11

How and "could be" organized return from the method which returns tuple type with the name of parameters, as an example

private static Tuple<string, string> methodTuple()
{
    return new {Name = "Nick", Age = "Twenty"}; /*exception because need to new Tuple<string, string>(){Item1 = "Nick", Item2 = "Twenty"}o*/
}

and call parameters like methodTuple.Name not like methodTuple.Item1....N

Is this possible or not?

UPD: I want to create object with named parameters without new named type.

14

You need to declare a helper class to do so.

public class MyResult
{
    public string Nick { get; set; }
    public string Age { get; set; }
}

What you're trying to return is an anonymous type. As the name suggests you don't know what its name is, so you can't declare your method to return it.

Anonymous Types (C# Programming Guide)

You cannot declare a field, a property, an event, or the return type of a method as having an anonymous type. Similarly, you cannot declare a formal parameter of a method, property, constructor, or indexer as having an anonymous type. To pass an anonymous type, or a collection that contains anonymous types, as an argument to a method, you can declare the parameter as type object. However, doing this defeats the purpose of strong typing. If you must store query results or pass them outside the method boundary, consider using an ordinary named struct or class instead of an anonymous type.

Update

C#7 introduces Tuple support built into the language and it comes with named tuples

(string name, int age) methodTuple()
{
    (...)
}

Read more on docs.microsoft.com: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/articles/csharp/csharp-7#tuples

  • 2
    Note that the type you defined here is mutable, not immutable, and hasn't overridden its equality semantics for value semantics, unlike Tuple or anonymous types. – Servy Jan 12 '15 at 18:49
12

In C# 7.0 (Visual Studio 2017) there is a new option to do that:

(string first, string middle, string last) LookupName(long id)
  • What's the naming convention? Same as parameter names (camelCase)? Or method names (ProperCase)? – toddmo Mar 24 '17 at 18:33
  • 2
    Thinking of them as public fields (or properties), they should be in proper case, I think – Soroush Falahati Apr 23 '17 at 15:39
  • This option is available for ValueTuples not for Tuples! – Rekshino Feb 21 '18 at 10:15
6

This is not possible with Tuple, no. You'll need to create your own new named type to do this.

  • 5
    It's possible now in C# 7.0 – toddmo Mar 24 '17 at 18:34
  • @toddmo: What is the point of using a Tuple with named properties; over just using a normal class or anonymous type? Just asking because I can't think of a use case that isn't covered by the original possibilities. – Flater May 8 '17 at 9:42
  • @Flater, I encourage you to pose that itself as a question. Hopefully Eric, the head of the c# team, will give you their thinking. Here are the new capabilities: blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2016/08/24/… – toddmo May 8 '17 at 17:22
  • 1
    @toddmo Anders Hejlsberg is the head of the C# team. If you mean Eric Lippert, he left the C# team a number of years back, and was never the head of the team. – Servy May 8 '17 at 17:28
  • @Flater they are great when you just need a couple properties grouped together - or a simple return type from a method where creating even a simple type seems like a chore. It's especially useful if it's a one off where a type would only ever be used once. It's sort of like an anonymous type that has named properties :-) Would be much more useful if you could declare an alias to a tuple to use in several places. – Simon_Weaver Oct 17 '19 at 4:22
6

Starting C# v7.0 now it is possible to name the tuple properties which earlier used to default to names like Item1, Item2 and so on.

Naming the properties of Tuple Literals:

var myDetails = (MyName: "RBT_Yoga", MyAge: 22, MyFavoriteFood: "Dosa");
Console.WriteLine($"Name - {myDetails.MyName}, Age - {myDetails.MyAge}, Passion - {myDetails.MyFavoriteFood}");

The output on console:

Name - RBT_Yoga, Age - 22, Passion - Dosa

Returning Tuple (having named properties) from a method:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var empInfo = GetEmpInfo();
    Console.WriteLine($"Employee Details: {empInfo.firstName}, {empInfo.lastName}, {empInfo.computerName}, {empInfo.Salary}");
}

static (string firstName, string lastName, string computerName, int Salary) GetEmpInfo()
{
    //This is hardcoded just for the demonstration. Ideally this data might be coming from some DB or web service call
    return ("Rasik", "Bihari", "Rasik-PC", 1000);
}

The output on console:

Employee Details: Rasik, Bihari, Rasik-PC, 1000

Creating a list of Tuples having named properties

var tupleList = new List<(int Index, string Name)>
{
    (1, "cow"),
    (5, "chickens"),
    (1, "airplane")
};

foreach (var tuple in tupleList)
    Console.WriteLine($"{tuple.Index} - {tuple.Name}");

Output on console:

1 - cow 5 - chickens 1 - airplane

I hope I've covered everything. In case, there is anything which I've missed then please give me a feedback in comments.

