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In a dynamic generated table (i.e. number of col. is variable), and on a particular row, I want it to span the whole row.

Instead of counting the number cols being used, I use some random large number for colspan, are there any drawback?

 <table class="table">
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>#</th>
      <th>col 1</th>
      <th>col 2</th>
      <th>col 3</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="2">no enough colspan</td>
    </tr>       
    <tr>
      <td colspan="9999"> should cover the whole row no matter the no. of col. </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

http://www.bootply.com/ot3l8CrJQ9

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  • 3
    If you're dynamically generating the table anyway, why is it so hard to just count the number of columns? This seems to me like a solution (more a hack) looking for a problem, while potentially creating unnecessary problems in itself.
    – BoltClock
    Jan 10 '15 at 9:33
  • Why is this tagged with twitter-bootstrap and twitter-bootstrap-3? Jan 10 '15 at 9:42
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There are several drawbacks. If the markup specifies columns that do not actually exist (there are no cells starting in them), it violates the HTML table model. This may lead to many kinds of oddities. For example, MDN says that “Values higher than 1000 will be considered as incorrect and will be set to the default value (1).” This is not based on the spec, but at least Firefox does so; so your colspan="9999" is taken as colspan="1". Some other browser might set a lower limit, so dropping the value to 1000 does not necessarily help.

“Fake columns” also cause problems in styling. Suppose that at some point you, or someone else working on the page you created, wants to have fixed table layout, dividing the available space evenly to columns. This fails when colspan has created fake columns, since they are counted in the allocation:

table {
  width: 100%;
  table-layout: fixed;
}
<table border>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>#</th>
      <th>col 1</th>
      <th>col 2</th>
      <th>col 3</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="4">Covers all the 4 columns.</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

<p>Even division fails when there are fake columns:

<table border>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>#</th>
      <th>col 1</th>
      <th>col 2</th>
      <th>col 3</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="9">should cover the whole row no matter the no. of col.</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

<p>It fails even worse if you have used a very large `colspan` value “for safety”:

<table border>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>#</th>
      <th>col 1</th>
      <th>col 2</th>
      <th>col 3</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td colspan="999">should cover the whole row no matter the no. of col.</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

According to HTML 4.01, colspan="0" should (in a simple case like this) means making the value equal to the number of all columns. However, only Firefox has implemented this.

The conclusion is that your code that generates the table should count the columns and put the correct specific number into the colspan attribute.

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