830

What is the idiomatic Python equivalent of this C/C++ code?

void foo()
{
    static int counter = 0;
    counter++;
    printf("counter is %d\n", counter);
}

specifically, how does one implement the static member at the function level, as opposed to the class level? And does placing the function into a class change anything?

4
  • 37
    There is NO equivalence I am afraid. Even if you do the decorator hack with function attributes, you will be able to access the variable outside, which kinda defeats the point, sadly. Moreover, you will have to hard code the function name in the function, which is very annoying. I would suggest to use a class or module global variables instead with the conventional _ prefix. Commented Sep 3, 2014 at 10:07
  • 17
    For non-C-programmers, [stackoverflow.com/questions/5033627/… static variable inside a function is only visible inside that function's scope, but its lifetime is the entire life of the program, and it's only initialized once). Basically, a persistent counter or storage variable that lives between function calls.
    – smci
    Commented Jun 1, 2018 at 8:28
  • 2
    @lpapp: there kind-of is, it's a class member. You are correct that we can't prevent other code viewing it or changing it.
    – smci
    Commented Jun 1, 2018 at 8:37
  • I found answer given by Claudiu useful. Commented Nov 2, 2021 at 20:26

31 Answers 31

872

A bit reversed, but this should work:

def foo():
    foo.counter += 1
    print "Counter is %d" % foo.counter
foo.counter = 0

If you want the counter initialization code at the top instead of the bottom, you can create a decorator:

def static_vars(**kwargs):
    def decorate(func):
        for k in kwargs:
            setattr(func, k, kwargs[k])
        return func
    return decorate

Then use the code like this:

@static_vars(counter=0)
def foo():
    foo.counter += 1
    print "Counter is %d" % foo.counter

It'll still require you to use the foo. prefix, unfortunately.

(Credit: @ony)

10
  • 32
    there is only one instance of foo - this one function. all invocations access the same variable.
    – Claudiu
    Commented Nov 10, 2008 at 23:49
  • 162
    Sorry for digging this up, but I'd rather put if "counter" not in foo.__dict__: foo.counter = 0 as the first lines of foo(). This would help to avoid code outside the function. Not sure if this was possible back in 2008 though. P.S. Found this answer while searching for possibility to create static function variables, so this thread is still "alive" :)
    – binaryLV
    Commented Aug 9, 2012 at 6:30
  • 12
    @binaryLV: I'd probably prefer that to the first approach. The problem with the first approach is it isn't immediately obvious that foo and foo.counter = are intimately related. however, I ultimately prefer the decorator approach, as there's no way the decorator will not be called and it is semantically more obvious what it does (@static_var("counter", 0) is easier on & makes more sense to my eyes than if "counter" not in foo.__dict__: foo.counter = 0, especially as in the latter you have to use the function name (twice) which might change).
    – Claudiu
    Commented Mar 1, 2013 at 19:31
  • 7
    @lpapp: It depends on what the point of static variables is. I always thought it was that it would be the same value across multiple function calls, which this does satisfy. I never took it to be about variable hiding, which this doesn't, as you said.
    – Claudiu
    Commented Sep 3, 2014 at 14:25
  • 12
    def foo(): if not hasattr(foo,"counter"): foo.counter=0 foo.counter += 1 Commented Jan 3, 2017 at 17:41
295

You can add attributes to a function, and use it as a static variable.

def myfunc():
  myfunc.counter += 1
  print myfunc.counter

# attribute must be initialized
myfunc.counter = 0

Alternatively, if you don't want to setup the variable outside the function, you can use hasattr() to avoid an AttributeError exception:

def myfunc():
  if not hasattr(myfunc, "counter"):
     myfunc.counter = 0  # it doesn't exist yet, so initialize it
  myfunc.counter += 1

Anyway static variables are rather rare, and you should find a better place for this variable, most likely inside a class.

