17

Julia appears to have a lot of Matlab like features. I'd like to select from an array using a predicate. In Matlab I can do this like:

>> a = 2:7 ;
>> a > 4

ans =

     0     0     0     1     1     1

>> a(a>4)

ans =

     5     6     7

I found a kind of clunky seeming way to do part of this in Julia:

julia> a = 2:7
2:7

julia> [int(x > 3) for x in a]
6-element Array{Any,1}:
 0
 0
 1
 1
 1
 1

(Using what wikipedia calls list comprehension). I haven't figured out how to apply a set like this to select with in Julia, but may be barking up the wrong tree. How would one do a predicate selection from an array in Julia?

27

You can use a very Matlab-like syntax if you use a dot . for elementwise comparison:

julia> a = 2:7
2:7

julia> a .> 4
6-element BitArray{1}:
 false
 false
 false
  true
  true
  true

julia> a[a .> 4]
3-element Array{Int32,1}:
 5
 6
 7

Alternatively, you can call filter if you want a more functional predicate approach:

julia> filter(x -> x > 4, a)
3-element Array{Int32,1}:
 5
 6
 7
  • 1
    For the record it looks like the elementwise method is about twice as fast as calling filter. – Peeter Joot Jan 11 '15 at 16:14
12

Array comprehension in Julia is somewhat more primitive than list comprehension in Haskell or Python. There are two solutions — you can either use a higher-order filtering function, or use broadcasting operations.

Higher-order filtering

filter(x -> x > 4, a)

This calls the filter function with the predicate x -> x > 4 (see Anonymous functions in the Julia manual).

Broadcasting and indexing

a[Bool[a[i] > 4 for i = 1:length(a)]]

This performs a broadcasting comparision between the elements of a and 4, then uses the resulting array of booleans to index a. It can be written more compactly using a broadcasting operator:

a[a .> 4]
  • 1
    I have an array and would like to filter it on more than one thing. For example a > 3 && a < 5. However when I try to do this I get the error that non-boolean (BitArray{1}) used in boolean context. What is the problem here? – lara Apr 21 '16 at 23:37
  • This works fine with filter: filter( x -> (x > 3 && x < 5), a) docs.julialang.org/en/latest/stdlib/collections/… – Fred Schoen May 3 '16 at 8:50
  • 1
    And for arrays, you have to use bitwise operators a .> 3 & a .< 5 Notice the single & for bitwise and – Fred Schoen May 3 '16 at 8:59
  • 1
    Note that a=[1; 2; 3]; a[a.>0 & a.<1] will not yield the expected result! This gives 1 2 3, as the & operator has higher precedence. A correct solution is a[(a.>0) & (a.<1)]. – esel Jul 13 '16 at 11:49
0

To filter the keys in a dictionary, this worked for me:

mydict = Dict("key1" => 1.0, "key2" => 2.0, "a big string with a part of a string" => 3.0)
filter(x -> occursin("part of a string", string(x)), keys(mydict))

Here is what the output looks like on the REPL in Julia 1.0

julia> mydict = Dict("key1" => 1.0, "key2" => 2.0, "a big string with a part of a string" => 3.0)
Dict{String,Float64} with 3 entries:
  "key2"                                 => 2.0
  "key1"                                 => 1.0
  "a big string with a part of a string" => 3.0

julia> filter(x -> occursin("part of a string", string(x)), keys(mydict))
Set(["a big string with a part of a string"])

This in general is a great way to filter an array of strings.

Hope that helps.

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