203

I have the following structure:

FormEditor - holds multiple FieldEditor FieldEditor - edits a field of the form and saving various values about it in it's state

When a button is clicked within FormEditor, I want to be able to collect information about the fields from all FieldEditor components, information that's in their state, and have it all within FormEditor.

I considered storing the information about the fields outside of FieldEditor's state and put it in FormEditor's state instead. However, that would require FormEditor to listen to each of it's FieldEditor components as they change and store their information in it's state.

Can't I just access the children's state instead? Is it ideal?

  • 4
    "Can't I just access the children's state instead? Is it ideal?" No. State is something internal and should not leak to the outside. You could implement accessor methods for your component, but even that is not ideal. – Felix Kling Jan 9 '15 at 16:55
  • @FelixKling Then you're suggesting that the ideal way for child to parent communication is only events? – Moshe Revah Jan 9 '15 at 18:37
  • 3
    Yes, events is one way. Or have a one directional data flow like Flux promotes: facebook.github.io/flux – Felix Kling Jan 9 '15 at 18:40
  • 1
    If you are not going to use FieldEditors separately, saving their state in FormEditor sounds good. If this is the case, your FieldEditor instances will render based on props passed by their form editor, not their state. A more complex but flexible way would be to make a serializer that goes through any container children and finds all FormEditor instances among them and serializes them into a JSON object. The JSON object can be optionally nested (more than one level) based on the instances' nesting levels in the form editor. – Meglio Jan 24 '16 at 13:03
  • 4
    I think the React Docs 'Lifting State Up' is probably the most 'Reacty' way of doing this – icc97 May 11 '17 at 14:08
126

If you already have onChange handler for the individual FieldEditors I don't see why you couldn't just move the state up to the FormEditor component and just pass down a callback from there to the FieldEditors that will update the parent state. That seems like a more React-y way to do it, to me.

Something along the line of this perhaps:

class FieldEditor extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
  }

  handleChange(event) {
    const text = event.target.value;
    this.props.onChange(this.props.id, text);
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div className="field-editor">
        <input onChange={this.handleChange} value={this.props.value} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class FormEditor extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {};

    this.handleFieldChange = this.handleFieldChange.bind(this);
  }

  handleFieldChange(fieldId, value) {
    this.setState({ [fieldId]: value });
  }

  render() {
    const fields = this.props.fields.map(field => (
      <FieldEditor
        key={field}
        id={field}
        onChange={this.handleFieldChange}
        value={this.state[field]}
      />
    ));

    return (
      <div>
        {fields}
        <div>{JSON.stringify(this.state)}</div>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

// Convert to class component and add ability to dynamically add/remove fields by having it in state
const App = () => {
  const fields = ["field1", "field2", "anotherField"];

  return <FormEditor fields={fields} />;
};

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.body);

http://jsbin.com/qeyoxobixa/edit?js,output

Edit: just for the heck of it I've re-written the above example using hooks for anyone that's interested:

const FieldEditor = ({ value, onChange, id }) => {
  const handleChange = event => {
    const text = event.target.value;
    onChange(id, text);
  };

  return (
    <div className="field-editor">
      <input onChange={handleChange} value={value} />
    </div>
  );
};

const FormEditor = props => {
  const [values, setValues] = useState({});
  const handleFieldChange = (fieldId, value) => {
    setValues({ ...values, [fieldId]: value });
  };
  const fields = props.fields.map(field => (
    <FieldEditor
      key={field}
      id={field}
      onChange={handleFieldChange}
      value={values[field]}
    />
  ));

  return (
    <div>
      {fields}
      <pre>{JSON.stringify(values, null, 2)}</pre>
    </div>
  );
};

// To add abillity to dynamically add/remove fields keep the list in state
const App = () => {
  const fields = ["field1", "field2", "anotherField"];

  return <FormEditor fields={fields} />;
};

  • 2
    This is useful for onChange, but not as much in onSubmit. – 190290000 Ruble Man Jul 26 '17 at 13:21
  • 1
    @190290000RubleMan I'm not sure what you mean, but since the onChange handlers on the individual fields make sure that you always have the complete form data available in your state in your FormEditor component, your onSubmit would just include something like myAPI.SaveStuff(this.state);. If you elaborate a bit more, maybe I can give you a better answer :) – Markus-ipse Jul 26 '17 at 13:31
  • Say I have a form with 3 fields of different type, each with its own validation. I'd like to validate each of them before submitting. If validation fails, each field that has an error should rerender. I haven't figured out how to do this with your proposed solution, but perhaps there is a way! – 190290000 Ruble Man Jul 26 '17 at 13:40
  • 1
    @190290000RubleMan Seems like a different case than the original question. Open a new question with more details and perhaps some sample code, and I can have a look later :) – Markus-ipse Jul 26 '17 at 13:53
  • You might find this answer useful: it uses state hooks, it covers where the state should be created, how to avoid form re-render on every keystroke, how to do field validation, etc. – Andrew Nov 21 '19 at 0:21
177

Just before I go into detail about how you can access the state of a child component, please make sure to read Markus-ipse's answer regarding a better solution to handle this particular scenario.

