63

I know this has been answered before, but it seems that executing the script directly "python filename.py" does not work. I have Python 2.6.2 on SuSE Linux.

Code:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from multiprocessing import Pool
p = Pool(1)
def f(x):
    return x*x
p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])

Command line:

> python example.py
Process PoolWorker-1:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/process.py", line 231, in _bootstrap
    self.run()
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/process.py", line 88, in run
    self._target(*self._args, **self._kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 57, in worker
    task = get()
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/queues.py", line 339, in get
    return recv()
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'f'
123

Restructure your code so that the f() function is defined before you create instance of Pool. Otherwise the worker cannot see your function.

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(x):
    return x*x

p = Pool(1)
p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])
  • 9
    awesome, thank you so much!! What cryptic usage! – gatoatigrado May 7 '10 at 0:21
  • 1
    NOTE: A few years later, I've started writing an imap alternative [ github.com/gatoatigrado/vimap ], which makes this mistake more difficult (and makes it clear when threads are forked). – gatoatigrado Jun 13 '13 at 22:29
  • 1
    @Bartosz, Do you have any idea why this is not a problem in ipython notebooks? – Framester Oct 7 '14 at 9:33
  • @Framester: Odds are, ipython notebooks are using a "spawn" like approach to multiprocessing, rather than a "fork" based approach. The spawn based approach is to either launch a fresh process and import the main module (but not as __main__, to prevent it doing the if __name__ == '__main__:` stuff), or pickle interpreter state to transmit to child. fork semantics are faster, but only work on a single machine, and not on Windows. Spawn semantics can be made to work anywhere (e.g. Windows w/o fork), and can work on a cluster, and ipython notebooks are intended for multimachine cases. – ShadowRanger Apr 18 '16 at 17:16
5

This one works:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(x):
    return x*x

if __name__ == "__main__":
    p = Pool(1)
    p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])

I'm not 100% sure why your code does not work, but I guess the reason is that child processes launched by the multiprocessing module try to import the main module (to have access to the methods you defined), and the if __name__ == "__main__" stanza is required not to execute the initialization code where you set up your pool.

  • If one has to run such code through an interpreter on Windows is there any work around? This is the situation I'm confronted with doing some Python-Fu programming from the Gimp Python Console plugin. – jxramos Mar 12 '15 at 2:40
  • This one did not work for me – Dang Manh Truong Nov 4 '17 at 11:07
  • @Tamás, it does not work for me either, from multiprocessing import Pool, ImportError: cannot import name Pool – Houy Narun May 29 '18 at 6:31
1

One possibility is that your python file has the same name as a module:

  • test.py
  • test/
    • __init__.py

in pickle.py, you have the error coming from:

    def find_class(self, module, name):
      # Subclasses may override this
      __import__(module)
      mod = sys.modules[module] # <- here mod will reference your test/__init__.py
      klass = getattr(mod, name)
      return klass
1

The problem I had was solved by using if __name__ == "__main__" as pointed out by Tamás; in Eclipse for Windows the examples do not work under the interpreter. This is explained in http://docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing

1

This comes from the fact that with p = Pool(1) the main process forks processes (threads vs processes) before it creates the function f. As stated in Bartosz answer the spawned processes do not have access to the new function.

def f1(x):
    ...

p = Pool(1) # p is spawned and is now an independent process, knows f1

def f(x): # p doesn't not share this object
    ...

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