7
  • 9
    Why not try instead of if statement?
    – rav
    Commented Dec 1, 2013 at 15:01
  • 15
    try: myfunc.counter += 1; except AttributeError: myfunc.counter = 1 should do the same, using exceptions instead.
    – sleblanc
    Commented Dec 10, 2013 at 4:31
  • 4
    Exceptions ought to be used for Exceptional situations, i.e. ones the programmer expects will not happen, such as an input file it had successfully opened suddenly not being available. This is an expected situation, an if statement makes more sense.
    – Hack Saw
    Commented Jan 15, 2014 at 7:51
  • 17
    @Hack_Saw: Well, this is Pythonic (better to ask for forgiveness than permission). This is actually recommended in Python optimization techniques since it saves the cost of an if (though I'm not recommending premature optimization). Your rule about exceptional cases: 1. Failure IS an exceptional case here, in a sense. It only happens once. 2. I think that rule is about using (i.e. raising) exceptions. This is catching an exception for something you expect to work but have a backup plan for, which is a common thing in most languages.
    – leewz
    Commented Jan 17, 2014 at 23:42
  • 3
    @leewangzhong: Does enclosing a block that doesn't raise an exception within try add any cost? Just curious.
    – trss
    Commented Jul 23, 2014 at 20:04
268

One could also consider:

def foo():
    try:
        foo.counter += 1
    except AttributeError:
        foo.counter = 1

Reasoning:

  • much pythonic ("ask for forgiveness not permission")
  • use exception (thrown only once) instead of if branch (think StopIteration exception)
5
  • 12
    I haven't been doing Python long, but this satisfies one of the implicit tenements of the language: if it's not (fairly) easy, you're doing it wrong.
    – ZX9
    Commented Sep 21, 2016 at 17:19
  • 2
    Did not work immediately with class methods, "self.foo.counter = 1" raises AttributeError again.
    – villasv
    Commented Oct 14, 2016 at 21:10
  • 23
    This is the correct solution and it should be the accepted answer because the initialisation code will be run when the function is called and not when the module is executed or when something from it is imported, which is the case if you use the decorator approach from the currently accepted answer. See Python decorator function execution. If you have a huge library module then every decorator will be run, including those of functions you do not import. Commented May 8, 2017 at 9:48
  • 6
    A simpler approach : def fn(): if not hasattr(fn, 'c'): fn.c = 0 fn.c += 1 return fn.c
    – MANU
    Commented Dec 18, 2017 at 5:12
  • 12
    @MANU Using hasattr() for this is not simpler and also less efficient.
    – moooeeeep
    Commented Feb 8, 2019 at 11:39
82

Many people have already suggested testing 'hasattr', but there's a simpler answer:

def func():
    func.counter = getattr(func, 'counter', 0) + 1

No try/except, no testing hasattr, just getattr with a default.

4
  • 5
    pay attention to the third parm of getattr when you put a func there for example: def func(): def foo(): return 1112 func.counter = getattr(func, 'counter', foo()) + 1 when you call func,the foo will always be called!
    – Codefor
    Commented Nov 19, 2015 at 10:36
  • 4
    Just a call to getattr every time that func gets called. That's fine if performance isn't an issue, if it is try/except will win hands down. Commented Feb 18, 2018 at 0:20
  • 12
    @MarkLawrence: Actually, at least on my Windows x64 3.8.0 install, the performance difference between this answer and ravwojdyla's equivalent try/except based approach is pretty meaningless. A simple ipython %%timeit microbenchmark gave the cost of the try/except at 255 ns per call, vs. 263 ns for the getattr based solution. Yes, the try/except is faster, but it's not exactly "winning hands down"; it's a tiny micro-optimization. Write whatever code seems clearer, don't worry about trivial performance differences like this. Commented Dec 28, 2019 at 2:47
  • 3
    @ShadowRanger thanks for benchmarking that. I've been wondering about MarkLawrence's statement for 2 years, and I'm very happy you did the research. I definitely agree with your final sentence - "write whatever code seems clearer" - that's exactly why I wrote this answer.
    – Jonathan
    Commented Feb 6, 2020 at 3:05
62

Other answers have demonstrated the way you should do this. Here's a way you shouldn't:

>>> def foo(counter=[0]):
...   counter[0] += 1
...   print("Counter is %i." % counter[0]);
... 
>>> foo()
Counter is 1.
>>> foo()
Counter is 2.
>>> 

Default values are initialized only when the function is first evaluated, not each time it is executed, so you can use a list or any other mutable object to store static values.

