251

How can I find the p-value (significance) of each coefficient?

lm = sklearn.linear_model.LinearRegression()
lm.fit(x,y)
2

11 Answers 11

301

This is kind of overkill but let's give it a go. First lets use statsmodel to find out what the p-values should be

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from sklearn import datasets, linear_model
from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression
import statsmodels.api as sm
from scipy import stats

diabetes = datasets.load_diabetes()
X = diabetes.data
y = diabetes.target

X2 = sm.add_constant(X)
est = sm.OLS(y, X2)
est2 = est.fit()
print(est2.summary())

and we get

                         OLS Regression Results                            
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:                      y   R-squared:                       0.518
Model:                            OLS   Adj. R-squared:                  0.507
Method:                 Least Squares   F-statistic:                     46.27
Date:                Wed, 08 Mar 2017   Prob (F-statistic):           3.83e-62
Time:                        10:08:24   Log-Likelihood:                -2386.0
No. Observations:                 442   AIC:                             4794.
Df Residuals:                     431   BIC:                             4839.
Df Model:                          10                                         
Covariance Type:            nonrobust                                         
==============================================================================
                 coef    std err          t      P>|t|      [0.025      0.975]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
const        152.1335      2.576     59.061      0.000     147.071     157.196
x1           -10.0122     59.749     -0.168      0.867    -127.448     107.424
x2          -239.8191     61.222     -3.917      0.000    -360.151    -119.488
x3           519.8398     66.534      7.813      0.000     389.069     650.610
x4           324.3904     65.422      4.958      0.000     195.805     452.976
x5          -792.1842    416.684     -1.901      0.058   -1611.169      26.801
x6           476.7458    339.035      1.406      0.160    -189.621    1143.113
x7           101.0446    212.533      0.475      0.635    -316.685     518.774
x8           177.0642    161.476      1.097      0.273    -140.313     494.442
x9           751.2793    171.902      4.370      0.000     413.409    1089.150
x10           67.6254     65.984      1.025      0.306     -62.065     197.316
==============================================================================
Omnibus:                        1.506   Durbin-Watson:                   2.029
Prob(Omnibus):                  0.471   Jarque-Bera (JB):                1.404
Skew:                           0.017   Prob(JB):                        0.496
Kurtosis:                       2.726   Cond. No.                         227.
==============================================================================

Ok, let's reproduce this. It is kind of overkill as we are almost reproducing a linear regression analysis using Matrix Algebra. But what the heck.

lm = LinearRegression()
lm.fit(X,y)
params = np.append(lm.intercept_,lm.coef_)
predictions = lm.predict(X)

newX = pd.DataFrame({"Constant":np.ones(len(X))}).join(pd.DataFrame(X))
MSE = (sum((y-predictions)**2))/(len(newX)-len(newX.columns))

# Note if you don't want to use a DataFrame replace the two lines above with
# newX = np.append(np.ones((len(X),1)), X, axis=1)
# MSE = (sum((y-predictions)**2))/(len(newX)-len(newX[0]))

var_b = MSE*(np.linalg.inv(np.dot(newX.T,newX)).diagonal())
sd_b = np.sqrt(var_b)
ts_b = params/ sd_b

p_values =[2*(1-stats.t.cdf(np.abs(i),(len(newX)-len(newX[0])))) for i in ts_b]

sd_b = np.round(sd_b,3)
ts_b = np.round(ts_b,3)
p_values = np.round(p_values,3)
params = np.round(params,4)

myDF3 = pd.DataFrame()
myDF3["Coefficients"],myDF3["Standard Errors"],myDF3["t values"],myDF3["Probabilities"] = [params,sd_b,ts_b,p_values]
print(myDF3)

And this gives us.

    Coefficients  Standard Errors  t values  Probabilities
0       152.1335            2.576    59.061         0.000
1       -10.0122           59.749    -0.168         0.867
2      -239.8191           61.222    -3.917         0.000
3       519.8398           66.534     7.813         0.000
4       324.3904           65.422     4.958         0.000
5      -792.1842          416.684    -1.901         0.058
6       476.7458          339.035     1.406         0.160
7       101.0446          212.533     0.475         0.635
8       177.0642          161.476     1.097         0.273
9       751.2793          171.902     4.370         0.000
10       67.6254           65.984     1.025         0.306

So we can reproduce the values from statsmodel.

11
  • 2
    what does it meant that my var_b are all Nans? Is there any underlying reason why the linear algebra part fails?
    – famargar
    Mar 10, 2017 at 14:23
  • 8
    @famargar I also had the problem of all nans. For me it was because my X's were a sample of my data so the index was off. This causes errors when calling pd.DataFrame.join(). I made this one line change and it seems to work now: newX = pd.DataFrame({"Constant":np.ones(len(X))}).join(pd.DataFrame(X.reset_index(drop=True)))
    – pault
    Dec 1, 2017 at 18:46
  • 2
    so where are the p-values or significance? Mar 11, 2020 at 3:12
  • 2
    @mLstudent33 The "probabilities" column.
    – skeller88
    Apr 26, 2020 at 2:39
  • 3
    I think in the p-value calculation, it should be len(newX)-len(X[0]) instead of len(newX)-len(newX[0])
    – newbie
    Jan 28, 2021 at 22:20
68

scikit-learn's LinearRegression doesn't calculate this information but you can easily extend the class to do it:

from sklearn import linear_model
from scipy import stats
import numpy as np


class LinearRegression(linear_model.LinearRegression):
    """
    LinearRegression class after sklearn's, but calculate t-statistics
    and p-values for model coefficients (betas).
    Additional attributes available after .fit()
    are `t` and `p` which are of the shape (y.shape[1], X.shape[1])
    which is (n_features, n_coefs)
    This class sets the intercept to 0 by default, since usually we include it
    in X.
    """

