38

We have found that we have several spots in our code where concurrent reads of data protected by a mutex are rather common, while writes are rare. Our measurements seem to say that using a simple mutex seriously hinders the performance of the code reading that data. So what we would need is a multiple-read/single-write mutex. I know that this can be built atop of simpler primitives, but before I try myself at this, I'd rather ask for existing knowledge:

What is an approved way to build a multiple-read/single-write lock out of simpler synchronization primitives?

I do have an idea how to make it, but I'd rather have answers unbiased by what I (probably wrongly) came up with. (Note: What I expect is an explanation how to do it, probably in pseudo code, not a full-fledged implementation. I can certainly write the code myself.)

Caveats:

  • This needs to have reasonable performance. (What I have in mind would require two lock/unlock operations per access. Now that might not be good enough, but needing many of them instead seems unreasonable.)

  • Commonly, reads are more numerous, but writes are more important and performance-sensitive than reads. Readers must not starve writers.

  • We are stuck on a rather old embedded platform (proprietary variant of VxWorks 5.5), with a rather old compiler (GCC 4.1.2), and boost 1.52 – except for most of boost's parts relying on POSIX, because POSIX isn't fully implemented on that platform. The locking primitives available basically are several kind of semaphores (binary, counting etc.), on top of which we have already created mutexes, conditions variables, and monitors.

  • This is IA32, single-core.

  • "This needs to have reasonable performance" - so does a regular mutex have "reasonable performance"? Why not? – sehe Jan 23 '15 at 8:50
  • 1
    @sehe: When, under the hood of such an implementation, a reader needs to lock and release three mutexes in order to access the data, then that is unreasonable performance. – sbi Jan 23 '15 at 8:54
  • "Proprietary version of VxWorks" - what platform - IA32, IA64 or another VxWorks-supported platform (PPC/ARM/etc)? – frasnian Jan 25 '15 at 15:40
  • @frasnian: This is IA32. – sbi Jan 25 '15 at 18:57
  • @sbi as part of your dev tools do you have WindView? It's a very cool graphical way to see exactly what's going on in your system, might help find out where the performance is going in the first place. Think ftrace (or dtrace), but a whole heap better. – bazza Jan 27 '15 at 22:33
13
+500

It seems like you only have mutex and condition_variable as synchronization primitives. therefore, I write a reader-writer lock here, which starves readers. it uses one mutex, two conditional_variable and three integer.

readers - readers in the cv readerQ plus the reading reader
writers - writers in cv writerQ plus the writing writer
active_writers - the writer currently writing. can only be 1 or 0.

It starve readers in this way. If there are several writers want to write, readers will never get the chance to read until all writers finish writing. This is because later readers need to check writers variable. At the same time, the active_writers variable will guarantee that only one writer could write at a time.

class RWLock {
public:
    RWLock()
    : shared()
    , readerQ(), writerQ()
    , active_readers(0), waiting_writers(0), active_writers(0)
    {}

    void ReadLock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(shared);
        while( waiting_writers != 0 )
            readerQ.wait(lk);
        ++active_readers;
        lk.unlock();
    }

    void ReadUnlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(shared);
        --active_readers;
        lk.unlock();
        writerQ.notify_one();
    }

    void WriteLock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(shared);
        ++waiting_writers;
        while( active_readers != 0 || active_writers != 0 )
            writerQ.wait(lk);
        ++active_writers;
        lk.unlock();
    }

    void WriteUnlock() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(shared);
        --waiting_writers;
        --active_writers;
        if(waiting_writers > 0)
            writerQ.notify_one();
        else
            readerQ.notify_all();
        lk.unlock();
    }

