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I have a python script that uses multiprocessing.pool.map to do some work. As it goes it prints things to stdout, for errors it prints to stderr. I decided it would be nice to have a separate log file for each of the streams and after a bit of thinking worked out that I should run it like this:

time ./ecisSearch.py 58Ni.conf 4 1 > >(tee stdout.log) 2> >(tee stderr.log >&2)

This gives me the log files and preserves the output on the appropriate streams. However here comes the problem. If I run it without the redirects I get this:

$ time ./ecisSearch.py 58Ni.conf 4 1

2015-01-09 14:42:37.524333: This job will perform 4 fit(s)   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:42:37.524433: Threaded mapping of the fit function onto the starting point input set is commencing   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:42:37.526641: Starting run #: 0   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:42:37.527018: Starting run #: 1   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:42:37.529124: Starting run #: 2   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:42:37.529831: Starting run #: 3   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:42:54.052522: Test of std err writing in run 0 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:42:54.502284: Test of std err writing in run 1 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:42:59.952433: Test of std err writing in run 3 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:43:03.259783: Test of std err writing in run 2 is finished   //this is stderr

2015-01-09 14:43:03.260360: Finished fits in job #: 1 preparing to output data to file   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:43:03.275472: Job finished   //this is stdout


real    0m26.001s
user    0m44.145s
sys 0m32.626s

However, running it with the redirects generates the following output.

$ time ./ecisSearch.py 58Ni.conf 4 1 > >(tee stdout.log) 2> >(tee stderr.log >&2)
2015-01-09 14:55:13.188230: Test of std err writing in run 0 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:55:13.855079: Test of std err writing in run 1 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:55:19.526580: Test of std err writing in run 3 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:55:23.628807: Test of std err writing in run 2 is finished   //this is stderr
2015-01-09 14:54:56.534790: Starting run #: 0   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:54:56.535162: Starting run #: 1   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:54:56.538952: Starting run #: 3   //this is stdout
2015-01-09 14:54:56.563677: Starting run #: 2   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:54:56.531837: This job will perform 4 fit(s)   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:54:56.531912: Threaded mapping of the fit function onto the starting point input set is commencing   //this is stdout


2015-01-09 14:55:23.629427: Finished fits in job #: 1 preparing to output data to file   //this is stdout

2015-01-09 14:55:23.629742: Job finished   //this is stdout


real    0m27.376s
user    0m44.661s
sys 0m33.295s

Just looking at the time stamps we can see something strange is happening here. Not only are the stderr and stdout streams not interspersed with each other as they should be, but the stdout component seems to have stuff from the sub-processes first and then stuff from the 'master' process, regardless of the order it appeared in. I know that stderr is unbuffered and stdout is buffered, but that does not explain why the stdout information is out of order within its own stream. Also, not apparent from my posting, is the fact that all the stdout waited until the end of execution to appear on the screen.

My questions are as follows: Why is this happening? and, less importantly Is there a way to fix it?

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  • Buffering. stderr is unbuffered, that's why those show up first, then I'm guessing the other lines stay in a buffer and are flushed when their process finishes. Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/15931526/…. Not sure why those redirects make a difference, but that's a good place to look. – Lack Jan 9 '15 at 20:12
  • Care to explain the out of order nature of the stdout though? If it was just stderr vs stdout buffering would have been my choice of explanation too. But as I said further down in the question it is not just that. The stdout components are not in the correct order either. Only the parts that say "Test of std err writing" are written to stderr the rest is stdout and there is stuff that time stamps tell us was written first to stdout that appeared later. – James Matta Jan 9 '15 at 20:20
  • The unordered lines on stdout are from different subprocesses, right? Each has its own buffer. This seems like a pretty good explanation (not Python-specific): pixelbeat.org/programming/stdio_buffering – Lack Jan 9 '15 at 20:26
  • It looks like, the suggested question with an already existent answer seemed to have the solution. After sprinkling some carefully placed sys.stdout(stderr).flush() throughout the code it seems to work perfectly now. What do I do now? Close the question? Wait for a replicated answer? Answer it myself? – James Matta Jan 9 '15 at 20:46
  • Actually, though I had flagged as duplicate, there is a slight difference because you ask about why it happens when redirecting, but not otherwise. I'm writing a brief answer to that – Lack Jan 9 '15 at 20:47
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The output to stdout is buffered: that is, print statements actually write to a buffer, and this buffer is only occassionally flushed to the terminal. Each process has a separate buffer, which is why writes from different processes can appear out of order (This is a common problem, as in Why subprocess stdout to a file is written out of order?)

In this case, the output is in order, but appears out of order when it is redirected. Why? This article explains:

  • stdin is always buffered
  • stderr is always unbuffered
  • if stdout is a terminal then buffering is automatically set to line buffered, else it is set to buffered

So, when output was going to a terminal, it was flushing every line, and happened to appear in order. When redirecting, a long buffer is used (typically 4096 bytes). Since you printed less than that, whichever subprocess finished first was flushed first.

The solution is to use flush(), or entirely disable buffering for the process (see Disable output buffering)

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  • Thanks again for helping me figure this out. I had suspected buffering as the culprit for stderr vs stdout but hadn't thought of buffering being responsible for the weirdness in the stdout of the sub-processes vs the master process. I bet if I had been testing on something other than a tiny input set it might have been more obvious. – James Matta Jan 9 '15 at 21:19

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