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I have an array and I have to count number of ways to divide it into into 3 contiguous parts such that their sum is equal. How to modify partition problem to do so?
For example-
let A be an array containing {1, 2, 3, 0, 3}
answer - 2
as it can be divided into {{1,2},{3},{0,3}} and {{1,2},{3,0},{3}} having equal sums.

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    This question appears to be off-topic because it demonstrates no effort, contains no code, and doesn't even ask a question. – Raymond Chen Jan 13 '15 at 18:54
  • @RaymondChen well, i did modify partition problem, but being not strong at Dynamic programming, the code appeared useless to post. – john keets Jan 13 '15 at 18:58
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If I understand you correctly, you are constraining the problem such that you cannot rearrange the order of the values in the array. Assuming the problem set is reasonable, you can easily loop through and test each possible variation. This would be recursive, but no dynamic programming necessary. I don't have an IDE in front of me, but I believe code would look something like this (adapt to language of choice):

public int countWays(Array array) {
    int count = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < array.length(); ++index) {
        // how much would each partition sum to if we partitioned here?
        sum += array.get(index);

        // how many ways could the rest of the array be split to match that sum?
        count += recursiveCount(sum, array.subArray(index + 1, array.length());
    }

    return count;
}

public int recursiveCount(int partitionSum, Array remaining) {
    // base case
    if (remaining.length() == 0) {
        return 1;
    }

    int count = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < remaining.length(); ++index) {
        // how much would this partion sum to if we partitioned here?
        sum += remaining.get(index);

        // did we hit the mark?
        if (sum == partitionSum) {
            // make a partion here and see if we can finish the rest of the array
            count += recursiveCount(paritionSum, remaining.subArray(index + 1, remaining.length());
        }
    }
    return count;
}

*note: this assumes a subArray function that creates a NEW array from the first index inclusively to the second index exclusively. I believe this is the most common behavior in most libraries.

The more you know about your input the more short cuts you could add to make this more efficient. For example; if you know that the array will only contain positive numbers then you can stop testing partitions when your sum is greater than the target value, because no matter what positive number you add it will never get the sum back down to the target value.

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In the question asked we need to find three contiguous parts in an array whose sum is the same. I will mention the steps along with the code snippet that will solve the problem for you.

  1. Get the sum of the array by doing a linear scan O(n) and compute sum/3.
  2. Start scanning the given array from the end. At each index we need to store the number of ways we can get a sum equal to (sum/3) i.e. if end[i] is 3, then there are 3 subsets in the array starting from index i till n(array range) where sum is sum/3.
  3. Third and final step is to start scanning from the start and find the index where sum is sum/3. On finding the index add to the solution variable(initiated to zero), end[i+2].

The thing here we are doing is, start traversing the array from start till len(array)-3. On finding the sum, sum/3, on let say index i, we have the first half that we require.

Now, dont care about the second half and add to the solution variable(initiated to zero) a value equal to end[i+2]. end[i+2] tells us the total number of ways starting from i+2 till the end, to get a sum equal to sum/3 for the third part.

Here, what we have done is taken care of the first and the third part, doing which we have also taken care of the second part which will be by default equal to sum/3. Our solution variable will be the final answer to the problem.

Given below are the code snippets for better understanding of the above mentioned algorithm::-

Here we are doing the backward scanning to store the number of ways to get sum/3 from the end for each index.

long long int *end = (long long int *)calloc(numbers, sizeof(long long int); 
long long int temp = array[numbers-1];
if(temp==sum/3){
    end[numbers-1] = 1; 
}
for(i=numbers-2;i>=0;i--){
    end[i] = end[i+1];
    temp += array[i];
    if(temp==sum/3){
        end[i]++;
    }
}

Once we have the end array we do the forward loop and get our final solution

long long int solution = 0;
temp = 0;
for(i=0;i<numbers-2;i++){
    temp+= array[i];
    if(temp==sum/3){
        solution+=end[i+2];
    }
}

solution stores the final answer i.e. the number of ways to split the array into three contiguous parts having equal sum.