private:
    std::mutex              shared;
    std::condition_variable readerQ;
    std::condition_variable writerQ;
    int                     active_readers;
    int                     waiting_writers;
    int                     active_writers;
};
  • Actually, all we have is semaphores, the rest is built atop of them. (Also, we don't have C++11/14's synchronization stuff, but that I file under "pseudo code".) Anyway, this looks pretty much like what I had in mind, only you show that it only needs a mutex for managing the lock's data, and none for actually accessing the data. Thanks for this one, it's definitely a bonus candidate! – sbi Jan 24 '15 at 9:30
  • @sbi yeah. I will change that. good catch. – qqibrow Jan 24 '15 at 18:23
  • @sbi. One improvement I could think is to give more privilege to late writers.When writer come, put it in the front of the mutex queue. In this way, you use a deque as the underlying data structure in the mutex. Then every time calling unlock, the writer will get out first even if it come late. – qqibrow Jan 24 '15 at 18:59
  • 1
    However, note that we had considerable problems making us give the bonus to an answer that sports code which cannot even decide whether it uses pre-increment (because that's better) or post-increment (because that's traditional), whether to use braces or not for single-line condition bodies, explicitly unlocks locks shortly because they go out of scope, and has other style issues, too. I am tempted to clean up this mess just to prevent others thinking bad of me because I knighted code which is that bad. For a C++ programmer, this truly is awfully bad code. – sbi Jan 30 '15 at 9:54
  • 1
    @sbi Thank you for accepting my answer. However, even though I just stepped into industry, I don't think my code is "awfully bad". anyway, feel free to change the code and I can see where to improve. – qqibrow Jan 30 '15 at 17:55
20

At first glance I thought I recognized this answer as the same algorithm that Alexander Terekhov introduced. But after studying it I believe that it is flawed. It is possible for two writers to simultaneously wait on m_exclusive_cond. When one of those writers wakes and obtains the exclusive lock, it will set exclusive_waiting_blocked = false on unlock, thus setting the mutex into an inconsistent state. After that, the mutex is likely hosed.

N2406, which first proposed std::shared_mutex contains a partial implementation, which is repeated below with updated syntax.

class shared_mutex
{
    mutex    mut_;
    condition_variable gate1_;
    condition_variable gate2_;
    unsigned state_;

    static const unsigned write_entered_ = 1U << (sizeof(unsigned)*CHAR_BIT - 1);
    static const unsigned n_readers_ = ~write_entered_;

public:

    shared_mutex() : state_(0) {}

// Exclusive ownership

    void lock();
    bool try_lock();
    void unlock();

// Shared ownership

    void lock_shared();
    bool try_lock_shared();
    void unlock_shared();
};

// Exclusive ownership

void
shared_mutex::lock()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lk(mut_);
    while (state_ & write_entered_)
        gate1_.wait(lk);
    state_ |= write_entered_;
    while (state_ & n_readers_)
        gate2_.wait(lk);
}

bool
shared_mutex::try_lock()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lk(mut_, try_to_lock);
    if (lk.owns_lock() && state_ == 0)
    {
        state_ = write_entered_;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

void
shared_mutex::unlock()
{
    {
    lock_guard<mutex> _(mut_);
    state_ = 0;
    }
    gate1_.notify_all();
}

// Shared ownership

void
shared_mutex::lock_shared()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lk(mut_);
    while ((state_ & write_entered_) || (state_ & n_readers_) == n_readers_)
        gate1_.wait(lk);
    unsigned num_readers = (state_ & n_readers_) + 1;
    state_ &= ~n_readers_;
    state_ |= num_readers;
}

bool
shared_mutex::try_lock_shared()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lk(mut_, try_to_lock);
    unsigned num_readers = state_ & n_readers_;
    if (lk.owns_lock() && !(state_ & write_entered_) && num_readers != n_readers_)
    {
        ++num_readers;
        state_ &= ~n_readers_;
        state_ |= num_readers;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

void
shared_mutex::unlock_shared()
{
    lock_guard<mutex> _(mut_);
    unsigned num_readers = (state_ & n_readers_) - 1;
    state_ &= ~n_readers_;
    state_ |= num_readers;
    if (state_ & write_entered_)
    {
        if (num_readers == 0)
            gate2_.notify_one();
    }
    else
    {
        if (num_readers == n_readers_ - 1)
            gate1_.notify_one();
    }
}

The algorithm is derived from an old newsgroup posting of Alexander Terekhov. It starves neither readers nor writers.

There are two "gates", gate1_ and gate2_. Readers and writers have to pass gate1_, and can get blocked in trying to do so. Once a reader gets past gate1_, it has read-locked the mutex. Readers can get past gate1_ as long as there are not a maximum number of readers with ownership, and as long as a writer has not gotten past gate1_.

Only one writer at a time can get past gate1_. And a writer can get past gate1_ even if readers have ownership. But once past gate1_, a writer still does not have ownership. It must first get past gate2_. A writer can not get past gate2_ until all readers with ownership have relinquished it. Recall that new readers can't get past gate1_ while a writer is waiting at gate2_. And neither can a new writer get past gate1_ while a writer is waiting at gate2_.

