0

When I first tried to understand closures, I was met by an impenetrable wall of paper of incomprehensibly presented computer science I had to understand before I could touch a closure. Then I learned, on more of a monkey see, monkey do basis, that while JavaScript keywords did not allow Java's idiom, of (excuse my hazy memory here):

JAVA:

class ObjectWithPrivateMember()
    {
    private int counter;
    public void ObjectWithPrivateMember()
        {
        counter = 0;
        }
    public void increment()
        {
        counter += 1;
        }
    public void decrement()
        {
        counter -= 1;
        }
    public void get_count()
        {
        return counter;
        }
    }

JavaScript (ECMAScript as of some years back) had no real "private" / "protected" keyword, but a free translation of the Java idiom might be something like:

JAVASCRIPT:

var object_with_private_member = function()
    {
    var counter = 0;
    return {
        increment: function()
            {
            counter += 1;
            },
        decrement: function()
            {
            counter -= 1;
            },
        get_count: function()
            {
            return counter;
            }
        };
    }();

And besides my immediate reaction of "Ewwwww, duct tape to try to dress up JavaScript as something it's not," I had mentally filed that as, "Ok, that is how to shoehorn the Java idiom with obscure details of JavaScript. This probably affords little direct insight into what is great about JavaScript."

Now that I came back to address the question "What are closures really good for?", the Wikipedia entry gives a few details and suggests that information hiding may be a primary use case, not just in multi-paradigm languages with a heavy functional bent, but the usual suspects for first-class functional languages. Of course it is more detailed and offers more nuance, but it suggests that the textbook "JavaScript object with private fields" use case is not nearly as tangential as I assumed it was.

What is (are) the real use case(s) a good functional programmer would see for closures in pure functional languages or multi-paradigm languages with a functional bent? Are they primarily used for information hiding (the Wikipedia article offers more nuance and detail than the caricature above, but at least at first blush my thought was that closures probably had a bigger and more interesting role in JavaScript than a backdoor way to create private members.

Are there other major use cases besides a mechanism for information hiding in pure / multi-paradigm functional languages?

  • 4
    This question would be a better fit for Programmers Stack Exchange. – Jordan Running Jan 15 '15 at 22:53
  • Objects are just a poor man's closures. – Pointy Jan 15 '15 at 22:57
  • Why is your question tagged Java and JavaScript? In Java 8+, lambdas are examples of closures and they allow you to reduce boiler-plate code by providing syntatical sugar that expands to equivalent local classes. Finally, an IIFE isn't the only use of closures in JavaScript. – Elliott Frisch Jan 15 '15 at 22:59
  • Emulating private members is a use of closures, they are handy whenever access to a previous or outer execution context is desirable, and an annoying side–effect when it isn't. – RobG Jan 15 '15 at 23:07
1

The privacy thing is a minor consideration, in my experience, especially with immutable values. Why do you care who sees it, if they can't change it?

To understand the value of closures, you first must understand the value of first-class functions, then it's fairly easy to see when it might be handy to associate some data with that function.

Consider trying to write the following example from the wikipedia page without using closures, but still using the filter higher-order function:

// Return a list of all books with at least 'threshold' copies sold.
function bestSellingBooks(threshold) {
  return bookList.filter(
      function (book) { return book.sales >= threshold; }
    );
}

You need to find some other way of communicating the threshold to the predicate function. In OOP, you would create some sort of object like:

class ThresholdFilter implements Filterable {
  private threshold;
  ThresholdFilter(threshold) {
    this.threshold = threshold;
  }

  bool filter(book) {
    return book.sales >= this.threshold;
  }
}

function bestSellingBooks(threshold) {
  return bookList.filter(new ThresholdFilter(threshold));
}

Alternately, you could change the filter function to accept some sort of private generic data structure to store and pass on, which makes both filter and the predicate function more complicated and more coupled. Closures are starting to look pretty good right about now, am I right?

There are many more cases where closures vastly reduce coupling and simplify code that uses higher-order functions. It's a major reason why functional programs are so much more concise.

  • "Why do you care who sees it, if they can't change it?" One of the stated advantages of information hiding in reference to restricted variables in OOP is that software not granted access can't couple itself to an existing implementation; anything that no one else can interact with can be arbitrarily changed at will. This is a major selling point of information hiding. – Christos Hayward Jan 16 '15 at 15:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.