rest of the string in the default console color? Sep 13, 2017 at 13:49
32

Based on @cyt answer, I've written a simple enum with these colors and also overloaded + operator so you can print using that enum.

It's all up on Github, but it's really that simple:

enum ANSIColors: String {
    case black = "\u{001B}[0;30m"
    case red = "\u{001B}[0;31m"
    case green = "\u{001B}[0;32m"
    case yellow = "\u{001B}[0;33m"
    case blue = "\u{001B}[0;34m"
    case magenta = "\u{001B}[0;35m"
    case cyan = "\u{001B}[0;36m"
    case white = "\u{001B}[0;37m"
    case `default` = "\u{001B}[0;0m"
    
    func name() -> String {
        switch self {
        case .black: return "Black"
        case .red: return "Red"
        case .green: return "Green"
        case .yellow: return "Yellow"
        case .blue: return "Blue"
        case .magenta: return "Magenta"
        case .cyan: return "Cyan"
        case .white: return "White"
        case .default: return "Default"
        }
    }
    
    static func all() -> [ANSIColors] {
        return [.black, .red, .green, .yellow, .blue, .magenta, .cyan, .white]
    }
}

func + (left: ANSIColors, right: String) -> String {
    return left.rawValue + right
}

// END


// Demo:

for c in ANSIColors.all() {
    print(c + "This is printed in " + c.name())
}
2
  • 12
    "\u{001B}[0;0m" to reset to default color.
    – devios1
    Dec 10, 2017 at 19:06
  • 2
    By the way, Swift now provides a CaseIterable protocol, which synthesizes an allCases method for your enum that returns an array of all the cases. It doesn't work for cases with associated values, although it is compatible with cases with raw values. See developer.apple.com/documentation/swift/caseiterable Jun 4, 2020 at 16:12
12

You can use Rainbow if you don't mind using it as a framework.

import Rainbow
print("Red text".red)
print("Yellow background".onYellow)
print("Light green text on white background".lightGreen.onWhite)

https://github.com/onevcat/Rainbow

8

Combining some of @Diego's answer, you can use Swift's new DefaultStringInterpolation structure to extend this decoration into your string literals–

enum ASCIIColor: String {
    case black = "\u{001B}[0;30m"
    case red = "\u{001B}[0;31m"
    case green = "\u{001B}[0;32m"
    case yellow = "\u{001B}[0;33m"
    case blue = "\u{001B}[0;34m"
    case magenta = "\u{001B}[0;35m"
    case cyan = "\u{001B}[0;36m"
    case white = "\u{001B}[0;37m"
    case `default` = "\u{001B}[0;0m"
}

extension DefaultStringInterpolation {
    mutating func appendInterpolation<T: CustomStringConvertible>(_ value: T, color: ASCIIColor) {
        appendInterpolation("\(color.rawValue)\(value)\(ASCIIColor.default.rawValue)")
    }
}
// USAGE:
// "\("only this string will be green!", color: .green)"
1
  • 2
    Thanks for also adding default Jun 11, 2019 at 15:43
4

Expanding upon Diego Freniche's answer we can incorporate the functionality of Rainbow, as referenced in Uncharted Works's Answer, without needing to import the framework itself using a simple String extension:

enum ANSIColor: String {

    typealias This = ANSIColor

    case black = "\u{001B}[0;30m"
    case red = "\u{001B}[0;31m"
    case green = "\u{001B}[0;32m"
    case yellow = "\u{001B}[0;33m"
    case blue = "\u{001B}[0;34m"
    case magenta = "\u{001B}[0;35m"
    case cyan = "\u{001B}[0;36m"
    case white = "\u{001B}[0;37m"
    case `default` = "\u{001B}[0;0m"

    static var values: [This] {
        return [.black, .red, .green, .yellow, .blue, .magenta, .cyan, .white, .default]
    }

    static var names: [This: String] = {
        return [
            .black: "black",
            .red: "red",
            .green: "green",
            .yellow: "yellow",
            .blue: "blue",
            .magenta: "magenta",
            .cyan: "cyan",
            .white: "white",
            .default: "default",
        ]
    }

    var name: String {
        return This.names[self] ?? "unknown"
    }

    static func + (lhs: This, rhs: String) -> String {
        return lhs.rawValue + rhs
    }

    static func + (lhs: String, rhs: This) -> String {
        return lhs + rhs.rawValue
    }

}
extension String {

    func colored(_ color: ANSIColor) -> String {
        return color + self + ANSIColor.default
    }

    var black: String {
        return colored(.black)
    }

    var red: String {
        return colored(.red)
    }

    var green: String {
        return colored(.green)
    }

    var yellow: String {
        return colored(.yellow)
    }

    var blue: String {
        return colored(.blue)
    }

    var magenta: String {
        return colored(.magenta)
    }

    var cyan: String {
        return colored(.cyan)
    }

    var white: String {
        return colored(.white)
    }

}
2

Here is my solution:

struct Colors {
    static let reset = "\u{001B}[0;0m"
    static let black = "\u{001B}[0;30m"
    static let red = "\u{001B}[0;31m"
    static let green = "\u{001B}[0;32m"
    static let yellow = "\u{001B}[0;33m"
    static let blue = "\u{001B}[0;34m"
    static let magenta = "\u{001B}[0;35m"
    static let cyan = "\u{001B}[0;36m"
    static let white = "\u{001B}[0;37m"
}

Demo

print(Colors.yellow + "Please Enter the Output Directory Name:" + Colors.reset)

or

print(Colors.yellow + "Please " + Colors.blue + "Enter " + Colors.magenta + "the Output Directory Name:" + Colors.reset)

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