11
  • I tried that, but for some reason, the function parameter was initialising itself to 140, not 0. Why would this be? Commented Nov 10, 2008 at 23:58
  • 1
    @bouvard For recursive functions that need a static variable, this is the only one that really reads well. Commented Jun 5, 2017 at 16:57
  • 1
    I tried several approaches and I wish this one becomes accepted as pythonic. With some meaningfull names like def foo(arg1, arg2, _localstorage=DataClass(counter=0)) I find it well readable. Another good point is easy function renaming.
    – VPfB
    Commented Jan 30, 2018 at 12:40
  • 2
    Why do you say you shouldn't do it that way? Looks perfectly reasonable to me!
    – Konstantin
    Commented Jul 29, 2018 at 8:01
  • 2
    @VPfB: For general storage, you could use types.SimpleNamespace, making it def foo(arg1, arg2, _staticstorage=types.SimpleNamespace(counter=0)): without needing to define a special class. Commented Dec 28, 2019 at 2:25
34

Python doesn't have static variables but you can fake it by defining a callable class object and then using it as a function. Also see this answer.

class Foo(object):
  # Class variable, shared by all instances of this class
  counter = 0

  def __call__(self):
    Foo.counter += 1
    print Foo.counter

# Create an object instance of class "Foo," called "foo"
foo = Foo()

# Make calls to the "__call__" method, via the object's name itself
foo() #prints 1
foo() #prints 2
foo() #prints 3

Note that __call__ makes an instance of a class (object) callable by its own name. That's why calling foo() above calls the class' __call__ method. From the documentation:

Instances of arbitrary classes can be made callable by defining a __call__() method in their class.

7
  • 18
    Functions are already objects so this just adds an unnecessary layer.
    – DasIch
    Commented Jan 30, 2011 at 14:48
  • See this SO answer for a long opinion that this is actually a good idea. stackoverflow.com/questions/460586. I agree that making any such class a singleton, perhaps like this stackoverflow.com/questions/6760685, would also be a good idea. I don't know what @S.Lott means by "... move counter into class definition ..." because it looks like it's already in class-variable position to me.
    – Reb.Cabin
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 17:05
  • 1
    Based on my research, this class technique appears to be the most "Pythonic" of the approaches presented on this page, and uses the least trickery. I therefore plan on adopting it as my go-to replacement for C-static-like variables in functions, as a new Python developer myself. Commented Aug 14, 2016 at 22:55
  • 1
    What happens if I want foo1 = Foo() and foo2 = Foo()? Commented Feb 18, 2018 at 0:22
  • 1
    @AaronMcMillin the counter is shared between these two instances. The counter in this case is a class variable not an instance variable
    – kdubs
    Commented May 12 at 2:03
19

Use a generator function to generate an iterator.

def foo_gen():
    n = 0
    while True:
        n+=1
        yield n

Then use it like

foo = foo_gen().next
for i in range(0,10):
    print foo()

If you want an upper limit:

def foo_gen(limit=100000):
    n = 0
    while n < limit:
       n+=1
       yield n

If the iterator terminates (like the example above), you can also loop over it directly, like

for i in foo_gen(20):
    print i

Of course, in these simple cases it's better to use xrange :)

Here is the documentation on the yield statement.

0
18

Other solutions attach a counter attribute to the function, usually with convoluted logic to handle the initialization. This is inappropriate for new code.

In Python 3, the right way is to use a nonlocal statement:

counter = 0
def foo():
    nonlocal counter
    counter += 1
    print(f'counter is {counter}')

See PEP 3104 for the specification of the nonlocal statement.

If the counter is intended to be private to the module, it should be named _counter instead.

