2

I've got a class in TypeScript that makes an Ajax call to a service and then gets a JSON object in return; very standard stuff. I'd like for the success handler for the Ajax call to accept the incoming JSON as an instantiated class defined in TypeScript, i.e. I'm going for strongly typed Ajax here. This mostly works. I've found that I can receive the incoming data just fine, but any members of the class (both properties and methods) that are not in the JSON response are not present on the object at runtime. Here's some code to demo the problem.

module Samples {

    export class MyData {
        public A: number;
        public B: number;
        public get C(): number { return this.A + this.B; }
    }

    export class ClassDemo {
        constructor(){

            var ajaxSettings: JQueryAjaxSettings = {
                url: "/api/build/sample",  // Returns {"A":6,"B":4}
                type: "GET",
                dataType: "json",
                cache: false
            };

            var jqXhr: JQueryXHR = $.ajax(ajaxSettings);
            jqXhr.done(this.loadSucceeded);
            jqXhr.fail( /* ... */);
        }

        private loadSucceeded(data: MyData, text: string, jqXhr: JQueryXHR) {

            // 
            // Displays "6 + 4 = undefined"
            //
            alert(data.A + " + " + data.B + " = " + data.C);
        }
    }
}

var sample = new Samples.ClassDemo();

I suppose this makes sense since it's JQuery creating the object in JavaScript at runtime, not TypeScript, so JQuery would have no way of knowing about the additional members in the TypeScript class. I'm just wondering if there is some good way around this? For obvious reasons, I'd rather like to avoid instantiating my own class and manually copying the values from the incoming data into it.

1

I don't believe there is anything you can do to have jQuery automatically provide the value as an instance of your MyData class, instead of just a raw object. Because ultimately, all jQuery is doing is deserialising the JSON text using JSON.parse() and passing the done() callback the resulting JS object. JSON does not support saying an object is an instance of a class.

You would have to create an interceptor for the AJAX request that takes the raw object returned and constructs an instance of your class for you. This may be done individually per class/request, or you could do it globally if you had the data return the class to instantiate and every class' constructor accepted such an object. Then you could write a generic interceptor to transform the raw object into an instance of the correct class.

Of course, then your server code either has to know about the client side types, or you would have to specify the type as part of the request and return the type in the response.

1

If I simplify the example (to remove the AJAX call, but leave in the important issue of converting a simple data object into an instance of MyData), you can solve the problem by mapping the plain data to a new MyData instance.

For the example, I have used a static method. You can choose your own pattern here. Maybe you'll accept A and B as constructor argument, or use a mapper class or apply whatever pattern you feel fits best:

Static Method

module Samples {

    export class MyData {
        public A: number;
        public B: number;
        public get C(): number { return this.A + this.B; }

        public static fromJson(json: { A: number; B: number}) {
            var myData = new MyData();
            myData.A = json.A;
            myData.B = json.B;
            return myData;
        }
    }

    export class ClassDemo {
        constructor(){
            var result = { A: 1, B: 2};
            this.loadSucceeded(MyData.fromJson(result));
        }

        private loadSucceeded(data: MyData) {
            alert(data.A + " + " + data.B + " = " + data.C);
        }
    }
}

var sample = new Samples.ClassDemo();

Constructor

module Samples {

    export class MyData {
        constructor(public A: number, public B:number){}

        public get C(): number { return this.A + this.B; }
    }

    export class ClassDemo {
        constructor(){
            var result = { A: 1, B: 2};
            this.loadSucceeded(new MyData(result.A, result.B));
        }

        private loadSucceeded(data: MyData) {
            alert(data.A + " + " + data.B + " = " + data.C);
        }
    }
}

var sample = new Samples.ClassDemo();

You could even automatically map the properties to a new instance by looking for matching properties in the "left" and "right" hand arguments of any two objects, although this would be rather more abstract than a plain mapping.

0

Thanks for everyone's explanations and suggestions. I think I ended up going with a hybrid of all of them, which is why I'm providing my own answer.

I've got the pattern I described going on in a few places in my real code and all of classes involved have more than just two members. At this stage of development they are also subject to change so it made sense to create a generic helper class to map member values from one object to another. It also made sense in my scenario to invoke this mapper as part of the constructor because some of the classes have some additional setup actions. The constructors now take an optional argument of an existing instance of the class to copy data from.

Here's how it turned out. The last demonstration case is the pattern that gets used most often in my code.

module Samples {

    export class Helpers {
        public static Recreate<T>(typeT: { new (): T; }, sourceObj: T, targetObj?: T) {

            if (targetObj == null) {
                targetObj = new typeT();
            }

            for (var property in sourceObj) {
                targetObj[property] = sourceObj[property];
            }

            return targetObj;
        }
    }

    export class MyData {

        constructor(fromObj?: MyData) {
            this.C = 0;

            if (fromObj != null) {
                Helpers.Recreate(MyData, fromObj, this);
            }

            this.C += 2;
        }

        public A: number;
        public B: number;
        public C: number;
        public get D(): number { return this.A + this.B + this.C; }
    }

    export class ClassDemo {
        constructor() {

            var ajaxSettings: JQueryAjaxSettings = {
                url: "/api/build/sample", // Returns {"A":6,"B":4}
                type: "GET",
                dataType: "json",
                cache: false
            };

            var jqXhr: JQueryXHR = $.ajax(ajaxSettings);
            jqXhr.done(this.loadSucceeded);
            jqXhr.fail( /* ... */);
        }

        private loadSucceeded(data: MyData, text: string, jqXhr: JQueryXHR) {

            // Illustrates the problem that MyData.C and MyData.D are undefined even though the type is in the signature
            // Displays "6 + 4 + undefined = undefined"
            alert(data.A + " + " + data.B + " + " + data.C + " = " + data.D);

            // The default output for a brand new MyData object; undefined and NaN values are as expected
            // Displays "undefined + undefined + 2 = NaN"
            var plainData: MyData = new MyData();
            alert(plainData.A + " + " + plainData.B + " + " + plainData.C + " = " + plainData.D);

            // This creates a real instance of MyData using the helper method directly and produces the right output
            // Displays "6 + 4 + 2 = 12"
            var recreatedData: MyData = Helpers.Recreate(MyData, data);
            alert(recreatedData.A + " + " + recreatedData.B + " + " + recreatedData.C + " = " + recreatedData.D);

            // This uses the helper method located in the constructor to rebuild 'data' from itself and produces the right output
            // Displays "6 + 4 + 2 = 12"
            data = new MyData(data);
            alert(data.A + " + " + data.B + " + " + data.C + " = " + data.D);
        }
    }
}

var sample = new Samples.ClassDemo();

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