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if not "fit_intercept" in kwargs:
            kwargs['fit_intercept'] = False
        super(LinearRegression, self)\
                .__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def fit(self, X, y, n_jobs=1):
        self = super(LinearRegression, self).fit(X, y, n_jobs)

        sse = np.sum((self.predict(X) - y) ** 2, axis=0) / float(X.shape[0] - X.shape[1])
        se = np.array([
            np.sqrt(np.diagonal(sse[i] * np.linalg.inv(np.dot(X.T, X))))
                                                    for i in range(sse.shape[0])
                    ])

        self.t = self.coef_ / se
        self.p = 2 * (1 - stats.t.cdf(np.abs(self.t), y.shape[0] - X.shape[1]))
        return self

Stolen from here.

You should take a look at statsmodels for this kind of statistical analysis in Python.

1
  • 6
    Well. This does not seep to work because sse is a scalar so sse.shape does not really mean anything.
    – piedpiper
    Mar 20, 2018 at 17:52
20

An easy way to pull of the p-values is to use statsmodels regression:

import statsmodels.api as sm
mod = sm.OLS(Y,X)
fii = mod.fit()
p_values = fii.summary2().tables[1]['P>|t|']

You get a series of p-values that you can manipulate (for example choose the order you want to keep by evaluating each p-value):

enter image description here

1
  • Use sm.OLS() is the correct way to calculate p-value (multivariate) for any algorithm? (like decision tree, svm, k-means, logistic regression, etc)? I would like a generic method to get p-value. Thanks
    – Gilian
    Jul 17, 2020 at 18:27
16

The code in elyase's answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/27928411/4240413 does not actually work. Notice that sse is a scalar, and then it tries to iterate through it. The following code is a modified version. Not amazingly clean, but I think it works more or less.

class LinearRegression(linear_model.LinearRegression):

    def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs):
        # *args is the list of arguments that might go into the LinearRegression object
        # that we don't know about and don't want to have to deal with. Similarly, **kwargs
        # is a dictionary of key words and values that might also need to go into the orginal
        # LinearRegression object. We put *args and **kwargs so that we don't have to look
        # these up and write them down explicitly here. Nice and easy.

        if not "fit_intercept" in kwargs:
            kwargs['fit_intercept'] = False

        super(LinearRegression,self).__init__(*args,**kwargs)

    # Adding in t-statistics for the coefficients.
    def fit(self,x,y):
        # This takes in numpy arrays (not matrices). Also assumes you are leaving out the column
        # of constants.

        # Not totally sure what 'super' does here and why you redefine self...
        self = super(LinearRegression, self).fit(x,y)
        n, k = x.shape
        yHat = np.matrix(self.predict(x)).T

        # Change X and Y into numpy matricies. x also has a column of ones added to it.
        x = np.hstack((np.ones((n,1)),np.matrix(x)))
        y = np.matrix(y).T

        # Degrees of freedom.
        df = float(n-k-1)

        # Sample variance.     
        sse = np.sum(np.square(yHat - y),axis=0)
        self.sampleVariance = sse/df

        # Sample variance for x.
        self.sampleVarianceX = x.T*x

        # Covariance Matrix = [(s^2)(X'X)^-1]^0.5. (sqrtm = matrix square root.  ugly)
        self.covarianceMatrix = sc.linalg.sqrtm(self.sampleVariance[0,0]*self.sampleVarianceX.I)

        # Standard erros for the difference coefficients: the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix.
        self.se = self.covarianceMatrix.diagonal()[1:]

        # T statistic for each beta.
        self.betasTStat = np.zeros(len(self.se))
        for i in xrange(len(self.se)):
            self.betasTStat[i] = self.coef_[0,i]/self.se[i]

        # P-value for each beta. This is a two sided t-test, since the betas can be 
        # positive or negative.
        self.betasPValue = 1 - t.cdf(abs(self.betasTStat),df)
14

There could be a mistake in @JARH's answer in the case of a multivariable regression. (I do not have enough reputation to comment.)

In the following line:

p_values =[2*(1-stats.t.cdf(np.abs(i),(len(newX)-1))) for i in ts_b],

the t-values follows a chi-squared distribution of degree len(newX)-1 instead of following a chi-squared distribution of degree len(newX)-len(newX.columns)-1.

So this should be:

p_values =[2*(1-stats.t.cdf(np.abs(i),(len(newX)-len(newX.columns)-1))) for i in ts_b]

(See t-values for OLS regression for more details)

9

You can use scipy for p-value. This code is from scipy documentation.

