Why does calling std::move on a const object call the copy constructor when passed to another object? Specifically, the code

#include <iostream>

struct Foo {
    Foo() = default;
    Foo(Foo && x) { std::cout << "Move" << std::endl; }
    Foo(Foo const & x) = delete;
};

int main() {
    Foo const x; Foo y(std::move(x)); 
}

fails to compile with the message:

g++ -std=c++14 test07.cpp -o test07
test07.cpp: In function 'int main()':
test07.cpp:10:36: error: use of deleted function 'Foo::Foo(const Foo&)'
     Foo const x; Foo y(std::move(x)); 
                                    ^
test07.cpp:6:5: note: declared here
     Foo(Foo const & x) = delete;
     ^
Makefile:2: recipe for target 'all' failed
make: *** [all] Error 1

Certainly, I expect it to fail because we can't move a const value. At the same time, I don't understand the route that the code takes before it tries to call the copy constructor. Meaning, I know that std::move converts the element to an x-value, but I don't know how things proceed after that with respect to const.

  • 7
    The constness of the moved object isn't changed, Foo const&& cannot bind to Foo&& so the compiler tries to access the copy constructor, which fails because it is deleted. – user657267 Jan 7 '15 at 2:29
  • 2
    I'm no expert at move operators, but maybe it's that you can call move on a const value, but the result from that can only be accepted into the copy constructor, so the compiler decides to call that. – BWG Jan 7 '15 at 2:29
  • 1
    "Meaning, I know that std::move converts the element to an x-value" Actually, it doesn't. It returns an rvalue reference to the item. – Ben Voigt Jan 7 '15 at 2:57
  • @BenVoigt, what's the difference? [basic.lval] "The result of calling a function whose return type is an rvalue reference to an object type is an xvalue." – Jonathan Wakely Jan 10 '15 at 16:25
  • 1
    @BenVoigt the result of std::move(v) is the result of converting the expression v (which is an lvalue, and an object, but not an lvalue reference because expressions don't have reference type, [expr]/5) to type Foo&& (which is an xvalue) ... I think saying it doesn't convert v to an xvalue is needless pedantry, or just plain wrong. – Jonathan Wakely Jan 10 '15 at 16:41
up vote 36 down vote accepted

The type of the result of calling std::move with a T const argument is T const&&, which cannot bind to a T&& parameter. The next best match is your copy constructor, which is deleted, hence the error.

Explicitly deleteing a function doesn't mean it is not available for overload resolution, but that if it is indeed the most viable candidate selected by overload resolution, then it's a compiler error.

The result makes sense because a move construction is an operation that steals resources from the source object, thus mutating it, so you shouldn't be able to do that to a const object simply by calling std::move.

The type of std::move(x) is Foo const&& which can't bind to Foo&&. The reasoning is the same as for a T const& not being able to bind to a T&. You can, however, have a constructor taking a Foo const&&. Most likely you won't be able to really move the corresponding object's data but, e.g., in your example there no data, i.e., the following code works OK:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo {
    Foo() = default;
    Foo(Foo &&) { std::cout << "Move\n"; }
    Foo(Foo const&&) { std::cout << "Move const\n"; }
    Foo(Foo const &) = delete;
};

int main() {
    Foo const x; Foo y(std::move(x)); 
}

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