4
  • 5
    Even before Python 3, you could always do this with a global counter statement instead of nonlocal counter (nonlocal just lets you write to closure state in a nested function). The reason people are attaching an attribute to the function is to avoid polluting the global namespace for state that's specific to the function, so you don't have to do even hackier things when two functions need independent counters. This solution doesn't scale; attributes on the function do. kdb's answer is how nonlocal can help, but it does add complexity. Commented Dec 28, 2019 at 2:57
  • Eh, I think the complexity of a factory function or decorator is overkill unless you're doing this a lot, and in that case the design is already a bit smelly. For a one-off, just add the nonlocal counter and be done with it. I've added a bit to the answer about naming conventions. Also, the reason I recommend nonlocal over global is exactly as you point out -- it works in strictly more circumstances.
    – cbarrick
    Commented Jan 3, 2020 at 4:28
  • 1
    I've got this in PyCharm: Nonlocal variable '_counter' must be bound in an outer function scope
    – ishahak
    Commented May 11, 2022 at 9:04
  • @ishahak please try to create a minimal reproducible example, and then ask a new question if you cannot find an existing one. Commented Jul 3, 2022 at 7:09
13

Using an attribute of a function as static variable has some potential drawbacks:

  • Every time you want to access the variable, you have to write out the full name of the function.
  • Outside code can access the variable easily and mess with the value.

Idiomatic python for the second issue would probably be naming the variable with a leading underscore to signal that it is not meant to be accessed, while keeping it accessible after the fact.

Using closures

An alternative would be a pattern using lexical closures, which are supported with the nonlocal keyword in python 3.

def make_counter():
    i = 0
    def counter():
        nonlocal i
        i = i + 1
        return i
    return counter
counter = make_counter()

Sadly I know no way to encapsulate this solution into a decorator.

Using an internal state parameter

Another option might be an undocumented parameter serving as a mutable value container.

def counter(*, _i=[0]):
    _i[0] += 1
    return _i[0]

This works, because default arguments are evaluated when the function is defined, not when it is called.

Cleaner might be to have a container type instead of the list, e.g.

def counter(*, _i = Mutable(0)):
    _i.value += 1
    return _i.value

but I am not aware of a builtin type, that clearly communicates the purpose.

1
  • This limbo condition of the internal state parameter makes me think of C++'s hidden friend idiom.
    – 303
    Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 18:39
10
_counter = 0
def foo():
   global _counter
   _counter += 1
   print 'counter is', _counter

Python customarily uses underscores to indicate private variables. The only reason in C to declare the static variable inside the function is to hide it outside the function, which is not really idiomatic Python.

0
10

A little bit more readable, but more verbose (Zen of Python: explicit is better than implicit):

>>> def func(_static={'counter': 0}):
...     _static['counter'] += 1
...     print _static['counter']
...
>>> func()
1
>>> func()
2
>>>

See here for an explanation of how this works.

2
  • can you elaborate on why this code works? The second foo() should re-initialize the dictionary to the value specified in the function definition (so with the counter key having a value of 0). Why it does not? Commented Jul 6, 2017 at 9:49
  • 5
    @raffamaiden: Default arguments are evaluated only once when the function is defined and not each time the function is called.
    – Daniel K.
    Commented Jun 20, 2019 at 11:08
7
def staticvariables(**variables):
    def decorate(function):
        for variable in variables:
            setattr(function, variable, variables[variable])
        return function
    return decorate

@staticvariables(counter=0, bar=1)
def foo():
    print(foo.counter)
    print(foo.bar)

Much like vincent's code above, this would be used as a function decorator and static variables must be accessed with the function name as a prefix. The advantage of this code (although admittedly anyone might be smart enough to figure it out) is that you can have multiple static variables and initialise them in a more conventional manner.

0
6

After trying several approaches I ended up using an improved version of @warvariuc's answer:

import types

def func(_static=types.SimpleNamespace(counter=0)):
    _static.counter += 1
    print(_static.counter)
5

The idiomatic way is to use a class, which can have attributes. If you need instances to not be separate, use a singleton.