If you do indeed wish to access the state of a component's children, you can assign a property called ref to each child. There are now two ways to implement references: Using React.createRef() and callback refs.

Using React.createRef()

This is currently the recommended way to use references as of React 16.3 (See the docs for more info). If you're using an earlier version then see below regarding callback references.

You'll need to create a new reference in the constructor of your parent component and then assign it to a child via the ref attribute.

class FormEditor extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.FieldEditor1 = React.createRef();
  }
  render() {
    return <FieldEditor ref={this.FieldEditor1} />;
  }
}

In order to access this kind of ref, you'll need to use:

const currentFieldEditor1 = this.FieldEditor1.current;

This will return an instance of the mounted component so you can then use currentFieldEditor1.state to access the state.

Just a quick note to say that if you use these references on a DOM node instead of a component (e.g. <div ref={this.divRef} />) then this.divRef.current will return the underlying DOM element instead of a component instance.

Callback Refs

This property takes a callback function that is passed a reference to the attached component. This callback is executed immediately after the component is mounted or unmounted.

For example:

<FieldEditor
    ref={(fieldEditor1) => {this.fieldEditor1 = fieldEditor1;}
    {...props}
/>

In these examples the reference is stored on the parent component. To call this component in your code, you can use:

this.fieldEditor1

and then use this.fieldEditor1.state to get the state.

One thing to note, make sure your child component has rendered before you try to access it ^_^

As above, if you use these references on a DOM node instead of a component (e.g. <div ref={(divRef) => {this.myDiv = divRef;}} />) then this.divRef will return the underlying DOM element instead of a component instance.

Further Information

If you want to read more about React's ref property, check out this page from Facebook.

Make sure you read the "Don't Overuse Refs" section that says that you shouldn't use the child's state to "make things happen".

Hope this helps ^_^

Edit: Added React.createRef() method for creating refs. Removed ES5 code.

  • 5
    Also neat little tidbit, you can call functions from this.refs.yourComponentNameHere. I've found it useful for changing state via functions. Example: this.refs.textInputField.clearInput(); – Dylan Pierce Sep 9 '15 at 14:19
  • 7
    Beware (from the docs): Refs are a great way to send a message to a particular child instance in a way that would be inconvenient to do via streaming Reactive props and state. They should, however, not be your go-to abstraction for flowing data through your application. By default, use the Reactive data flow and save refs for use cases that are inherently non-reactive. – Lynn Jul 20 '16 at 12:28
  • 2
    I only get state that was defined inside constructor (not up to date state) – Vlado Pandžić Oct 21 '16 at 11:12
  • 3
    Using refs now is classed as using 'Uncontrolled Components' with the recommendation to use 'Controlled Components' – icc97 May 11 '17 at 23:03
  • Is it possible to do this if the child component is a Redux connected component? – jmancherje Mar 20 '18 at 19:50
4

Now You can access the InputField's state which is the child of FormEditor .

Basically whenever there is a change in the state of the input field(child) we are getting the value from the event object and then passing this value to the Parent where in the state in the Parent is set.

On button click we are just printing the state of the Input fields.

The key point here is that we are using the props to get the Input Field's id/value and also to call the functions which are set as attributes on the Input Field while we generate the reusable child Input fields.

class InputField extends React.Component{
  handleChange = (event)=> {
    const val = event.target.value;
    this.props.onChange(this.props.id , val);
  }

  render() {
    return(
      <div>
        <input type="text" onChange={this.handleChange} value={this.props.value}/>
        <br/><br/>
      </div>
    );
  }
}       


class FormEditorParent extends React.Component {
  state = {};
  handleFieldChange = (inputFieldId , inputFieldValue) => {
    this.setState({[inputFieldId]:inputFieldValue});
  }
  //on Button click simply get the state of the input field
  handleClick = ()=>{
    console.log(JSON.stringify(this.state));
  }

  render() {
    const fields = this.props.fields.map(field => (
      <InputField
        key={field}
        id={field}
        onChange={this.handleFieldChange}
        value={this.state[field]}
      />
    ));

    return (
      <div>
        <div>
          <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Click Me</button>
        </div>
        <div>
          {fields}
        </div>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

const App = () => {
  const fields = ["field1", "field2", "anotherField"];
  return <FormEditorParent fields={fields} />;
};

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, mountNode);
  • 6
    Not sure I can upvote this one. What do you mention here that isn't already answered by @Markus-ipse ? – Alexander Bird Nov 30 '18 at 23:06

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