Note: My code snippets are using string interpolation feature of C# v6 as detailed here.

  • 1
    install-package System.ValueTuple – OzBob Mar 14 '19 at 4:27
1

I usually create a new type that derives from Tuple, and map your explicit properties to return the base class's ItemX properties. eg:

public class Person : Tuple<string, string>
{
    public Key(string name, string age) : base(name, age) { }

    public string Name => Item1;
    public string Age => Item2;
}
0

Unfortunately, this is not possible using the "Tuple" type, as it is defined as "Item1...N" in MSDN. So this exception is valid.

This method can compile in 3 ways: 1.) Change return type to object - this will create an "anonymous" type, which you can then use later. It is not particularly useful if you want to access the "Name" or "Age" property later without some additional work. 2.) Change return type to dynamic - this will let you access the "Name" and "Age" property, but will make the entire program (just the DLL where this method is located really) slightly slower as the use of dynamic necessitates throwing out some strong typing. 3.) Create a class and use it as teh return type.

Sample code here:

private static object ObjectTuple()
        {
            return new { Name = "Nick", Age = "Twenty" };
        }

        private static dynamic DynamicTuple()
        {
            return new { Name = "Nick", Age = "Twenty" };
        }

        private static Temp TempTuple()
        {
            return new Temp{ Name = "Nick", Age = "Twenty" };
        }

        class Temp
        {
            public string Name { get; set; }
            public string Age { get; set; }
        }
0

As per me, when you want to return or get many things from a single method, better make its return type as CLASS but if you intend to use Tuple which itself is Class then for better naming this new class should inherit from Tuple. e.g. mentioned below.

 public CustomReturn ExecuteTask( int a, string b, bool c, object d )
        {
        // Calling constructor of CustomReturn Class to set and get values
          return new CustomReturn(a,b,c,d);
        }

        internal class CustomReturn 
        // for tuple inherit from Tuple<int,string,bool,object,double>
        { 
          //for tuple public int A{ get {this.Item1} private set;}

          public int A{get;private set;}
          public string B{get;private set;}
          public bool C{get;private set;}
          public object D{get;private set;}

          public CustomReturn (int a, string b, bool c, object d )
              // use this line for tuple ": base( obj, boolean )"
            {
              this.A = a;
              this.B = b;
              this.C = c;
              this.D = d;
            }

        }

    Main(args)
    {
      var result = ExecuteTask( 10, "s", true, "object" );
      // now if u have inherited Tuple for CustomReturn class then 

      // on doing result. you will get your custom name as A,B,C,D for //Item1,Item2,Item3,Item4 respectively also these Item1,Item2,Item3,Item4 will also be there.
    }
-4

You might try dynamic:

    private static dynamic methodTuple()
    {
        return new { Name = "Nick", Age = "Twenty" }; 
    }

... but returning a defined Type or struct is best as mentioned already.

  • 3
    Then he'll have lost all static type safety, clearly defeating the entire purpose of having more semantically meaningful type information (and then some). It makes the code noticably worse than even having property names of Item1 and Item2. Instead of having two properties with bad names, the caller now doesn't even know what properties are there, what they're called, what their types are, etc. – Servy Jan 12 '15 at 18:50
  • it satifies the requirement. Are you saying there is no use for dynamic? – Crowcoder Jan 12 '15 at 18:51
  • 1
    Thats a hole different story. – CSharpie Jan 12 '15 at 18:51
  • 1
    @Crowcoder He's saying that this is not an appropriate usage of dynamic not that there are no appropriate uses of dynamic. Those are two radically different statements. – Servy Jan 12 '15 at 18:53
  • I'm not saying it is better than returning a defined Type or stuct, but I was providing a solution to the specific problem. – Crowcoder Jan 12 '15 at 18:55

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