The characteristic that both readers and writers are blocked at gate1_ with (nearly) identical requirements imposed to get past it, is what makes this algorithm fair to both readers and writers, starving neither.

The mutex "state" is intentionally kept in a single word so as to suggest that the partial use of atomics (as an optimization) for certain state changes is a possibility (i.e. for an uncontended "fast path"). However that optimization is not demonstrated here. One example would be if a writer thread could atomically change state_ from 0 to write_entered then he obtains the lock without having to block or even lock/unlock mut_. And unlock() could be implemented with an atomic store. Etc. These optimizations are not shown herein because they are much harder to implement correctly than this simple description makes it sound.

  • Does the flaw you cite really qualify as a flaw given that the requirement here is only to allow a single writer? – Jerry Coffin Jan 26 '15 at 16:05
  • I admittedly haven't put the time in for a complete analysis. At the very least I can see a possibility where this second waiting writer is hidden from readers, and thus readers can starve it. Or by "single writer", do you mean only one writer thread? If that is a requirement, I missed that one. The algorithm in my answer can have many reader threads, many writer threads, lets many readers get the lock, or a single writer get the lock, and starves none. – Howard Hinnant Jan 26 '15 at 16:15
  • I originally thought it meant there was only a single writer thread, but after rereading the question, I'm a lot less certain of that. – Jerry Coffin Jan 26 '15 at 16:20
  • @Jerry: I have just found a spot in the code where there are many writers/producers, but only one reader/consumer... :( – sbi Jan 27 '15 at 7:37
  • 1
    @sbi The advantage of this one is that it does not starve writer threads.If you have a steady stream of readers with the other algorithm no writer will ever acquire the lock. This algorithm seems immune to that. – Voo Feb 15 '16 at 8:01
4

Concurrent reads of data protected by a mutex are rather common, while writes are rare

That sounds like an ideal scenario for User-space RCU:

URCU is similar to its Linux-kernel counterpart, providing a replacement for reader-writer locking, among other uses. This similarity continues with readers not synchronizing directly with RCU updaters, thus making RCU read-side code paths exceedingly fast, while furthermore permitting RCU readers to make useful forward progress even when running concurrently with RCU updaters—and vice versa.

  • And that can be used one a platform from the 90s which doesn't even support POSIX? – sbi Jan 23 '15 at 11:03
  • @sbi That is right. You can check it out and see if it builds and works. – Maxim Egorushkin Jan 23 '15 at 11:04
  • I don't think I will introduce a until now totally unknown library to this codebase if a well-written rw-lock would do. (We're doing fault-sensitive stuff.) – sbi Jan 23 '15 at 21:46
  • 1
    @sbi The idea behind RCU is pretty simple and straightforward. Readers use an atomic instruction to read a pointer. Writers atomically update the pointer to a new value. The only difficulty is disposing of an old value and there are several ways of doing it, this is what those white papers explore at lengths. – Maxim Egorushkin Jan 24 '15 at 0:06
  • 1
    @sbi: atomic operations aren't usually in an OS API - the IA32 has the machine opcodes, and if you don't want to compile/link some assembler look for C++ compiler intrinsics/builtins or inline assembly. Google quickly turns up the CPU instructions - e.g. here – Tony Delroy Jan 27 '15 at 8:03
3

There's some good tricks you can do to help.

First, good performance. VxWorks is notable for its very good context switch times. Whatever the locking solution you use it will likely involve semaphores. I wouldn't be afraid of using semaphores (plural) for this, they're pretty well optimsed in VxWorks, and the fast context switch times help mimimise the degradation in performance from assessing many semaphore states, etc.

Also I would forget using POSIX semaphores, which are simply going to be layered on top of VxWork's own semaphores. VxWorks provices native counting, binary and mutex semaphores; using the one that suits makes it all a bit faster. The binary ones can be quite useful sometimes; posted to many times, never exceed the value of 1.

Second, writes being more important than reads. When I've had this kind of requirement in VxWorks and have been using a semaphore(s) to control access, I've used task priority to indicate which task is more important and should get first access to the resource. This works quite well; literally everything in VxWorks is a task (well, thread) like any other, including all the device drivers, etc.

