22

Here's the short version. First and foremost: I want my class to be immutable. I know that a class can't be both abstract and final. What I'm asking is: is there a way to only allow inner classes to extend and implement the outer, abstract class? This may not be the best method to achieve my immutable goals, so if somebody has a better design, I would love to hear it.

I am writing a class for vector operations -- as in physics and engineering, not the programming sense. (I'm also aware that JScience has a package for this kind of stuff. I want to write my own, and keep it simple.)

I like the pattern used in Java's geometry package, wherein, say, a Line2D can be created using one of two precision levels: float or double.

public abstract class Line2D {
    public static class Float extends Line2D { /* Implementation */ }
    public static class Double extends Line2D { /* Implementation */ }
}

This is a feature I would really like to incorporate and expand upon in my class, so I created the following:

public abstract class Vector2D {

    public final static class Integer extends Vector2D {

        // Component length projected along x/y axis, respectively
        final private int i, j;

        public Integer( int i, int j ) {
            this.i = i;
            this.j = j;
        }

        public Object doStuff() { /* vector operations */ }
    }

    public final static class Float extends Vector2D {
        // Identical to Vector2D.Integer, except with floats
    }

    public final static class Double extends Vector2D { /* Same Idea */ }

    // Outer class methods and whatnot
}

Obviously, Vector2D.Integer, Vector2D.Float, and Vector2D.Double are all final. Is there any way to make Vector2D final to everything except these inner classes?

2
  • By the way - can't you use generics for this? Most operations should work with them and it is more idiomatic to write Vector<Integer> in Java instead of Vector.Integer... Then you wouldn't need all that casting around...
    – Falco
    Jan 13, 2015 at 8:47
  • 1
    @Falco Depending on the performance requirements, the boxing/unboxing conversions may (unfortunately still) be prohibitively expensive (last but not least due to the potential garbage implied by millions of Double instances. There is a reason for the specializations of, for example, Stream in Java 8 as DoubleStream...)
    – Marco13
    Jan 13, 2015 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

25

Is there a way to only allow inner classes to extend and implement the outer, abstract class?

Yes, make the constructor of the outer class private.

Example:

abstract class MyAbstractClass {
    int i; // some property
    private MyAbstractClass(int i) {
        this.i = i;
    }

    public static class InnerConcrete extends MyAbstractClass {
        int j; // some other property
        public InnerConcrete(int i, int j) {
            super(i);
            this.j = j;
        }
    }
}

I don't think I've ever come across this approach. A factory pattern may be more flexible and allows you split the otherwise potentially large class into several files. Package access level of the abstract class may perhaps also be sufficient.

7
  • I forgot about this approach. But doesn't this lead to an odd design? Jan 12, 2015 at 22:32
  • @LuiggiMendoza, what do you mean by odd?
    – aioobe
    Jan 12, 2015 at 22:40
  • I mean, why to use inner static classes instead of top classes to achieve this purpose? Jan 12, 2015 at 22:41
  • 2
    Let me make sure I understand this correctly. Since the outer class is still public non-final, another class could, in theory, extend it. However, since it is impossible to invoke the super constructor from the outside world, it is de facto final?
    – drmuelr
    Jan 12, 2015 at 22:43
  • 2
    @LuiggiMendoza, I guess the intent of the OP is to avoid having to take unforeseen inheritance into account when designing the abstract class. Item 15 in Effective Java says Design and document for inheritance or else prohibit it.
    – aioobe
    Jan 12, 2015 at 22:46
10

Is there a way to only allow inner classes to extend and implement the outer, abstract class?

I would opt for another alternative: make your abstract classes non-public and only make public the final implementation classes. This is the case of AbstractStringBuilder, which belongs to java.lang package, is abstract and non-public, and it's implemented by StringBuilder and StringBuffer classes, which are public final.

Here's the relevant source code of these classes:

abstract class AbstractStringBuilder implements Appendable, CharSequence {
    //implementation details...
}

public final class StringBuilder
    extends AbstractStringBuilder
    implements java.io.Serializable, CharSequence {
    //implementation details...
}

public final class StringBuffer
    extends AbstractStringBuilder
    implements java.io.Serializable, CharSequence {
    //implementation details...
}
1
  • This could well be a great alternative if I were doing something slightly different. However, I only went with inner classes because they are all effectively the same and do the same things, just with varying levels of precision. Splitting them up into separate classes would add more complexity than it's worth, in this case. Beyond that, this is a great solution.
    – drmuelr
    Jan 12, 2015 at 22:59

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