79

I'm trying to figure out a simple way to do something like this with dplyr (data set = dat, variable = x):

day$x[dat$x<0]=NA

Should be simple but this is the best I can do at the moment. Is there an easier way?

dat =  dat %>% mutate(x=ifelse(x<0,NA,x))
0

5 Answers 5

121

You can use replace which is a bit faster than ifelse:

dat <-  dat %>% mutate(x = replace(x, x<0, NA))

You can speed it up a bit more by supplying an index to replace using which:

dat <- dat %>% mutate(x = replace(x, which(x<0L), NA))

On my machine, this cut the time to a third, see below.

Here's a little comparison of the different answers, which is only indicative of course:

set.seed(24)
dat <- data.frame(x=rnorm(1e6))
system.time(dat %>% mutate(x = replace(x, x<0, NA)))
       User      System     elapsed
       0.03        0.00        0.03 
system.time(dat %>% mutate(x=ifelse(x<0,NA,x)))
       User      System     elapsed
       0.30        0.00        0.29 
system.time(setDT(dat)[x<0,x:=NA])
       User      System     elapsed
       0.01        0.00        0.02 
system.time(dat$x[dat$x<0] <- NA)
       User      System     elapsed
       0.03        0.00        0.03 
system.time(dat %>% mutate(x = "is.na<-"(x, x < 0)))
       User      System     elapsed
       0.05        0.00        0.05 
system.time(dat %>% mutate(x = NA ^ (x < 0) * x))
       User      System     elapsed
       0.01        0.00        0.02 
system.time(dat %>% mutate(x = replace(x, which(x<0), NA)))
       User      System     elapsed
       0.01        0.00        0.01 

(I'm using dplyr_0.3.0.2 and data.table_1.9.4)


Since we're always very interested in benchmarking, especially in the course of data.table-vs-dplyr discussions I provide another benchmark of 3 of the answers using microbenchmark and the data by akrun. Note that I modified dplyr1 to be the updated version of my answer:

set.seed(285)
dat1 <- dat <- data.frame(x=sample(-5:5, 1e8, replace=TRUE), y=rnorm(1e8))
dtbl1 <- function() {setDT(dat)[x<0,x:=NA]}
dplr1 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = replace(x, which(x<0L), NA))}
dplr2 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = NA ^ (x < 0) * x)}
microbenchmark(dtbl1(), dplr1(), dplr2(), unit='relative', times=20L)
#Unit: relative
#    expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
# dtbl1() 1.091208 4.319863 4.194086 4.162326 4.252482    20
# dplr1() 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000    20
# dplr2() 6.251354 5.529948 5.344294 5.311595 5.190192    20
3
  • Perhaps akrun is willing to update his answer. He seems to be running the latest versions of both packages.
    – talat
    Jan 12, 2015 at 21:05
  • This seems like a case where the base way is much simpler syntax wise.
    – Glen
    Aug 31, 2017 at 18:59
  • I cannot reproduce your benchmark! data.table is faster.
    – M--
    Feb 14, 2020 at 20:27
17

You can use the is.na<- function:

dat %>% mutate(x = "is.na<-"(x, x < 0))

Or you can use mathematical operators:

dat %>% mutate(x = NA ^ (x < 0) * x)
1
  • Looking for an example where I set one variable to NA based on some other condition ... none of this page seems to do that?
    – Markm0705
    Aug 25, 2021 at 6:25
16

The most natural approach in dplyr is to use the na_if function.

For one variable:

dat %<>% mutate(x = na_if(x, x < 0))

For all variables:

dat %<>% mutate_all(~ na_if(., . < 0))

If interested in replacing a specific value, instead of a range for all variables:

dat %<>% mutate_all(na_if, 0)

Note that I am using the %<>% operator from the magrittr package.