There are a number of ways you could fake or munge "static" variables into Python (one not mentioned so far is to have a mutable default argument), but this is not the Pythonic, idiomatic way to do it. Just use a class.

Or possibly a generator, if your usage pattern fits.

1
  • For stand-alone recursive functions, the default argument is the most elegant one. Commented Jun 5, 2017 at 17:00
5

A static variable inside a Python method

class Count:
    def foo(self):
        try: 
            self.foo.__func__.counter += 1
        except AttributeError: 
            self.foo.__func__.counter = 1

        print self.foo.__func__.counter

m = Count()
m.foo()       # 1
m.foo()       # 2
m.foo()       # 3
5

A global declaration provides this functionality. In the example below (python 3.5 or greater to use the "f"), the counter variable is defined outside of the function. Defining it as global in the function signifies that the "global" version outside of the function should be made available to the function. So each time the function runs, it modifies the value outside the function, preserving it beyond the function.

counter = 0

def foo():
    global counter
    counter += 1
    print("counter is {}".format(counter))

foo() #output: "counter is 1"
foo() #output: "counter is 2"
foo() #output: "counter is 3"
1
  • This works the same way if used correctly. The difference to the c-code is that in the OP's c example, the counter variable could only be touched by the function. A global variable in python may be used or altered anywhere in the script Commented May 11, 2019 at 10:53
5

Using a decorator and a closure

The following decorator can be used create static function variables. It replaces the declared function with the return from itself. This implies that the decorated function must return a function.

def static_inner_self(func):
    return func()

Then use the decorator on a function that returns another function with a captured variable:

@static_inner_self
def foo():
    counter = 0
    def foo():
        nonlocal counter
        counter += 1
        print(f"counter is {counter}")
    return foo

nonlocal is required, otherwise Python thinks that the counter variable is a local variable instead of a captured variable. Python behaves like that because of the variable assignment counter += 1. Any assignment in a function makes Python think that the variable is local.

If you are not assigning to the variable in the inner function, then you can ignore the nonlocal statement, for example, in this function I use to indent lines of a string, in which Python can infer that the variable is nonlocal:

@static_inner_self
def indent_lines():
    import re
    re_start_line = re.compile(r'^', flags=re.MULTILINE)
    def indent_lines(text, indent=2):
        return re_start_line.sub(" "*indent, text)
    return indent_lines

P.S. There is a deleted answer that proposed the same. I don't know why the author deleted it. https://stackoverflow.com/a/23366737/195417

4

Another (not recommended!) twist on the callable object like https://stackoverflow.com/a/279598/916373, if you don't mind using a funky call signature, would be to do

class foo(object):
    counter = 0;
    @staticmethod
    def __call__():
        foo.counter += 1
        print "counter is %i" % foo.counter

>>> foo()()
counter is 1
>>> foo()()
counter is 2
4

Instead of creating a function having a static local variable, you can always create what is called a "function object" and give it a standard (non-static) member variable.

Since you gave an example written C++, I will first explain what a "function object" is in C++. A "function object" is simply any class with an overloaded operator(). Instances of the class will behave like functions. For example, you can write int x = square(5); even if square is an object (with overloaded operator()) and not technically not a "function." You can give a function-object any of the features that you could give a class object.

# C++ function object
class Foo_class {
    private:
        int counter;     
    public:
        Foo_class() {
             counter = 0;
        }
        void operator() () {  
            counter++;
            printf("counter is %d\n", counter);
        }     
   };
   Foo_class foo;

In Python, we can also overload operator() except that the method is instead named __call__:

Here is a class definition:

class Foo_class:
    def __init__(self): # __init__ is similair to a C++ class constructor
        self.counter = 0
        # self.counter is like a static member
        # variable of a function named "foo"
    def __call__(self): # overload operator()
        self.counter += 1
        print("counter is %d" % self.counter);
foo = Foo_class() # call the constructor

Here is an example of the class being used:

from foo import foo

for i in range(0, 5):
    foo() # function call

The output printed to the console is:

counter is 1
counter is 2
counter is 3
counter is 4
counter is 5

If you want your function to take input arguments, you can add those to __call__ as well:

