9

I have an array with arrays in it, where I want to sort the outer arrays based on values in a specific column in the inner.

I bet that sounded more than a bit confusing, so I'll skip straight to an example.

Initial data:

var data = [
  [
    "row_1-col1",
    "2-row_1-col2",
    "c-row_1-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_2-col1",
    "1-row_2-col2",
    "b-row_2-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_m-col1",
    "3-row_m-col2",
    "a-row_m-coln"
  ]
];

Sort data, based on column with index 1

data.sortFuncOfSomeKind(1);

where the object then would look like this;

var data = [
  [
    "row_2-col1",
    "1-row_2-col2",
    "b-row_2-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_1-col1",
    "2-row_1-col2",
    "c-row_1-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_m-col1",
    "3-row_m-col2",
    "a-row_m-coln"
  ]
];

Sort data, based on column with index 2

data.sortFuncOfSomeKind(2);

where the object then would look like this;

var data = [
  [
    "row_m-col1",
    "3-row_m-col2",
    "a-row_m-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_2-col1",
    "1-row_2-col2",
    "b-row_2-coln"
  ],
  [
    "row_1-col1",
    "2-row_1-col2",
    "c-row_1-coln"
  ]
];

The big Q

Is there an existing solution to this that you know of, or would I have to write one myself? If so, which would be the easiest sort algorithm to use? QuickSort?

_L

13

Array#sort (see section 15.4.4.11 of the spec, or MDC) accepts an optional function parameter which will be used to compare two entries for sorting purposes. The function should return -1 if the first argument is "less than" the second, 0 if they're equal, or 1 if the first is "greater than" the second. So:

outerArray.sort(function(a, b) {
    var valueA, valueB;

    valueA = a[1]; // Where 1 is your index, from your example
    valueB = b[1];
    if (valueA < valueB) {
        return -1;
    }
    else if (valueA > valueB) {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
});

(You can obviously compress that code a bit; I've kept it verbose for clarity.)

7

Here is a solution not needing a separate variable to contain the index

var arr = [.....]
arr.sort((function(index){
    return function(a, b){
        return (a[index] === b[index] ? 0 : (a[index] < b[index] ? -1 : 1));
    };
})(2)); // 2 is the index

This sorts on index 2

  • 1
    You should change that = to ===. Comparisons don't like to be mistaken for assignments. – awgy May 8 '10 at 12:49
  • Well, change it to == or === depending on your needs. – T.J. Crowder May 8 '10 at 13:12
  • yep, a small bug there - fixed now – Sean Kinsey May 8 '10 at 15:06
  • I tend to suggest === as a result of some advice from Douglas Crockford: "It is almost always better to use the === and !== operators. The == and != operators do type coercion. In particular, do not use == to compare against falsy values." But I agree that there are instances where the type coercion may be desired. (See: javascript.crockford.com/code.html) – awgy May 8 '10 at 16:05
  • @awgy: In this case, though, it probably makes more sense to use == -- because > and < do type conversion, too, so if you use === in his code above, you'll return 1 incorrectly if the values are == but not ===. – T.J. Crowder May 8 '10 at 17:00
1

Here used to be a sort implementation that returned the result of a simple x<y comparison. This solution is disencouraged and this post is left only to preserve the ensuing discussion.

  • D'oh. I didn't know you could just return x[a] > y[a] for a comparison value like that. That'll save me a few lines of code. – awgy May 8 '10 at 11:28
  • @David: You're returning true or false. You need to return -1, 0, or 1. (I did check, in case there was some Really Cool Thing I was missing, but the above fails to sort correctly in all cases.) – T.J. Crowder May 8 '10 at 11:32
  • @T.J.Crowder: when i run that code, it correctly outputs 'one - three - two', 'two - three - one', 'one - three - two'. just the output you'd expect from an alphabetical sort. is that not the result you're seeing? jsbin.com/ovoze3 – David Hedlund May 8 '10 at 11:44
  • @T.J. Crowder: furthermore: mine - jsbin.com/ovoze3/edit yours - jsbin.com/ovoze3/2/edit . hit "preview" > "go" in them, and they'll produce exactly the same result – David Hedlund May 8 '10 at 11:48
  • 1
    @David: See section 15.4.4.11 of the 5th ed. spec (ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.htm): The compare function "...should be a function that accepts two arguments x and y and returns a negative value if x < y, zero if x = y, or a positive value if x > y." and section 11.8.5 (about >): "The comparison...produces true, false, or undefined (which indicates that at least one operand is NaN)." Returning true or false out of the function therefore results in undefined behavior, and as the function must have three possible outcomes, incorrect behavior. – T.J. Crowder May 8 '10 at 12:25

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