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Here is a corrected working solution, with two examples based on @Mattew Pape answer. But this is a brute force approach trying all the possible partitions. This can be further optimized.The complexity of this method is O(N!).

public class partitonArray {

    static int total = 0;
    public static int countWays(int [] arr) {
        int sum = 0;

        for (int index = 0; index < arr.length; ++index) {
            sum += arr[index];
            List<List<Integer>> lst = new ArrayList();
            List<Integer> l1 = new ArrayList();
            for(int j=0;j<=index;j++)
                l1.add(arr[j]);
            lst.add(l1);
            recursiveCount(sum,  Arrays.copyOfRange(arr, index + 1, arr.length), lst);
        }

        return total;
    }

    public static void recursiveCount(int partitionSum, int [] remaining, List<List<Integer>> lst) {
        // base case
        if (remaining.length == 0 && lst.size() > 1) {
            System.out.println("Result here = "+lst.toString());
            total++;
        }

        int sum = 0;
        List<Integer> l1 = new ArrayList();
        for (int index = 0; index < remaining.length; ++index) {
            sum += remaining[index];
            l1.add(remaining[index]);

            // did we hit the mark?
            if (sum == partitionSum) {
                // make a partion here and see if we can finish the rest of the array
                lst.add(l1);
                recursiveCount(partitionSum, Arrays.copyOfRange(remaining, index + 1, remaining.length), lst);
                lst.remove(l1);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        //int [] arr ={ 2, 4, 6,7, 7, 6, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 4,5, 4, 4, 3, 3, 1,4};
        int [] arr = {1, 2, 3, 0, 3};
        System.out.println(countWays(arr));
    }

}




**Output**:

Result here = [[1, 2], [3], [0, 3]]
Result here = [[1, 2], [3, 0], [3]]
2





/* 
  Result here `enter code here`= [[2, 4, 6, 7], [7, 6, 3, 3], [3, 4, 3, 4, 5], [4, 4, 3, 3, 1, 4]]
  Result here = [[2, 4, 6, 7, 7, 6, 3, 3], [3, 4, 3, 4, 5, 4, 4, 3, 3, 1, 4]]
  2
  */
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The solution approach can be like below:

  1. At first, we should check if the sum of all the elements of the array is divisible by 3 or not. If it is not divisible by 3 then we will not be able to divide it into three parts. So, we will return 0.
  2. It is obvious that the sum of each part of each contiguous part will be equal to the sum of all elements divided by 3. So, we will call it as part_sum which is Array_Sum / 3.
  3. We will have to create an array suffix_part_count[], where suffix_part_count[i] equals 1, if the sum of elements from i-th to n-th equals Array_Sum/3 else 0. Now, we will calculate the cumulative sum of the suffix_part_count array from the last index. It is because when we find any prefix part, we will match with the correct suffix position where we will get the suffix part combinations count.
  4. Then, for each prefix of initial array 1…i with the sum that equals Array_Sum/3, we need to add to the answer suffix_part_count[i+2]. Now why suffix_part_count[i+2] ?
    Because, when we get any prefix part which is equal to the part value and we know about if any suffix part present at i + 2 index or not with the suffix_part_count array. We are getting the count from suffix array at i + 2 index because we need to have another middle part which will be definitely equal to the part value.

For example: {1, 2, 3, 0, 3} . Let's do the steps of above.

  1. The sum of the array is 9 and it is divisible by 3. So, we can make three parts here.
  2. Each part value will be (9/3) = 3
  3. Now, starting from the last index of the array, we will check if the summation of ith index to last index is equal to 3 or not. If it is 3, then we found one suffix position where we can have one part of the three parts. We will add 1 into that position of the suffix count array. The suffix count array will be: {0, 0, 0, 1, 1}
  4. Now, we will do cumulative sum of the suffix count array to get the number of combination suffix part can be made at a particular position. The final suffix count array will be: {2, 2, 2, 2, 1}
  5. Now, we will start with the original array and find the prefix part which will be equal to 3. We will find that in the 2nd index. Now, from the second index, we will go to the 4th (prefix index + 2) index for number of suffix part. As we said before, we will have one middle part as well. Now, the answer will be increased by 2.
  6. The final answer will be 2 as there are no prefix part present after index 2 which will be equal to 3.

My solution: https://github.com/setu1421/programming-revamp/blob/master/InterviewBit/Arrays/Partitions.cpp

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