229

I have a Boolean variable which I want to convert to a string:

$res = true;

I need the converted value to be of the format: "true" "false", not "0" "1"

$converted_res = "true";
$converted_res = "false";

I've tried:

$converted_res = string($res);
$converted_res = String($res);

But it tells me that string and String are not recognized functions.
How do I convert this Boolean to a string in the format of "true" or "false" in PHP?

  • 1
    Newer use function ( (string) $param[boolean type] ){ if($param){....} } because (string) false => "false" is not false... – zloctb Oct 29 '15 at 8:54

15 Answers 15

350

Simplest solution:

$converted_res = $res ? 'true' : 'false';

  • 1
    This is the easyest way to do it, but it depends on what you need it for it might not be the best sulution. – Androme May 8 '10 at 18:43
  • 1
    @DoomStone I know it's been 3 years, but I just wanted to know what makes you think in some cases it's not the best solution. The ?: notation is the most simplified code we can come up with in this situation. – caiosm1005 Jul 14 '13 at 23:39
  • 1
    For example for me, it is not the best solution for the case at hand: I am not sure what the type of the return value is; it may be boolean or something else. (Calling a function someone else wrote during debugging.) Your solution converts $res to boolean, whereas var_export can handle all possible types. – user2443147 Jun 15 '14 at 18:47
  • 13
    @user2443147 the type being boolean is literally the first fact mentioned in the question. If you are not sure about the type you are dealing with, you have a whole other set of problems to begin with. – nem75 May 20 '15 at 6:01
  • 3
    Note that you need extra brackets when you mix ternary operator and string concatenation. echo '<active>' . $res ? 'true' : 'false' . '</active>'; does not produce desired result, echo '<active>' . ($res ? 'true' : 'false') . '</active>'; does. – Salman A Mar 5 '18 at 8:33
189

The function var_export returns a string representation of a variable, so you could do this:

var_export($res, true);

The second argument tells the function to return the string instead of echoing it.

  • Perfect answer. This is the "PHP" way of getting a "...a parsable string representation of a variable" – peterchaula Sep 30 '19 at 8:17
58

Another way to do : json_encode( booleanValue )

echo json_encode(true);  // string "true"

echo json_encode(false); // string "false"

// null !== false
echo json_encode(null);  // string "null"
  • 6
    I think semantically using var_export() is more in-keeping with the intent of the operation (unless one is needing the string for some JSON, that is ;-) – Adam Cameron Mar 3 '16 at 9:42
  • 3
    This really relies on the side-effect that the JSON representation happens to be the same as what is wanted. It also relies on the JSON extension being installed and enabled, which might be very likely but isn't a given. So imho this isn't a clean solution. – Nick Rice Apr 29 '16 at 21:53
36

See var_export

  • 3
    See Christian's answer for more detail. Specifically, include the second argument (true). – Jimothy May 22 '13 at 17:37
  • This is a "link-only" answer, which does not meed SO guidelines for an "Answer". Please edit to include relevant info from the link into your post. While the information is useful, it is more appropriately left as a "Comment" to the OP. All necessary information from the link must be embedded in the answer. 1) If the link were to become unreachable, this post would become useless. 2) visitors should not be required to visit external links, only to figure it out themselves. That said, links to documentation, sources, or additional info is highly encouraged. Thanks for your contribution. – SherylHohman Mar 1 at 20:29
11

You use strval() or (string) to convert to string in PHP. However, that does not convert boolean into the actual spelling of "true" or "false" so you must do that by yourself. Here's an example function:

function strbool($value)
{
    return $value ? 'true' : 'false';
}
echo strbool(false); // "false"
echo strbool(true); // "true"
  • If $val = true; then strval($val) and (string) $val both return 1. – ABach May 8 '10 at 18:34
9

The other solutions here all have caveats (though they address the question at hand). If you are (1) looping over mixed-types or (2) want a generic solution that you can export as a function or include in your utilities, none of the other solutions here will work.