>>> from scipy import stats
>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.random.random(10)
>>> y = np.random.random(10)
>>> slope, intercept, r_value, p_value, std_err = stats.linregress(x,y)
2
  • 5
    I don’t think this applies for multiple vectors being used during fit
    – O.rka
    Aug 3, 2018 at 2:05
  • The stats.linregress does not work with multiple-regression.
    – DmitriBolt
    Jan 21 at 23:32
6

For a one-liner you can use the pingouin.linear_regression function (disclaimer: I am the creator of Pingouin), which works with uni/multi-variate regression using NumPy arrays or Pandas DataFrame, e.g:

import pingouin as pg
# Using a Pandas DataFrame `df`:
lm = pg.linear_regression(df[['x', 'z']], df['y'])
# Using a NumPy array:
lm = pg.linear_regression(X, y)

The output is a dataframe with the beta coefficients, standard errors, T-values, p-values and confidence intervals for each predictor, as well as the R^2 and adjusted R^2 of the fit.

4

p_value is among f statistics. if you want to get the value, simply use this few lines of code:

import statsmodels.api as sm
from scipy import stats

diabetes = datasets.load_diabetes()
X = diabetes.data
y = diabetes.target

X2 = sm.add_constant(X)
est = sm.OLS(y, X2)
print(est.fit().f_pvalue)
2
  • 10
    This doesn't answer the question since you are using a different library than the one mentioned.
    – gented
    Jan 1, 2019 at 3:53
  • 2
    @gented What are the scenarios where one method of calculation would be better than the other? Jun 1, 2019 at 18:40
4

Getting little bit into the theory of linear regression, here is the summary of what we need to compute the p-values for the coefficient estimators (random variables), to check if they are significant (by rejecting the corresponding null hyothesis):

enter image description here

Now, let's compute the p-values using the following code snippets:

import numpy as np 
# generate some data 
np.random.seed(1)
n = 100
X = np.random.random((n,2))
beta = np.array([-1, 2])
noise = np.random.normal(loc=0, scale=2, size=n)
y = X@beta + noise

Compute p-values from the above formulae with scikit-learn:

# use scikit-learn's linear regression model to obtain the coefficient estimates
from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression
reg = LinearRegression().fit(X, y)
beta_hat = [reg.intercept_] + reg.coef_.tolist()
beta_hat
# [0.18444290873001834, -1.5879784718284842, 2.5252138207251904]

# compute the p-values
from scipy.stats import t
# add ones column
X1 = np.column_stack((np.ones(n), X))
# standard deviation of the noise.
sigma_hat = np.sqrt(np.sum(np.square(y - X1@beta_hat)) / (n - X1.shape[1]))
# estimate the covariance matrix for beta 
beta_cov = np.linalg.inv(X1.T@X1)
# the t-test statistic for each variable from the formula from above figure
t_vals = beta_hat / (sigma_hat * np.sqrt(np.diagonal(beta_cov)))
# compute 2-sided p-values.
p_vals = t.sf(np.abs(t_vals), n-X1.shape[1])*2 
t_vals
# array([ 0.37424023, -2.36373529,  3.57930174])
p_vals
# array([7.09042437e-01, 2.00854025e-02, 5.40073114e-04])

Compute p-values with statsmodels:

import statsmodels.api as sm
X1 = sm.add_constant(X)
model = sm.OLS(y, X2)
model = model.fit()
model.tvalues
# array([ 0.37424023, -2.36373529,  3.57930174])
# compute p-values
t.sf(np.abs(model.tvalues), n-X1.shape[1])*2 
# array([7.09042437e-01, 2.00854025e-02, 5.40073114e-04])  

model.summary()

enter image description here

As can be seen from above, the p-values computed in both the cases are exactly same.

1
  • some of the diagonal elements in beta_cov is negative, so np.sqrt(np.diagonal(beta_cov)) is failing since square root of negative, what should be done in that case? Do you know what could be the reason behind the negative values? Oct 7, 2021 at 17:24
0

Another option to those already proposed would be to use permutation testing. Fit the model N times with values of y shuffled and compute the proportion of the coefficients of fitted models that have larger values (one-sided test) or larger absolute values (two-sided test) compared to those given by the original model. These proportions are the p-values.

0

The purely sklearn solution is to use sklearn.feature_selection.f_regression, which produces p-values for all the features of the predictor vector:

#!/usr/bin/python3.6

import numpy as np
from scipy.stats import linregress
from sklearn.feature_selection import f_regression

# generating data
rng = np.random.default_rng(seed=2023) #initializing random numbers generator

n = 10 #sample size
X = rng.random((n, 2)) #predictor variables

std = 0.5
eps = rng.normal(0., std, n) #noise

Y = 1.6*X[:,0] + eps #response variable



#determine p-values using the scipy solution proposed by @AliMirzaei
p1 = linregress(X[:,0], Y).pvalue
p2 = linregress(X[:,1], Y).pvalue

#determine p-values using sklearn
pp = f_regression(X, Y)[1]

print(p1, p2)
print(pp)

Output:
enter image description here

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