2

I have a jar, build-plugins.jar with a gradle plugin that is build with this in build.gradle:

apply plugin 'java'
    dependencies {
    compile gradleApi()
       compile localGroovy()
       compile('eviware:maven-soapui-plugin:4.5.1')
       compile('org.antlr:stringtemplate:4.0.2')
       compile('commons-io:commons-io:2.4')
       compile('joda-time:joda-time:2.1')
    }

This builds build-plugins.jar. And the project that consumes the plugin references the plugin jar by file

apply plugin 'thepluginwahoo'
buildscript {
dependencies {
        classpath 'org.jfrog.buildinfo:build-info-extractor-gradle:2.2.1'
        classpath files('/path/to/build-plugins.jar')
    }
}

The problem is when I run any task of the second project, I get "class proxy could not be created for class xyz" with the root cause being that the four dependencies (joda-time, commons-io, stringtemplate, maven-soapui-plugin) are not there. If I add the dependencies to the plugin-consuming project then it works just fine:

apply plugin 'thepluginwahoo'
buildscript {
    dependencies {
        classpath 'org.jfrog.buildinfo:build-info-extractor-gradle:2.2.1'
        classpath files('/path/to/build-plugins.jar')
        classpath 'eviware:maven-soapui-plugin:4.5.1'
        classpath 'org.antlr:stringtemplate:4.0.2'
        classpath 'joda-time:joda-time:2.1'
        classpath 'commons-io:commons-io:2.4'
    }

}

My question is why don't the classes of the "compile" dependencies in the plugin project appear in the plugin-consuming project when the jar is included in the classpath of the buildscript of the plugin-consuming project.

3

Jars typically do not contain their dependencies. Instead, they are published to a repository along with some kind of metadata descriptor (pom.xml or ivy.xml) which describes the artifact's dependencies. When you refer to the jar file directly as a dependency, Gradle has no way of knowing what its transitive dependencies are. You have a couple of ways to deal with this:

  1. Publish your plugin jar to a repository, along with the necessary metadata (which Gradle will do for you) and bring it in as an external module dependency
  2. Explicitly declare the plugin's transitive dependencies using a client module dependency.
  3. Use something like the Gradle fatjar or shadow plugins to bundle dependencies within your jar.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.