3
  • 1
    Thanks, good to know! I don't think this function was available when I first asked the question.
    – Glen
    Jul 5, 2019 at 18:27
  • 8
    na_if(x, y) doesn't seem to work in this example where y is a condition that contains x. Compare: quakes %>% mutate(depth = na_if(depth, depth > 610)) doesn't mutate anything, but the following does: quakes %>% mutate(depth = replace(depth, depth > 610))
    – Agile Bean
    Nov 23, 2019 at 7:37
  • Looking for an example where I set one variable to NA based on some other condition ... none of this page seems to do that?
    – Markm0705
    Aug 25, 2021 at 6:25
11

If you are using data.table, the below code is faster

library(data.table)
setDT(dat)[x<0,x:=NA]

Benchmarks

Using data.table_1.9.5 and dplyr_0.3.0.9000

library(microbenchmark)
set.seed(285)
dat <- data.frame(x=sample(-5:5, 1e7, replace=TRUE), y=rnorm(1e7))

dtbl1 <- function() {as.data.table(dat)[x<0,x:=NA]}
dplr1 <- function() {dat %>% mutate(x = replace(x, x<0, NA))}

microbenchmark(dtbl1(), dplr1(), unit='relative', times=20L)
#Unit: relative
#expr     min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
#dtbl1() 1.00000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000    20  a 
#dplr1() 2.06654 2.064405 1.927762 1.795962 1.881821 1.885655    20   b

Updated Benchmarks

Using data.table_1.9.5 and dplyr_0.4.0. I used a slightly bigger dataset and replaced as.data.table with setDT (Included @Sven Hohenstein's faster function as well.)

set.seed(285)
dat <- data.frame(x=sample(-5:5, 1e8, replace=TRUE), y=rnorm(1e8))
dat1 <- copy(dat)
dtbl1 <- function() {setDT(dat)[x<0,x:=NA]}
dplr1 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = replace(x, x<0, NA))}
dplr2 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = NA ^ (x < 0) * x)} 

microbenchmark(dtbl1(), dplr1(), dplr2(), unit='relative', times=20L)
#Unit: relative
#  expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
#dtbl1() 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000    20  a 
#dplr1() 2.523945 2.542412 2.536255 2.579379 2.518336 2.486757    20   b
#dplr2() 1.139216 1.089992 1.088753 1.058653 1.093906 1.100690    20  a 

Updated Benchmarks2

At the request of @docendo discimus, benchmarking again his "new" version of dplyrusing data.table_1.9.5 and dplyr_0.4.0.

NOTE: Because there is a change in @docendo discimus code, I changed 0 to 0L for the data.table`

set.seed(285)
dat <- data.frame(x=sample(-5:5, 1e8, replace=TRUE), y=rnorm(1e8))
dat1 <- copy(dat)
dtbl1 <- function() {setDT(dat)[x<0L, x:= NA]}
dplr1 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = replace(x, which(x<0L), NA))}
dplr2 <- function() {dat1 %>% mutate(x = NA ^ (x < 0) * x)} 

microbenchmark(dtbl1(), dplr1(), dplr2(), unit='relative', times=20L)
#Unit: relative
#expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
#dtbl1() 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000    20 a  
#dplr1() 2.186055 2.183432 2.142293 2.222458 2.194450 1.442444    20  b 
#dplr2() 2.919854 2.925795 2.852528 2.942700 2.954657 1.904249    20   c

data

set.seed(24)
dat <- data.frame(x=sample(-5:5, 25, replace=TRUE), y=rnorm(25))
9
  • On my computer, dplyr is little faster. I have data.table_1.9.5, dplyr_0.4.0.
    – Khashaa
    Jan 12, 2015 at 19:35
  • @Khashaa I used data.table_1.9.5 and dplyr_0.3.0.9000. So, may be there is a version difference.
    – akrun
    Jan 12, 2015 at 19:36
  • data.table_1.9.4 and dplyr_0.3.0.2 Similar results as @Akrun. Then I upgraded to dplyr_0.4.0, dplyr is still ~2x faster.
    – Vlo
    Jan 12, 2015 at 19:53
  • 1
    @Arun Thanks for the comment. After some thought, I came to the conclusion that this could be because I posted a data.table solution for a dplyr specific question.
    – akrun
    Jan 23, 2015 at 9:26
  • 2
    @akrun, it is also tagged "r". The fact that they did not write a note already tells a lot. This is SO. Not a dplyr/data.table forum.
    – Arun
    Jan 23, 2015 at 9:57
1

Using replace directly on the x column and not using mutate also works.

dat$x <- replace(dat$x, dat$x<0, NA)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.