The simplest and most self-explanatory solution is:

// simplest, most-readable
if (is_bool($res) {
    $res = $res ? 'true' : 'false';
}

// same as above but written more tersely
$res = is_bool($res) ? ($res ? 'true' : 'false') : $res;

// Terser still, but completely unnecessary  function call and must be
// commented due to poor readability. What is var_export? What is its
// second arg? Why are we exporting stuff?
$res = is_bool($res) ? var_export($res, 1) : $res;

But most developers reading your code will require a trip to http://php.net/var_export to understand what the var_export does and what the second param is.

1. var_export

Works for boolean input but converts everything else to a string as well.

// OK
var_export(false, 1); // 'false'
// OK
var_export(true, 1);  // 'true'
// NOT OK
var_export('', 1);  // '\'\''
// NOT OK
var_export(1, 1);  // '1'

2. ($res) ? 'true' : 'false';

Works for boolean input but converts everything else (ints, strings) to true/false.

// OK
true ? 'true' : 'false' // 'true'
// OK
false ? 'true' : 'false' // 'false'
// NOT OK
'' ? 'true' : 'false' // 'false'
// NOT OK
0 ? 'true' : 'false' // 'false'

3. json_encode()

Same issues as var_export and probably worse since json_encode cannot know if the string true was intended a string or a boolean.

  • var_export() seems to be the best for the specific use case, thanks. – Dr. Gianluigi Zane Zanettini Dec 10 '15 at 9:51
  • For PHP 5.5+ installations, var_export(boolval($var), true) is a safe way route to transform the value into the strings "true" or "false". – faintsignal Nov 1 '16 at 15:29
  • if (is_bool($res) { $res = $res ? 'true' : 'false'; } << this won't work - missing ) perhaps its better to use $result = (is_bool($var) && $var) ? 'true' : 'false'; – mtizziani Feb 6 '17 at 11:18
  • @aleemb What about: $value = is_bool($value) ? var_export($value, true) : $value; This way I live the value intact and only change the boolean to their string representation. – dickwan Mar 14 '17 at 19:56
  • In your fist line of code, you have: $res = $res ?? Did you mean: $res == $res? Or even: $res === $res? – SherylHohman Mar 1 at 20:11
2

Why just don't do like this?:

if ($res) {
    $converted_res = "true";
}
else {
    $converted_res = "false";
}
1

boolval() works for complicated tables where declaring variables and adding loops and filters do not work. Example:

$result[$row['name'] . "</td><td>" . (boolval($row['special_case']) ? 'True' : 'False') . "</td><td>" . $row['more_fields'] = $tmp

where $tmp is a key used in order to transpose other data. Here, I wanted the table to display "Yes" for 1 and nothing for 0, so used (boolval($row['special_case']) ? 'Yes' : '').

  • When does boolval(some_expression) ? .. : .. behave differently than some_expression ? .. : ..? – ToolmakerSteve Feb 25 '19 at 2:23
1

This works also for any kind of value:

$a = true;

echo $a                     // outputs:   1
echo value_To_String( $a )  // outputs:   true

code:

function valueToString( $value ){ 
    return ( !is_bool( $value ) ?  $value : ($value ? 'true' : 'false' )  ); 
}
1

For me, I wanted a string representation unless it was null, in which case I wanted it to remain null.

The problem with var_export is it converts null to a string "NULL" and it also converts an empty string to "''", which is undesirable. There was no easy solution that I could find.

This was the code I finally used:

if (is_bool($val)) $val ? $val = "true" : $val = "false";
else if ($val !== null) $val = (string)$val;

Short and simple and easy to throw in a function too if you prefer.

1

Edited based on @sebastian-norr suggestion pointing out that the $bool variable may or may not be a true 0 or 1. For example, 2 resolves to true when running it through a Boolean test in PHP.

