79

The default Identity provider provided in ASP.NET 5 has very strict password rules by default, requiring a lower case character, an upper case character, a non-alphanumeric character, and a number. I am looking for a way to change the password requirements for the provider.

Previously in ASP.NET 4, the provider could be configured via the Web.config XML file, as previously answered. However ASP.NET 5 uses the new code based configuration pattern and it is unclear how to configure the identity.

How can I change the password requirements for my application?

1
147

I actually ended up figuring this out, it turns out you need to supply AddDefaultIdentity with a suitable lambda expression that configures the IdentityOptions it provides. This is done inside the ConfigureServices method within the Startup class, like so:

public class Startup {
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {

        // Add Identity services to the services container.
        services.AddDefaultIdentity<ApplicationIdentityDbContext, ApplicationUser, IdentityRole>(Configuration,
            o => {
                o.Password.RequireDigit = false;
                o.Password.RequireLowercase = false;
                o.Password.RequireUppercase = false;
                o.Password.RequireNonLetterOrDigit = false;
                o.Password.RequiredLength = 7;
            });
    }
}

Update 2:

The above was true in the beta1 versions of the framework, in the latest rc1 beta5 it has changed slightly to:

services.AddIdentity<ApplicationUser, IdentityRole>(o => {
    // configure identity options
    o.Password.RequireDigit = false;
    o.Password.RequireLowercase = false;
    o.Password.RequireUppercase = false;
    o.Password.RequireNonAlphanumeric = false;
    o.Password.RequiredLength = 6;
})
.AddEntityFrameworkStores<ApplicationIdentityDbContext>()
.AddDefaultTokenProviders();
8
  • 5
    Yep or you can just directly call services.ConfigureIdentity(o => { });
    – Hao Kung
    Jan 10 '15 at 9:37
  • 2
    Nice! Do you think it's possible via the config.json file? May 8 '15 at 8:56
  • 1
    @DaveVandenEynde I just tried. Did not work. json below. "Identity": { "Password": { "RequireDigit": "false", "RequireLowercase": "false", "RequiredLength": "5", "RequireUppercase": "false", "RequireNonLetterOrDigit": "false" } } May 28 '15 at 18:15
  • From what I'm learning about MVC 6 I think that it's up to the programmer to make thinks configurable by reading it explicitly from config in the startup of the app. May 29 '15 at 13:46
  • 1
    Also have a look at this solution to set options after initialization: stackoverflow.com/a/30942723/1507481 Jul 2 '15 at 9:25
28

If you have set up a new Web project with Individual User Accounts go to:

App_Start -> IdentityConfig.cs

There you can edit the following defaults:

manager.PasswordValidator = new PasswordValidator
{
    RequiredLength = 6,
    RequireNonLetterOrDigit = true,
    RequireDigit = true,
    RequireLowercase = true,
    RequireUppercase = true,
};
11

in startup.cs:

   services.AddIdentity<ApplicationUser, IdentityRole>(x =>
        {
            x.Password.RequiredLength = 6;
            x.Password.RequireUppercase = false;
            x.Password.RequireLowercase = false;
            x.Password.RequireNonAlphanumeric = false;
        }).AddEntityFrameworkStores<ApplicationDbContext>().AddDefaultTokenProviders();
2
  • This is the answer for Core 2.0. Thanks. Jun 12 '18 at 19:11
  • Seems like a lot of hassle to disable those things. Is there anyway to just disable the validation altogether at once? I mean, I do not want to enforce anything, and let the user choose the password on his own. If he gets hacked because he chose a dumb password like "1234", it is his problem. Oct 7 '21 at 17:42
8

What I wanted to do was to customize the password rule so that it should contain characters from at least 2 of the following groups: lower case, upper case, digits and special symbols.

This is not something that I could do by just changing PasswordValidator options:

manager.PasswordValidator = new PasswordValidator
{
    RequiredLength = 6,
    RequireNonLetterOrDigit = false,
    RequireDigit = false,
    RequireLowercase = false,
    RequireUppercase = false,
 };

So instead I created a custom validator by extending IIdentityValidator...

First, create a new file CustomPasswordValidator.cs in your Extensions folder:

public class CustomPasswordValidator : IIdentityValidator<string>
{
    public int RequiredLength { get; set; }
    public CustomPasswordValidator(int length) {
        RequiredLength = length;
    }

    /* 
     * logic to validate password: I am using regex to count how many 
     * types of characters exists in the password
     */
    public Task<IdentityResult> ValidateAsync(string password) {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(password) || password.Length < RequiredLength)
        {
            return Task.FromResult(IdentityResult.Failed(
                $"Password should be at least {RequiredLength} characters"));
        }

        int counter = 0;
        List<string> patterns = new List<string>();
        patterns.Add(@"[a-z]");                                          // lowercase
        patterns.Add(@"[A-Z]");                                          // uppercase
        patterns.Add(@"[0-9]");                                          // digits
        // don't forget to include white space in special symbols
        patterns.Add(@"[!@#$%^&*\(\)_\+\-\={}<>,\.\|""'~`:;\\?\/\[\] ]"); // special symbols

        // count type of different chars in password
        foreach (string p in patterns)
        {
            if (Regex.IsMatch(password, p))
            {
                counter++;
            }
        }

        if (counter < 2)
        {
            return Task.FromResult(IdentityResult.Failed(
                "Please use characters from at least two of these groups: lowercase, uppercase, digits, special symbols"));
        }

        return Task.FromResult(IdentityResult.Success);
    }
}

Then go to IdentityConfig.cs, and initialize it in Create method:

manager.PasswordValidator = new CustomPasswordValidator(8 /*min length*/);
        /*
        // You don't need this anymore
        manager.PasswordValidator = new PasswordValidator
        {
            RequiredLength = 6,
            RequireNonLetterOrDigit = true,
            RequireDigit = true,
            RequireLowercase = true,
            RequireUppercase = true,
        };
        */

See my tutorial for more details.

1
  • 2
    I feel like this is the best solution for the user. This allows a reasonable level of security with giving the user flexibility. Rather than turning on or off certain restrictions, this allows the user to pick what they want with their password. May 29 '18 at 17:16

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