VxWorks also resolves priority inversions (the kind of thing that Linus Torvalds hates). So if you implement your locking with a semaphore(s), you can rely on the OS scheduler to chivvy up lower priority readers if they're blocking a higher priority writer. It can lead to much simpler code, and you're getting the most of the OS too.

So a potential solution is to have a single VxWorks counting semaphore protecting the resource, initialised to a value equal to the number of readers. Each time a reader wants to read, it takes the semaphore (reducing the count by 1. Each time a read is done it posts the semaphore, increasing the count by 1. Each time the writer wants to write it takes the semaphore n (n = number of readers) times, and posts it n times when done. Finally make the writer task of higher priority than any of the readers, and rely on the OS fast context switch time and priority inversion.

Remember that you're programming on a hard-realtime OS, not Linux. Taking / posting a native VxWorks semaphore doesn't involve the same amount of runtime as a similar act on Linux, though even Linux is pretty good these days (I'm using PREEMPT_RT nowadays). The VxWorks scheduler and all the device drivers can be relied upon to behave. You can even make your writer task the highest priority in the whole system if you wish, higher even than all the device drivers!

To help things along, also consider what it is that each of your threads are doing. VxWorks allows you to indicate that a task is/isn't using the FPU. If you're using native VxWorks TaskSpawn routines instead of pthread_create then you get an opportunity to specify this. What it means is that if your thread/task isn't doing any floating point maths, and you've said as such in your call to TaskSpawn, the context switch times will be even faster because the scheduler won't bother to preserve / restore the FPU state.

This stands a reasonable chance of being the best solution on the platform you're developing on. It's playing to the OS's strengths (fast semaphores, fast context switch times) without introducing a load of extra code to recreate an alternate (and possibly more elegant) solution commonly found on other platforms.

Third, stuck with old GCC and old Boost. Basically I can't help there other than low value suggestions about phoning up WindRiver and discussing buying an upgrade. Personally speaking when I've been programming for VxWorks I've used VxWork's native API rather than POSIX. Ok, so the code hasn't be very portable, but it has ended up being fast; POSIX is merely layer on top of the native API anyway and that will always slow things down.

That said, POSIX counting and mutex semaphores are very similar to VxWork's native counting and mutex semaphores. That probably means that the POSIX layering isn't very thick.

General Notes About Programming for VxWorks

Debugging I always sought to use the development tools (Tornado) available for Solaris. This is by far the best multi-threaded debugging environment I've ever come across. Why? It allows you to start up multiple debug sessions, one for each thread/task in the system. You end up with a debug window per thread, and you are individually and independently debugging each one. Step over a blocking operation, that debug window gets blocked. Move mouse focus to another debugging window, step over the operation that will release the block and watch the first window complete its step.

You end up with a lot of debug windows, but it's by far the best way to debug multi-threaded stuff. It made it veeeeery easy to write really quite complex stuff and see problems. You can easily explore the different dynamic interactions in your application because you had simple and all powerful control over what each thread is doing at any time.

Ironically the Windows version of Tornado didn't let you do this; one miserable single debug windows per system, just like any other boring old IDE such as Visual Studio, etc. I've never seen even modern IDEs come anywhere close to being as good as Tornado on Solaris for multi-threaded debugging.

HardDrives If your readers and writers are using files on disk, consider that VxWorks 5.5 is pretty old. Things like NCQ aren't going to be supported. In this case my proposed solution (outlined above) might be better done with a single mutex semaphore to stop multiple readers tripping over each other in their struggle to read different parts of the disk. It depends on what exactly your readers are doing, but if they're reading contiguous data from a file this would avoid thrashing the read/write head to and fro across the disk surface (very slow).

In my case I was using this trick to shape traffic across a network interface; each task was sending a different sort of data, and the task priority reflected the priority of the data on the network. It was very elegant, no message was ever fragmented, but the important messages got the lions share of the available bandwidth.

