3

I have a binary number something like this.. var data = "1100110010". I am trying to convert this into appropriate signed decimal number in Javascript.

The steps I use are following

1) var data = "1100110010"; var bin2dec = parseInt(data,2).toString(10);

The bin2dec gives the converted Decimal number as "818" .

But I want to access the signed decimal of the binary number too.

The signed decimal number for this binary code is "-206".

How can I access both signed and unsigned decimal Value from a given Binary Number. Please let me know . Any ideas would help

0

Using some bit-shifting trickery

function uintToInt(uint, nbit) {
    nbit = +nbit || 32;
    if (nbit > 32) throw new RangeError('uintToInt only supports ints up to 32 bits');
    uint <<= 32 - nbit;
    uint >>= 32 - nbit;
    return uint;
}

uintToInt(818, 10); // -206
  • Why 818? Because this is the uint value of your binary string

    parseInt('1100110010', 2); // 818
    
  • Why 10? Because your signed int is represented by 10 bits in your binary string

    '1100110010'.length; // 10
    

Please note that for positive numbers, you can't just take nbit = str.length; as the string may not be 0-padded, you'll need to know how many bits you're actually using

You may also want to throw an error for uint > 4294967295


For completeness,

function intToUint(int, nbit) {
    var u = new Uint32Array(1);
    nbit = +nbit || 32;
    if (nbit > 32) throw new RangeError('intToUint only supports ints up to 32 bits');
    u[0] = int;
    if (nbit < 32) { // don't accidentally sign again
        int = Math.pow(2, nbit) - 1;
        return u[0] & int;
    } else {
        return u[0];
    }
}

intToUint(-206, 10); // 818
  • Thanks for the answers.. I am getting the data from a hex code.. Is there any way I can find if the hex code is a signed decimal or a unsigned decimal. and How to convert the hex code into the exact signed decimal – Chait Jan 14 '15 at 15:50
4

It's possible to convert binary numbers to signed decimals using JavaScript's typed arrays.

const unsigned = 0b1111111100110010;
const [ signed ] = new Int16Array([0b1111111100110010]);

console.log(unsigned); // => 65330
console.log(signed); // => -206

I'm sure this will be less performant than bitwise operations, but it's certainly less code.

1

Is that what you want?

var data = "1100110010";
var bin2dec = parseInt(data,2).toString(10);
var signed = (data.substr(0,1) === '1' ? '-':'+') + parseInt(data.substr(1),2);

This will give you -306 for the signed number. I am not sure if you had a typo in the number you indicated in your question (-206).

Probably not the best solution, but should work. You might still want to check the number of binary digits before deciding if it is signed.

  • This gives -306 not -206 – Paul S. Jan 12 '15 at 22:51
  • I know, i thought it was a typo in the question. – Gerd K Jan 12 '15 at 23:07
  • In 32 bits, -206 is 11111111111111111111111100110010, so it looks like OP has a 10 bit signed integer – Paul S. Jan 12 '15 at 23:17
  • You are right, if it is a 10 bit two's complement representation. I thought he is using the leading bit for the sign (i know it's not usual for most computer representations) and just had a typo in the number. – Gerd K Jan 12 '15 at 23:54
1

Some other ways:

const bin = "1100110010"
const decimal = parseInt(bin,2)
const numBits = bin.length

let p = 0x80000000 >> (32 - numBits) 

console.log(p | decimal)
//or:
console.log(parseInt(bin.padStart(32,'1'),2) | 0)

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