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HERE author discusses three methods to count source to destination path of k length. I am not able to get the last method which is based on divide and conquer approach and claimed to be O(V^3logk) in time.

We can also use Divide and Conquer to solve the above problem in O(V^3Logk) time. The count of walks of length k from u to v is the [u][v]’th entry in (graph[V][V])^k. We can calculate power of by doing O(Logk) multiplication by using the divide and conquer technique to calculate power. A multiplication between two matrices of size V x V takes O(V^3) time. Therefore overall time complexity of this method is O(V3Logk).

Particularly the line which says

The count of walks of length k from u to v is the [u][v]’th entry in (graph[V][V])^k

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If you use an adjacency matrix to represent the graph (let's say M), M^k is the matrix that denotes the number of paths of size k between every pair of nodes. You can calculate M^k using O(log k) matrix multiplications (each taking O(V^3) time).

It's a divide and conquer algorithm because to calculate M^k you can calculate M' = M^(k/2) and then M^k = M' x M' (or M' x M' x M, if k isn't divisible by 2).

Here is an example of M^k calculation in O(log k) multiplications:

def matrix_mul(A, B):
    return [[
           sum(x * B[i][col] for i,x in enumerate(row)) for col in range(len(B[0]))
    ] for row in A]

def matrix_pow(M, k):
    if k==1: return M
    M2 = matrix_pow(M, k/2)
    M2 = matrix_mul(M2, M2)

    if k%2==1: M2 = matrix_mul(M2, M)
    return M2

M = [[0,1,1,0,1,0,0,0],
     [0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0],
     [0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0],
     [0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0],
     [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
     [0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],
     [1,0,1,0,0,0,0,0],
     [0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0]]

for i in range(1, 10):
    print 'Paths from 7 to 2 of size', i, '=', matrix_pow(M, i)[6][1]

Which outputs:

Paths from 7 to 2 of size 1 = 0
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 2 = 1
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 3 = 0
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 4 = 0
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 5 = 1
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 6 = 1
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 7 = 0
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 8 = 1
Paths from 7 to 2 of size 9 = 2
  • Thank you. Did not get - "You can calculate M^k using O(log k) matrix multiplications." ? – Walt Jan 12 '15 at 15:58
  • Matrix multiplication is an associative operation, you can do them in any order. You can just solve it using Exponentiation by Squaring. – Juan Lopes Jan 12 '15 at 16:08
  • Thank You. Just one last question. Here cpsc.ualr.edu/srini/DM/chapters/examples/ans5.3.2.html . .there is only one path from 7 to 2 of length 2. Still entry[7][2] in F^3, F^4 ... is 1 ?? What am I missing here. If M^k denotes number of paths of length k .. entry[7][2] should be 0 in F^3, F^4 etc. – Walt Jan 12 '15 at 16:13
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    The matrices in that page aren't F^3, F^4, etc., they're just iterations of the Warshal algorithm. Changed the example in the answer to calculate with that matrix. Actually there is path of size 2, 5, 6, 8, two paths of size 9, etc. – Juan Lopes Jan 12 '15 at 16:19

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