# FILE: foo.py - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

class Foo_class:
    def __init__(self):
        self.counter = 0
    def __call__(self, x, y, z): # overload operator()
        self.counter += 1
        print("counter is %d" % self.counter);
        print("x, y, z, are %d, %d, %d" % (x, y, z));
foo = Foo_class() # call the constructor

# FILE: main.py - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

from foo import foo

for i in range(0, 5):
    foo(7, 8, 9) # function call

# Console Output - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

counter is 1
x, y, z, are 7, 8, 9
counter is 2
x, y, z, are 7, 8, 9
counter is 3
x, y, z, are 7, 8, 9
counter is 4
x, y, z, are 7, 8, 9
counter is 5
x, y, z, are 7, 8, 9
4

Soulution n +=1

def foo():
  foo.__dict__.setdefault('count', 0)
  foo.count += 1
  return foo.count
3

Prompted by this question, may I present another alternative which might be a bit nicer to use and will look the same for both methods and functions:

@static_var2('seed',0)
def funccounter(statics, add=1):
    statics.seed += add
    return statics.seed

print funccounter()       #1
print funccounter(add=2)  #3
print funccounter()       #4

class ACircle(object):
    @static_var2('seed',0)
    def counter(statics, self, add=1):
        statics.seed += add
        return statics.seed

c = ACircle()
print c.counter()      #1
print c.counter(add=2) #3
print c.counter()      #4
d = ACircle()
print d.counter()      #5
print d.counter(add=2) #7
print d.counter()      #8    

If you like the usage, here's the implementation:

class StaticMan(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__dict__['_d'] = {}

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self.__dict__['_d'][name]
    def __getitem__(self, name):
        return self.__dict__['_d'][name]
    def __setattr__(self, name, val):
        self.__dict__['_d'][name] = val
    def __setitem__(self, name, val):
        self.__dict__['_d'][name] = val

def static_var2(name, val):
    def decorator(original):
        if not hasattr(original, ':staticman'):    
            def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
                return original(getattr(wrapped, ':staticman'), *args, **kwargs)
            setattr(wrapped, ':staticman', StaticMan())
            f = wrapped
        else:
            f = original #already wrapped

        getattr(f, ':staticman')[name] = val
        return f
    return decorator
2

This answer builds on @claudiu 's answer.

I found that my code was getting less clear when I always had to prepend the function name, whenever I intend to access a static variable.

Namely, in my function code I would prefer to write:

print(statics.foo)

instead of

print(my_function_name.foo)

So, my solution is to :

  1. add a statics attribute to the function
  2. in the function scope, add a local variable statics as an alias to my_function.statics
from bunch import *

def static_vars(**kwargs):
    def decorate(func):
        statics = Bunch(**kwargs)
        setattr(func, "statics", statics)
        return func
    return decorate

@static_vars(name = "Martin")
def my_function():
    statics = my_function.statics
    print("Hello, {0}".format(statics.name))

Remark

My method uses a class named Bunch, which is a dictionary that supports attribute-style access, a la JavaScript (see the original article about it, around 2000)

It can be installed via pip install bunch

It can also be hand-written like so:

class Bunch(dict):
    def __init__(self, **kw):
        dict.__init__(self,kw)
        self.__dict__ = self
1
  • Note: types.SimpleNamespace (available since 3.3) supports this behavior out of the box (and is implemented in C on CPython, so it's about as fast as it can be). Commented Dec 28, 2019 at 3:12
1

I personally prefer the following to decorators. To each their own.

def staticize(name, factory):
    """Makes a pseudo-static variable in calling function.

    If name `name` exists in calling function, return it. 
    Otherwise, saves return value of `factory()` in 
    name `name` of calling function and return it.