  • Thanks, there's some very good advice in there (like considering counting semaphores). However, we cannot switch platform, and this is VxWorks 5.5, which is, I believe, from 1996. It only has very little POSIX stuff implemented, no threads (no memory protection between tasks), and it's married to the platform we're bound to. (That's where "proprietary version" comes in.) Calling Windriver won't help and the hardware manufacturer won't upgrade. Nevertheless, the counting semaphore idea alone makes this a very helpful answer. Any critique for that? – sbi Jan 27 '15 at 7:23
  • @sbi, no worries; Yes, VxWorks 5.5. is from around about 1996. In essence everything is a thread; every task can see every other task's global symbols. Makes it very fast at context switching, because there's less to do with the MMU when doing the switch. Purely for the sake of interest VxWorks 6 did introduce memory protection. BTW what CPU platform is this? PowerPC? – bazza Jan 27 '15 at 7:27
  • @sbi, note that my proposed solution doesn't need a platform change. There are counting semaphores in VxWorks 5.5. Also please disregard my question about using PowerPC. I note from another of your posts that you're using IA32. – bazza Jan 27 '15 at 8:03
  • These boxes have flash drives. When we have to write lots of data, we use a separate task for this, because write times, though good on average, can show very bad spikes. (I was told this is inherit to flash drives.) Data mostly comes in and goes out via CAN, Modbus, Profibus, or Profinet, all handled in their own tasks, and we haven't found principal problems with our solutions there. I have found that the best way to debug heavily parallel applications is through good tracing. That we have. – sbi Jan 29 '15 at 10:10
  • After pouring over this with a colleague, he pointed out that, since a counting semaphore cannot be taken from n times in one operation, your proposed algorithm using them would not just, say, become ineffective, but deadlock, as soon as more than one writer enters the scene. That is pretty bad. So, if there is only ever one writer, and that can safely be expressed in the code, so that the code wouldn't compile when another is introduced, a simply counting semaphore is a beautiful solution. Otherwise, however, I'd rather not create this hell for maintenance programmers. – sbi Jan 30 '15 at 9:31
2

As always the best solution will depend on details. A read-write spin lock may be what you're looking for, but other approaches such as read-copy-update as suggested above might be a solution - though on an old embedded platform the extra memory used might be an issue. With rare writes I often arrange the work using a tasking system such that the writes can only occur when there are no reads from that data structure, but this is algorithm dependent.

  • I have briefly looked at this. It seems to depend on atomics, which I don't think we have available. Also, IIUC, "spinning" means to wait busily. In a realtime environment, this you must not do, because it consumes CPU, starving tasks of lower priority. So, thanks for the suggestion, but I think this isn't what we need. – sbi Jan 24 '15 at 9:25
  • Spin locks can use less CPU when locks are only briefly held, since there is a cost to context switching (the CPU state needs to be saved/restored). It's possible your mutexes already do a spinlock followed by a backoff standard mutex, so you may already be covered by using those. However if performance is your goal, then test and measurement should be performed to check. If you're unsure about atomic support on your system, I'd look this up. – Doug Binks Jan 25 '15 at 11:16
  • Thanks for the explanation! We're unsure because looking up didn't reveal anything. – sbi Jan 25 '15 at 11:47
  • 1
    I advise against using spinlocks in VxWorks. Not sure it even implements them. Given the age of the platform I wouldn't be entirely surprised if the hardware @sbi is using is single core. – bazza Jan 27 '15 at 8:07
  • 1
    @sbi Spinlocks on a single core really do mean that nothing else is running until the spinlock is preempted for some other reason. Gets you nowhere. The whole point of VxWork's fast scheduler is that you can use 'proper' things like semaphores with almost the same performance as something like a spinlock, yet be able to do multi-threaded things too. – bazza Jan 27 '15 at 22:09
1

One algorithm for this based on semaphores and mutexes is described in Concurrent Control with Readers and Writers; P.J. Courtois, F. Heymans, and D.L. Parnas; MBLE Research Laboratory; Brussels, Belgium.

  • That's a very interesting paper, and I have learned that CS papers from before the 80s are basically impossible to prove wrong. However, the reader-starving variant of this paper uses quite a number of resources, and all the answers I gathered here so far are far from being that expensive. (Mind you, this could still mean those elders were right and everybody else here has it wrong. I am just not seeing where they are.) – sbi Jan 27 '15 at 7:29
  • Well, after a week it seems there _are_simpler approaches. The ones posted by qqibrow, Howard, and QuestionC are very similar, and use less resources. So I am not picking this answer. – sbi Jan 30 '15 at 9:32
  • This might be a good solution (havent read it), but it is a link only answer. – mjs Apr 10 '15 at 15:34
0

This is a simplified answer based on my Boost headers (I would call Boost an approved way). It only requires Condition Variables and Mutexes. I rewrote it using Windows primitives because I find them descriptive and very simple, but view this as Pseudocode.

