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I'm trying to figure out how does PHP load arrays to memory and when does passing an array consume memory.

So I’ve got this little bit of code running: note that the input array is less important in this example:

<?php

echo $this->getMemoryUsage();
$arr = $query->result_array(); // array of arrays from codeigniter
echo $this->getMemoryUsage();

This consumes exactly 250 kB of memory, this means the array is roughly 250 kB in size, roughly.

So I ran the following code:

<?php

echo $this->getMemoryUsage();
$arr = $query->result_array(); // array of arrays from codeigniter

$arr[0]['id'] = 'changing this value';

$foo = $arr;
$foo[2]['id'] = 'changing this value again';

$bar = $foo;
$bar[4]['id'] = 'changing this value again and again';

$far = $bar;
$far[5]['id'] = 'changing this value again and again and again';

echo $this->getMemoryUsage();

According to what I read and was told, PHP doesn’t actually copy the array, it only references the original array, but once a change is made PHP has to copy the entire array.

Imagine my surprise when the above code consumes exactly 500 kB of RAM.

Can anyone explain what’s going on here?

Just to be clear, all these indices (0–5 and id) already exist in the original array, I’m just modifying the value. The original value is some integer.

EDIT

Just to clear the involvement of $this->result(); Here's another test I've conducted :

    echo $this->getMemoryUsage();
    $arr = $query->result_array(); // array of arrays from codeigniter
//$arr[0]['id'] = 'changing this value';

    $foo = $arr;
    $foo[2]['id'] = 'changing this value again';

    //$bar = $foo;
    //$bar[4]['id'] = 'changing this value again and again';
    //
    //$far = $bar;
    //$far[4]['id'] = 'changing this value again and again and again';

    echo $this->getMemoryUsage();

This time the output is exactly 250 kB - Just like the original trial without any changes

EDIT #2

As requested, I've ran the code from here on my setup, to make sure results are consistent : http://pastebin.com/cYNg4cg7

These are the results :

DECLARATION: 4608 kB
FINAL: 8904 kB
DIFF TO DECLARATION: 4296 kB

So even though the declaration was 4608 and the array was passed and changed 4 times, it's still only less than doubled the memory footprint.

EDIT #3

I've ran the memory changes after each allocation :

DECLARATION: 5144 kB
allocating A0 added : 144 kB
allocating A1 added : 1768 kB
allocating A2 added : 1768 kB
allocating A3 added : 1768 kB
FINAL: 10744 kB
DIFF TO DECLARATION: 5600 kB

Each following operation after the first costs exactly the same, which seems to indicate the exact same size is being copied. This seems to support Austin's answer, The only thing that doesn't add up now is the size that's allocated, But that's a different question .

Seems like Austin's on the ball, I'll accept it if no other answer comes by.

  • Very tough question, you may be interested in the following article I read a few days ago: nikic.github.io/2011/12/12/… – Fleshgrinder Jan 11 '15 at 18:10
  • I've read that article a few weeks ago, It's honestly fascinating, But doesn't explain how copying works exactly. – Patrick Jan 11 '15 at 18:14
  • 2
    I know, just thought you might like it. I can't answer your question and I can't give you a link that might answer your question. Instead I starred your question so I can follow it and will give it a bounty if no answer is posted, since I'd love to know this as well. :) – Fleshgrinder Jan 11 '15 at 18:17
  • I would be very interested to know more about what is happening under the hood. On a related note, if you are concerned about the memory usage of "arrays" (really hash tables) you can use SplFixedArray to get a "true" array: php.net/manual/en/class.splfixedarray.php – Mathew Tinsley Jan 11 '15 at 18:21
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    Does the array really consume 250Kb, or could that be overhead from the call as well (stuff that is allocated by the result_array() method, and is not (yet) cleaned up). To be sure, I would make a new copy of the array and measure the difference before and after that copy, although that will also not be completely waterproof. – GolezTrol Jan 11 '15 at 18:30
4

Here's what I think is going on:

PHP arrays are copy on write as you say, but each level of a multi-dimensional array is separately copy on write. PHP is very smart about reusing parts of a multi-dimensional array and not just the whole thing. (This is similar to some file systems that support snapshots, like ZFS.)