As a solution, I have used type casting to ensure that we convert $bool to 0 or 1.
But I have to admit that the simple expression $bool ? 'true' : 'false' is way cleaner.

My solution used below should never be used, LOL.
Here is why not...

To avoid repetition, the array containing the string representation of the Boolean can be stored in a constant that can be made available throughout the application.

// Make this constant available everywhere in the application
const BOOLEANS = ['true', 'false'];

$bool = true;
echo BOOLEANS[(bool)  $bool]; // 'true'
echo BOOLEANS[(bool) !$bool]; // 'false'
0

I'm not a fan of the accepted answer as it converts anything which evaluates to false to "false" no just boolean and vis-versa.

Anyway here's my O.T.T answer, it uses the var_export function.

var_export works with all variable types except resource, I have created a function which will perform a regular cast to string ((string)), a strict cast (var_export) and a type check, depending on the arguments provided..

if(!function_exists('to_string')){

    function to_string($var, $strict = false, $expectedtype = null){

        if(!func_num_args()){
            return trigger_error(__FUNCTION__ . '() expects at least 1 parameter, 0 given', E_USER_WARNING);
        }
        if($expectedtype !== null  && gettype($var) !== $expectedtype){
            return trigger_error(__FUNCTION__ . '() expects parameter 1 to be ' . $expectedtype .', ' . gettype($var) . ' given', E_USER_WARNING);
        }
        if(is_string($var)){
            return $var;
        }
        if($strict && !is_resource($var)){
            return var_export($var, true);
        }
        return (string) $var;
    }
}

if(!function_exists('bool_to_string')){

    function bool_to_string($var){
        return func_num_args() ? to_string($var, true, 'boolean') : to_string();        
    }
}

if(!function_exists('object_to_string')){

    function object_to_string($var){
        return func_num_args() ? to_string($var, true, 'object') : to_string();        
    }
}

if(!function_exists('array_to_string')){

    function array_to_string($var){
        return func_num_args() ? to_string($var, true, 'array') : to_string();        
    }
}
0
$converted_res = isset ( $res ) ? ( $res ? 'true' : 'false' ) : 'false';
  • isset not necessary here. In php, if-test is false for both null and variable not defined. Can simply do $converted_res = ( $res ? 'true' : 'false' ); as seen in older answers. – ToolmakerSteve Feb 25 '19 at 2:20
0
function ToStr($Val=null,$T=0){

    return is_string($Val)?"$Val"
    :
    (
        is_numeric($Val)?($T?"$Val":$Val)
        :
        (
            is_null($Val)?"NULL"
            :
            (
                is_bool($Val)?($Val?"TRUE":"FALSE")
                :
                (
                    is_array($Val)?@StrArr($Val,$T)
                    :
                    false
                )
            )
        )
    );

}
function StrArr($Arr,$T=0)
{
    $Str="";
    $i=-1;
    if(is_array($Arr))
    foreach($Arr AS $K => $V)
    $Str.=((++$i)?", ":null).(is_string($K)?"\"$K\"":$K)." => ".(is_string($V)?"\"$V\"":@ToStr($V,$T+1));
    return "array( ".($i?@ToStr($Arr):$Str)." )".($T?null:";");
}

$A = array(1,2,array('a'=>'b'),array('a','b','c'),true,false,ToStr(100));
echo StrArr($A); // OR ToStr($A) // OR ToStr(true) // OR StrArr(true)
-2

Just wanted to update, in PHP >= 5.50 you can do boolval() to do the same thing

Reference Here.

  • 3
    This is the same as using (bool) $var; – Al.G. Jul 7 '15 at 10:17
  • Thank you! This worked for me in a complicated table. Used it like this: "<td>" . (boolval($row['special_case']) ? 'Yes' : ' ') . "</td>" – motorbaby Jan 3 '17 at 1:07
  • 4
    boolval() goes the other way, converting a variable of any type to bool, not bool to string. – Mike Chamberlain May 15 '17 at 2:59

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