4

I am looking to use boost::asio to read from a 12 digit keypad. I currently can do it without boost, this way:

fd = open ("/dev/input/event0", 0_NONBLOCK);
read (fd, &ev, sizeof ev);

Do you know how I could do this with boost::asio? I am using Linux and c++. This post and this post are useful. I would not use serial port port (io, "/dev/usb/hiddev0") because its not serial, right?

Thank you.

  • I could open the device, get a file descriptor, then use that in asio I think – xinthose Jan 7 '15 at 17:08
  • 2
    Boost.Asio provides modern C++ interfaces, but in its implementation it uses plain C (or OS) functions. So, first of all, it's worth understanding why the above read doesn't work. What behavior do you observe? – Igor R. Jan 7 '15 at 19:28
  • 1
    Highly relevant: consider using a library instead of going to the raw device: stackoverflow.com/a/25559167/85371 – sehe Jan 7 '15 at 19:34
  • @IgorR. I cannot open the device this way: serial_port port (io, "/dev/usb/hiddev0"); I think I should use stream_descriptor – xinthose Jan 7 '15 at 19:38
5

On my system, event2 represents the mouse, and the following simple readloop program works like a charm.

Run as root:

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/posix/stream_descriptor.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

#include <iostream>      // for debug output
#include <iomanip>

#include <linux/input.h> // for input_event
#include <boost/range/adaptor/sliced.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

using namespace boost::asio;

struct input {
    using error_code = boost::system::error_code;
    using sliced = boost::adaptors::sliced;

    input(const char* devspec) : svc(), sd(svc, open(devspec, O_RDONLY)) {
        readloop(); // post work
    }

    void run() {
        svc.run();
    }

  private:
    io_service svc;
    posix::stream_descriptor sd;

    std::vector<input_event> events;

    void handle_input(error_code ec, size_t bytes_transferred) {
        if (!ec) {
            auto const n = bytes_transferred / sizeof(input_event);

            for (auto& ev : events | sliced(0,n)) {
                using namespace boost::posix_time;

                ptime ts({1970,1,1}, seconds(ev.time.tv_sec) + microsec(ev.time.tv_usec));

                std::cout << std::dec << ts.time_of_day() << "\t" << std::hex 
                          << std::hex << ev.type << " " << ev.code  << " " << ev.value << "\n";
            }

            std::cout << "\n";

            readloop();
        } else {
            std::cerr << ec.message() << "\n";
        }
    }

    void readloop() {
        events.resize(32);
        sd.async_read_some(buffer(events), boost::bind(&input::handle_input, this, placeholders::error, placeholders::bytes_transferred));
    }

};

int main()
{
    input monitor("/dev/input/event2");
    monitor.run();
}

Typical output:

22:33:09.705346 2 0 ffffffff
22:33:09.705346 2 1 1
22:33:09.705346 0 0 0

22:33:09.713412 2 0 ffffffff
22:33:09.713412 2 1 1
22:33:09.713412 0 0 0

22:33:09.721308 2 0 ffffffff
22:33:09.721308 0 0 0

22:33:09.729328 2 0 ffffffff
22:33:09.729328 0 0 0

22:33:09.737346 2 1 1
22:33:09.737346 0 0 0

22:33:09.745328 2 0 ffffffff
22:33:09.745328 2 1 1
22:33:09.745328 0 0 0

22:33:11.897301 4 4 90001
22:33:11.897301 1 110 1
22:33:11.897301 0 0 0

22:33:12.065294 4 4 90001
22:33:12.065294 1 110 0
22:33:12.065294 0 0 0
  • 1
    You should probably not accept it as "the solution" until you tried it :) – sehe Jan 7 '15 at 20:45
  • 1
    I've updated to actually decode the events, printing friendly µs timestamps and event batches. (This is a poster-child for how Asio transparently uses a vector of POD structs as a write buffer.) – sehe Jan 7 '15 at 22:35
  • 1
    Possibly date_time. (You could contrast with the first version perhaps) – sehe Jan 8 '15 at 14:57
  • 1
    Looks like all the include dirs are redundant /usr/include/ is on it. So g++ -x c++ -std=c++11 -g -Wall -m32 -c asio_event_reader.cc -o asio_event_reader.o makes more sense typically. – sehe Jan 8 '15 at 15:13
  • 1
    @xinthose The loop just loops through the events vector. The events | sliced(0,n) expression takes the first n elements (namely, the number of events transferred). You could write this as the more traditional for loop for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) { auto& ev = events[i]; } – sehe May 31 '16 at 16:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.