113

I've got quite big trouble, because i need to anathematise from styling some input types. I had something like:

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio")
{
 //Nah.
}

But i don't want to style checkboxes too.

I've tried:

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio" && type="checkbox"])
.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio" && "checkbox"])
.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio") && .registration_form_right input:not(type="checkbox"])

How to use &&? And I'll need to use || soon, and I think that usage will be same.

Update:
I still don't know how to use || and && correctly. I couldn't find anything in W3 docs.

  • 17
    "anathematise" Yikes. You want to threaten people attempting to style checkboxes with devine retribution? (You probably meant "exempt" or similar, e.g., "I need to exempt some input types from a styling rule.") – T.J. Crowder May 9 '10 at 9:01
  • 3
    Well, i couldn't find good translation to phrasal verb from my language ;) – Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:06
  • 4
    I think @T.J. Crowder probably understood that. But it was funny...particularly the irony of his misspelling 'divine' =D – David says reinstate Monica May 9 '10 at 10:32
  • Great ngram, though. ;^) – ruffin Jan 11 '16 at 19:52
141
1

&& works by stringing-together multiple selectors like-so:

<div class="class1 class2"></div>

div.class1.class2
{
  /* foo */
}

Another example:

<input type="radio" class="class1" />

input[type="radio"].class1
{
  /* foo */
}

|| works by separating multiple selectors with commas like-so:

<div class="class1"></div>
<div class="class2"></div>

div.class1,
div.class2
{
  /* foo */
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Ok, thanks for light. I hate styling forms, but it's my task, and site isn't mine. I'll apply classes to inputs. – Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:02
  • 5
    Here's a useful chart of what Internet Explorer supports: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc351024(VS.85).aspx#selectors – geofflee May 9 '10 at 9:09
  • 12
    Who uses IE now :) – Tarun Jan 5 '13 at 14:11
  • 2
    not seems to work from IE9 onwards (thanks to the chart supplied by @geofflee). – SharpC Jun 12 '17 at 7:43
  • 1
    Are we really still concerned with supporting older versions of IE in 2018? Not even Microsoft does. – Anomaly Mar 15 '18 at 12:18
48
0

AND (&&):

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]):not([type="checkbox"])

OR (||):

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]), 
   .registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"])
| improve this answer | |
  • Nah, fail too. It'll apply 1 to 2 and 2 to 1 – Misiur May 9 '10 at 8:56
  • @KennyTM: Look. Using comma will do something like this: .registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]) will apply to everything including checkbox, and .registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"]) will apply to everything, including radio – Misiur May 9 '10 at 9:07
  • @Misiur: Of course. The 2nd is for the "OR" (a.k.a. ||) case. Updated to clarify. – kennytm May 9 '10 at 9:24
  • 1
    @KennyTM: What Misiur is trying to say is… Your "||" example is syntactically correct, but if you simplify the expression, it becomes just ".registration_form_right input" because the union of the two selectors includes all inputs. – geofflee May 9 '10 at 9:41
  • @geo, @Mis: look, the question asked "I'll need to use || soon", so this is a way to construct a || out of the examples. Of course it becomes .registration_form_right input after simplification, but the essence is you use the , as ||. You could use input:not([type="radio"]), input:not([name="foo"]) for a nontrivial example. – kennytm May 9 '10 at 12:07
16
1

To select properties a AND b of a X element:

X[a][b]

To select properties a OR b of a X element:

X[a],X[b]
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4
0

The :not pseudo-class is not supported by IE. I'd got for something like this instead:

.registration_form_right input[type="text"],
.registration_form_right input[type="password"],
.registration_form_right input[type="submit"],
.registration_form_right input[type="button"] {
  ...
}

Some duplication there, but it's a small price to pay for higher compatibility.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

You can somehow reproduce the behavior of "OR" using & and :not.

SomeElement.SomeClass [data-statement="things are getting more complex"]  :not(:not(A):not(B))     {
    /* things aren't so complex for A or B */
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Sorry, :not(:not) is not a valid CSS syntax. It works with jQuery though. – Serge Profafilecebook Oct 27 '14 at 12:56
1
0

I guess you hate to write more selectors and divide them by a comma?

.registration_form_right input:not([type="radio"]),  
.registration_form_right input:not([type="checkbox"])  
{  
}

and BTW this

not([type="radio" && type="checkbox"])  

looks to me more like "input which does not have both these types" :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    That wouldn't work, because the first selector would select all non- radio, (but would select the checkbox), and the second would do the reverse. The union of the two would contain both checkbox and radio. – Eric May 9 '10 at 8:53
  • That first example won't && them together, it'll fire for inputs that aren't radios for the first selector, AND inputs that aren't checkboxes, which means all inputs :-) – Dan F May 9 '10 at 8:54
  • You're wrong. Then, first one will apply to second, and second, to first. – Misiur May 9 '10 at 8:55
1
0

Just in case if any one is stuck like me. After going though the post and some hit and trial this worked for me.

input:not([type="checkbox"])input:not([type="radio"])
| improve this answer | |
1
0

A word of caution. Stringing together several not selectors increases the specificity of the resulting selector, which makes it harder to override: you'll basically need to find the selector with all the nots and copy-paste it into your new selector.

A not(X or Y) selector would be great to avoid inflating specificity, but I guess we'll have to stick to combining the opposites, like in this answer.

| improve this answer | |

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