This is a very simple solution, which does not support things like mutex upgrading, or try_lock() operations. I can add those if you want. I also took out some frills like disabling interrupts that aren't strictly necessary.

Also, it's worth checking out boost\thread\pthread\shared_mutex.hpp (this being based on that). It's human-readable.

class SharedMutex {
  CRITICAL_SECTION m_state_mutex;
  CONDITION_VARIABLE m_shared_cond;
  CONDITION_VARIABLE m_exclusive_cond;

  size_t shared_count;
  bool exclusive;

  // This causes write blocks to prevent further read blocks
  bool exclusive_wait_blocked;

  SharedMutex() : shared_count(0), exclusive(false)
  {
    InitializeConditionVariable (m_shared_cond);
    InitializeConditionVariable (m_exclusive_cond);
    InitializeCriticalSection (m_state_mutex);
  }

  ~SharedMutex() 
  {
    DeleteCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    DeleteConditionVariable (&m_exclusive_cond);
    DeleteConditionVariable (&m_shared_cond);
  }

  // Write lock
  void lock(void)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    while (shared_count > 0 || exclusive)
    {
      exclusive_waiting_blocked = true;
      SleepConditionVariableCS (&m_exclusive_cond, &m_state_mutex, INFINITE)
    }
    // This thread now 'owns' the mutex
    exclusive = true;

    LeaveCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
  }

  void unlock(void)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    exclusive = false;
    exclusive_waiting_blocked = false;
    LeaveCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    WakeConditionVariable (&m_exclusive_cond);
    WakeAllConditionVariable (&m_shared_cond);
  }

  // Read lock
  void lock_shared(void)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    while (exclusive || exclusive_waiting_blocked)
    {
      SleepConditionVariableCS (&m_shared_cond, m_state_mutex, INFINITE);
    }
    ++shared_count;
    LeaveCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
  }

  void unlock_shared(void)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    --shared_count;

    if (shared_count == 0)
    {
      exclusive_waiting_blocked = false;
      LeaveCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
      WakeConditionVariable (&m_exclusive_cond);
      WakeAllConditionVariable (&m_shared_cond);
    }
    else
    {
      LeaveCriticalSection (&m_state_mutex);
    }
  }
};

Behavior

Okay, there is some confusion about the behavior of this algorithm, so here is how it works.

During a Write Lock - Both readers and writers are blocked.

At the end of a Write Lock - Reader threads and one writer thread will race to see which one starts.

During a Read Lock - Writers are blocked. Readers are also blocked if and only if a Writer is blocked.

At the release of the final Read Lock - Reader threads and one writer thread will race to see which one starts.

This could cause readers to starve writers if the processor frequently context switches over to a m_shared_cond thread before an m_exclusive_cond during notification, but I suspect that issue is theoretical and not practical since it's Boost's algorithm.

  • It seems this would block writers until I all readers are done, right? – sbi Jan 23 '15 at 22:35
  • Yes. But readers can not starve writers because the exclusive_waiting_blocked flag prevents further readers from starting up. – QuestionC Jan 23 '15 at 22:56
  • while (shared_count > 0 ... is where readers block writers – QuestionC Jan 23 '15 at 23:01
  • 1
    This looks like it is probably the same algorithm as described here: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2007/… Which is what the boost implementation was derived from. And this was derived from an old newsgroup posting by Alexander Terekhov. Its main feature is that it gives neither readers nor writers priority. When nothing has the mutex and a reader and a writer simultaneously hit the mutex, the OS decides which one gets in first. When a single writer gets in, it waits for all existing readers to exit, and no new readers can get in. Nobody starves. – Howard Hinnant Jan 24 '15 at 19:15
  • 2
    Studied it. I do not believe this is the Terekhov two-gait algorithm. Adding an answer... – Howard Hinnant Jan 25 '15 at 19:33
0

Now that Microsoft has opened up the .NET source code, you can look at their ReaderWRiterLockSlim implementation.

I'm not sure the more basic primitives they use are available to you, some of them are also part of the .NET library and their code is also available.

Microsoft has spent quite a lot of time on improving the performance of their locking mechanisms, so this can be a good starting point.

  • I have very briefly looked at this. This seems to use a dozen or two member variables, and therefore is everything but lightweight. I did not look much further. – sbi Jan 30 '15 at 10:00

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