Example: say we have this array

$x = array('foo' => array(1, 2, 3), 'bar' => array(4, 5, 6));

This is stored in memory not as a single chunk, but as separate chunks here labeled A, B, C, and $x:

array(1, 2, 3) //A
array(4, 5, 6) //B
array('foo' => {pointer to A}, 'bar' => {pointer to B}) //C
{pointer to C} //$x

Now lets make a copy of $x:

$y = $x;

This uses very little extra memory, because all it has to do is create another pointer to C:

array(1, 2, 3) //A
array(4, 5, 6) //B
array('foo' => {pointer to A}, 'bar' => {pointer to B}) //C
{pointer to C} //$x
{pointer to C} //$y

Now lets change $y:

$y['foo'][0] = 10;

Here's what DOESN'T happen:

array(1, 2, 3) //A
array(10, 2, 3) //A2
array(4, 5, 6) //B
array(4, 5, 6) //B2
array('foo' => {pointer to A}, 'bar' => {pointer to B}) //C
array('foo' => {pointer to A2}, 'bar' => {pointer to B2}) //C2
{pointer to C} //$x
{pointer to C2} //$y

Notice that B and B2 are identical. There's no need to keep the same thing twice, so what actually happens is this:

array(1, 2, 3) //A
array(10, 2, 3) //A2
array(4, 5, 6) //B
array('foo' => {pointer to A}, 'bar' => {pointer to B}) //C
array('foo' => {pointer to A2}, 'bar' => {pointer to B}) //C2
{pointer to C} //$x
{pointer to C2} //$y

In this simple case, the benefit is pretty small, but imagine that instead of three numbers, the 'bar' array contained thousands of numbers. You end up saving huge amounts of memory.

Relating this to your original code, try printing out the memory usage not only at the start and the end, but after every new array assignment. You'll see that the memory usage increases by only a fraction of what the original array takes up after each step. This is because only part of the array is being copied, not the whole thing. Specifically, the first-level array and the specific sub array you change get copied, but the other sub arrays do not get copied.

The fact that the final amount of memory used is twice as much as the starting amount seems to be a coincidence due to the particular setup of your code and the number of copies of the array you make.

(In reality, PHP can do even better than what I describe here (it will probably keep only one copy of 'foo' and 'bar', etc.), but for the most part it boils down to the same sort of trick.)

If you want a more dramatic demonstration of this, do something like this:

$base = memory_get_usage();
$x = array('small' => array('this is small'), 'big' => array());
for ($i = 0; $i < 1000000; $i++) {
    $x['big'][] = $i;
}
echo (memory_get_usage() - $base).PHP_EOL; //a lot of memory
$y = $x;
$y['small'][0] = 'now a bit bigger';
echo (memory_get_usage() - $base).PHP_EOL; //a bit more memory
$z = $x;
$z['big'][0] = 2;
echo (memory_get_usage() - $base).PHP_EOL; //a LOT more memory
  • Hey, I was thinking something along these lines, However it does not add up, Using another test case it was already reproduced that memory allocation doubles after 4 identical actions (see the last edit in the question). 4 identical actions on arrays of the same size should have a linear effect. If we do the exact same action 4 times, a single time should cost 1/4th of the cost. Notice that in the tests I keep changing different indices, If we copy one, we copy all. I'll edit my question with new memory values as soon as I can though. – Patrick Jan 12 '15 at 10:08
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    @Patrick The first action doesn't cost as much, because you don't have to keep the old value since no variable uses it. The second through fourth actions have to make a copy because the original is still in use. Print memory usage after every assignment to see this. – Austin Jan 12 '15 at 10:12
  • After more testing your answer is indeed correct, Superb! :) – Patrick Jan 13 '15 at 9:47

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