1

I'm reading the book named "Advanced C and C++ compiling", by Milan Stevanovic

The following is the snapshot from the book, followed by the problem I'm facing.


Concept illustration: Demo Project

The development environment used to build this simple project will be based on the gcc compiler running on Linux. Listings 2-1 through 2-3 contain the code used in the demo project.

Listing 2-1. function.h

#pragma once
#define FIRST_OPTION
#ifdef FIRST_OPTION
#define MULTIPLIER (3.0)
#else
#define MULTIPLIER (2.0)
#endif

float add_and_multiply(float x, float y);

Listing 2-2. function.c

int nCompletionStatus = 0;
float add(float x, float y)
{
    float z = x + y;
    return z;
}
float add_and_multiply(float x, float y)
{
    float z = add(x,y);
    z *= MULTIPLIER;
    return z;
}

Listing 2-3. main.c

#include "function.h"
extern int nCompletionStatus = 0;
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    float x = 1.0;
    float y = 5.0;
    float z;
    z = add_and_multiply(x,y);
    nCompletionStatus = 1;
    return 0;
}

Demo Project Preprocessing Example:

The gcc compiler provides the mode in which only the preprocessing stage is performed on the input source files:

gcc -i <input file> -o <output preprocessed file>.i

Unless specified otherwise, the output of the preprocessor is the file that has the same name as the input file and whose file extension is .i. The result of running the preprocessor on the file function.clooks like that in Listing 2-4.

Listing 2-4. function.i

# 1 "function.c"
# 1 "
# 1 "
# 1 "function.h" 1
# 11 "function.h"
float add_and_multiply(float x, float y);
# 2 "function.c" 2
int nCompletionStatus = 0;
float add(float x, float y)
{
    float z = x + y;
    return z;
}
float add_and_multiply(float x, float y)
{
    float z = add(x,y);
    z *= MULTIPLIER;
    return z;
}

More compact and more meaningful preprocessor output may be obtained if few extra flags are passed to the gcc, like

gcc -E -P -i <input file> -o <output preprocessed file>.i

which results in the preprocessed file seen in Listing 2-5.

Listing 2-5. function.i (Trimmed Down Version)

float add_and_multiply(float x, float y);
int nCompletionStatus = 0;
float add(float x, float y)
{
    float z = x + y;
    return z;
}
float add_and_multiply(float x, float y)
{
    float z = add(x,y);
    z *= 3.0;
    return z;
}

Obviously, the preprocessor replaced the symbol MULTIPLIER, whose actual value, based on the fact that the USE_FIRST_OPTION variable was defined, ended up being 3.0.


Problem:

When I compile the program as is using gcc, following is the error I am facing Snapshot from my terminal.

gcc -i function.c -o function.i
cc1: error: unrecognized command line option '-i'

gcc function.c -o function.i
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crt1.o:
In function '_start':
(.text+0x18): undefined reference to 'main'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

$pwd
/home/adminuser/advance_compiling
$ll
total 20
drwxrwxr-x  2 adminuser adminuser 4096 Jan 10 23:51 ./
drwxr-xr-x 26 adminuser adminuser 4096 Jan 10 23:57 ../
-rw-rw-r--  1 adminuser adminuser  216 Nov 15 08:58 function.c
-rw-rw-r--  1 adminuser adminuser  163 Jan 10 23:33 function.h
-rw-rw-r--  1 adminuser adminuser  257 Dec 28 06:46 main.c

How do I get rid of this and proceed in learning the course? Please suggest.

5
  • is this gcc -E -P -i <input file> -o <output preprocessed file>.i really from the book? Jan 13, 2015 at 20:44
  • You just missed a great opportunity to learn how to look up the right flag to use.
    – Jongware
    Jan 13, 2015 at 20:56
  • Yes gcc -E -P -i <input file> -o <output preprocessed file>is from the book?
    – TheLearner
    Jan 13, 2015 at 21:03
  • 1
    You should have tried gcc --help and man gcc or reading Invoking GCC - faster than asking a question here Jan 13, 2015 at 21:28
  • 1
    It is in the book indeed, it's probably an error. Jan 13, 2015 at 21:34

5 Answers 5

7

-i is not a valid command line option - I'm not sure where the book got it from. In order to just run the preprocessor, you should use the option -E instead.

7
  • maybe book uses different compiler than gcc
    – Slava
    Jan 13, 2015 at 20:40
  • That was my first thought, but the text in the question seems to be directly quoted from the book.
    – Katie
    Jan 13, 2015 at 20:41
  • I got confused because the OP posted the preprocessed file, I thought he wanted to compile the code, not to run the preprocessor on it, I thought he succeeded in that step, but anyway where did the -i come from? if it's from the book, may be it was valid in previous versions of gcc. Jan 13, 2015 at 20:47
  • I just looked it up in Google Books, and that is definitely a direct quote from the book. It was published less than a year ago too, so an old version of GCC isn't to blame. (Not that I think they would have changed a major flag like that anyways.) Who knows...
    – Katie
    Jan 13, 2015 at 20:51
  • 1
    That's kinda what I am leaning towards, without reading more of the book to see if it explains how the environment was set up. Very sloppy for a textbook though. I noticed that the publisher's page has a way to submit errata, maybe I'll comment there later.
    – Katie
    Jan 13, 2015 at 20:58
2

I was a technical reviewer of the book and the author asked me to post this explanation on his behalf:

The error you found is indeed an error, introduced in the very late stage of book proofreading/editing. Sorry for stepping on it + for book errata still not being printed out (will happen some time soon).

1
  • Is the book errata available now? Nov 27, 2015 at 14:51
0

Try this

gcc -E -P function.c -o function.i

without the -i option, it's not a gcc option.

note: this answer was fixed after I realized that have misunderstood the question, so i fixed to keep it and not delete it, but Katie did answer it before I did.

0

Judging by the .i output file in the book's example, it seems the error is in the utility itself.

Instead of using gcc, use cpp. gcc uses cpp (The C Preprocessor) under the hood to handle macro expansion and header inclusion. The output of cpp is a .i file for c source code and .ii for c++.

cpp function.c > function.i
-3

Try the following code:

function.c

#include "function.h"
int nCompletionStatus = 0;
float add(float x, float y)
{
    float z = x + y;
    return z;
}
float add_and_multiply(float x, float y)
{
    float z = add(x,y);
    z *= MULTIPLIER;
    return z;
}

main.c

    //#include "function.h"
    extern int nCompletionStatus;
    int main(int argc, char* argv[])
    {
        float x = 1.0;
        float y = 5.0;
        float z;
        z = add_and_multiply(x,y);
        nCompletionStatus = 1;
        return 0;
    }

Now execute:
gcc function.c main.c

otherwise 
gcc -c function.c
gcc function.o main.c

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