    :param name: name to use to store static object 
    in calling function
    :type name: String
    :param factory: used to initialize name `name` 
    in calling function
    :type factory: function
    :rtype: `type(factory())`

    >>> def steveholt(z):
    ...     a = staticize('a', list)
    ...     a.append(z)
    >>> steveholt.a
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
    AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'a'
    >>> steveholt(1)
    >>> steveholt.a
    [1]
    >>> steveholt('a')
    >>> steveholt.a
    [1, 'a']
    >>> steveholt.a = []
    >>> steveholt.a
    []
    >>> steveholt('zzz')
    >>> steveholt.a
    ['zzz']

    """
    from inspect import stack
    # get scope enclosing calling function
    calling_fn_scope = stack()[2][0]
    # get calling function
    calling_fn_name = stack()[1][3]
    calling_fn = calling_fn_scope.f_locals[calling_fn_name]
    if not hasattr(calling_fn, name):
        setattr(calling_fn, name, factory())
    return getattr(calling_fn, name)
2
  • 3
    Please don't be offended, but this solution reminds me a bit of the "large company style" :-) willa.me/2013/11/the-six-most-common-species-of-code.html
    – JJC
    Commented Nov 19, 2013 at 15:50
  • Yes, using non-portable (stack manipulation in general is a CPython implementation detail, not something you can rely on in PyPy, Jython, IronPython, what-have-you), fragile stack manipulation, with half a dozen function calls on every use is way better than a simple decorator...</s> Commented Dec 28, 2019 at 3:05
1

UPDATED: Just throwing my new implementation into the fray.

import functools

def staticinator(**kwargs):
    """ Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz Approved Staticinator
    
    Ah, Perry the Plateaus, you're just in time to witness my latest invention, the Staticinator!  
    It's a device that makes things static!  Behold!

    Allow me to explain my evil plan.

    I will use the Staticinator to make all of my functions static.  This will allow me to use
    static variables in my functions.  Mwahahahaha!

    ### Examples:
    ```python
    >>> @staticinator(count=0)
    ... def _example_countinator(static: dict):
    ...     static["count"] += 1
    ...     return static["count"]
    >>> _example_countinator()
    1
    >>> _example_countinator()
    2

    """
    def decoratinator(func):
        partial_func = functools.partial(func, kwargs)
        functools.update_wrapper(partial_func, func)
        return partial_func
    return decoratinator

This simple decorator allows you to initialize any number of variables as a static variable that will retain its value for subsequent executions.

Example 1

Here is a simple "counter" example

@staticinator(count=0)
def _example_count(static: dict):
    """A simple counter function that uses a static variable

    ### Examples:
    ```python
    >>> _example_count()
    1
    >>> _example_count()
    2
    >>> _example_count()
    3
    
    ```
    """
    static["count"] += 1
    return static["count"]

Example 2

How about something a bit more complex? Let's have an initial value set by the calling function that is subsequently cut in half.

@staticinator(value=None)
def _example_cut_it_in_half(static: dict, start_value: float = None) -> float:
    """Cut a value in half
    
    ### MEME
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ2LkrpmlaA

    ### Examples:
    ```python
    >>> _example_cut_it_in_half(1000)
    500.0
    >>> _example_cut_it_in_half()
    250.0
    >>> _example_cut_it_in_half()
    125.0

    ```
    """

    if static["value"] is None:
        static["value"] = start_value
    static["value"] /= 2
    return static["value"]

How it works

Just add the @staticinator decorator to any function you want to add static variables to. Any variables defined are then passed as a dictionary as the first parameter of the decorated function. You can name this variable whatever you want but static works as a means to keep things easy to understand.

We need to keep the values in the dictionary to ensure the reference remains intact. If we were to assign a value primitive to a variable, the magic would die and the variable would be a regular variable again.

You can even add keys to the static dictionary and they would also be retained for subsequent calls.

0
1

Other posted answers are not compliant with mypy type checking. Using the vars() function to access the functions attributes dict results in compact code which mypy and other typecheckers will accept:

def get_static():
    attrs = vars(get_static)
    if attrs.setdefault("my_var", None) is None:
        print("init")
        attrs["my_var"] = 0
    attrs["my_var"] += 1
    return attrs["my_var"]
>>> get_static()
init
1
>>> get_static()
2
>>> get_static()
3
0

Building on Daniel's answer (additions):

class Foo(object): 
    counter = 0  

def __call__(self, inc_value=0):
    Foo.counter += inc_value
    return Foo.counter

foo = Foo()

def use_foo(x,y):
    if(x==5):
        foo(2)
    elif(y==7):
        foo(3)
    if(foo() == 10):
        print("yello")


use_foo(5,1)
use_foo(5,1)
use_foo(1,7)
use_foo(1,7)
use_foo(1,1)

The reason why I wanted to add this part is , static variables are used not only for incrementing by some value, but also check if the static var is equal to some value, as a real life example.

The static variable is still protected and used only within the scope of the function use_foo()

In this example, call to foo() functions exactly as(with respect to the corresponding c++ equivalent) :

stat_c +=9; // in c++
foo(9)  #python equiv

if(stat_c==10){ //do something}  // c++

if(foo() == 10):      # python equiv
  #add code here      # python equiv       

Output :
yello
yello

if class Foo is defined restrictively as a singleton class, that would be ideal. This would make it more pythonic.

0

I write a simple function to use static variables:

def Static():
    ### get the func object by which Static() is called.
    from inspect import currentframe, getframeinfo
    caller = currentframe().f_back
    func_name = getframeinfo(caller)[2]
    # print(func_name)
    caller = caller.f_back
    func = caller.f_locals.get(
        func_name, caller.f_globals.get(
            func_name
        )
    )
    
    class StaticVars:
        def has(self, varName):
            return hasattr(self, varName)
        def declare(self, varName, value):
            if not self.has(varName):
                setattr(self, varName, value)

    if hasattr(func, "staticVars"):
        return func.staticVars
    else:
        # add an attribute to func
        func.staticVars = StaticVars()
        return func.staticVars

How to use:

def myfunc(arg):
    if Static().has('test1'):
        Static().test += 1
    else:
        Static().test = 1
    print(Static().test)

    # declare() only takes effect in the first time for each static variable.
    Static().declare('test2', 1)
    print(Static().test2)
    Static().test2 += 1
0

Miguel Angelo's self-redefinition solution is even possible without any decorator:

def fun(increment=1):
    global fun
    counter = 0
    def fun(increment=1):
        nonlocal counter
        counter += increment
        print(counter)
    fun(increment)

fun()    #=> 1
fun()    #=> 2
fun(10)  #=> 12

The second line has to be adapted to get a limited scope:

def outerfun():
    def innerfun(increment=1):
        nonlocal innerfun
        counter = 0
        def innerfun(increment=1):
            nonlocal counter
            counter += increment
            print(counter)
        innerfun(increment)

    innerfun()    #=> 1
    innerfun()    #=> 2
    innerfun(10)  #=> 12

outerfun()

The plus of the decorator is that you don't have to pay extra attention to the scope of your construction.

0

I don't know how future-proof this solution is, so maybe it's only a curiosity. It exploits a python-gotcha that default parameters are only evaluated once.

def foo(counter=[0]):
    counter[0] += 1
    print(f"{counter[0] = }")

foo()
foo()

output is

counter[0] = 1
counter[0] = 2

obvious variants are

def foo(thing,counter={}):
    if thing not in counter:
        counter[thing] = 0
    counter[thing] += 1
    print(f"count of {thing} = {counter[thing]}")
    return counter

foo('cat')
foo('cat')
foo('bird')

output is

count of cat = 1
count of cat = 2
count of bird = 1

def fib(answer=[]):
    if len(answer)<2: # empty lists are not True
        answer.append(1)
    else:
        answer.append(answer[-2]+answer[-1])
    return answer[-1]

print(f"{[fib() for i in range(10)]}")

output is

[1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55]    
0

Variant of the class method, makes the calling signature easier. using init means you don't need to use the () you need for _call, or create an instance of the class.

class do_work:
    cnt=0

    @staticmethod
    def __init__(arg):
        do_work.cnt += 1
        print(arg, do_work.cnt)

do_work('a')
do_work('b')
do_work('e')

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