I have a function that I am trying to convert to the new arrow syntax in ES6. It is a named function:

function sayHello(name) {
    console.log(name + ' says hello');
}

Is there a way to give it a name without a var statement:

var sayHello = (name) => {
    console.log(name + ' says hello');
}

Obviously, I can only use this function after I have defined it. Something like following:

sayHello = (name) => {
        console.log(name + ' says hello');
    }

Is there a new way to do this in ES6?

  • 3
    Isn't the point of arrow syntax to not give the function a name? – AstroCB Jan 16 '15 at 5:02
  • 37
    Not necessarily, arrow functions maintain lexical scope so having a shorthand to produce named functions (useful for a stack trace) with lexical scope would be pretty useful – Matt Styles Mar 6 '15 at 17:13
  • 6
    What is wrong with the second snippet? – Bergi Jul 8 '15 at 22:22
  • You most certainly can reference an assigned name inside the body of the function: var sayHello = (name) => { console.log(sayHello); }; And in the case of recursive functions, you'll often do exactly that. Not a super useful example, but here's a function that returns itself if it doesn't get its argument: var sayHello = (name) => name?console.log(name+ ' says hello'):sayHello; sayHello()('frank'); //-> "frank says hello" – Dtipson Jan 14 '16 at 22:13
  • 3
    The title of the question is hugely misleading compared to its content, because you've ruled out the way you name arrow functions (which is the second snippet). – T.J. Crowder May 27 '16 at 16:06
up vote 144 down vote accepted

How do I write a named arrow function in ES2015?

You do it the way you ruled out in your question: You put it on the right-hand side of an assignment or property initializer where the variable or property name can reasonably be used as a name by the JavaScript engine. There's no other way to do it, but doing that is correct and fully covered by the specification.

Per spec, this function has a true name, sayHello:

var sayHello = name => {
    console.log(name + ' says hello');
};

This is defined in Assignment Operators > Runtime Semantics: Evaluation where it calls the abstract SetFunctionName operation (that call is currently in step 1.e.iii).

Similiarly, Runtime Semantics: PropertyDefinitionEvaluation calls SetFunctionName and thus gives this function a true name:

let o = {
    sayHello: name => {
        console.log(`${name} says hello`);
    }
};

Modern engines set the internal name of the function for statements like that already; Edge still has the bit making it available as name on the function instance behind a runtime flag.

For example, in Chrome or Firefox, open the web console and then run this snippet:

"use strict";
let foo = () => { throw new Error(); };
console.log("foo.name is: " + foo.name);
try {
  foo();
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e.stack);
}

On Chrome 51 and above and Firefox 53 and above (and Edge 13 and above with an experimental flag), when you run that, you'll see:

foo.name is: foo
Error
    at foo (http://stacksnippets.net/js:14:23)
    at http://stacksnippets.net/js:17:3

Note the foo.name is: foo and Error...at foo.

On Chrome 50 and earlier, Firefox 52 and earlier, and Edge without the experimental flag, you'll see this instead because they don't have the Function#name property (yet):

foo.name is: 
Error
    at foo (http://stacksnippets.net/js:14:23)
    at http://stacksnippets.net/js:17:3

Note that the name is missing from foo.name is:, but it is shown in the stack trace. It's just that actually implementing the name property on the function was lower priority than some other ES2015 features; Chrome and Firefox have it now; Edge has it behind a flag, presumably it won't be behind the flag a lot longer.

Obviously, I can only use this function after I have defined it

Correct. There is no function declaration syntax for arrow functions, only function expression syntax, and there's no arrow equivalent to the name in an old-style named function expression (var f = function foo() { };). So there's no equivalent to:

console.log(function fact(n) {
    if (n < 0) {
        throw new Error("Not defined for negative numbers");
    }
    return n == 0 ? 1 : n * fact(n - 1);
}(5)); // 120

You have to break it into two expressions (I'd argue you should do that anyway):

let fact = n => {
    if (n < 0) {
      throw new Error("Not defined for negative numbers.");
    }
    return n == 0 ? 1 : n * fact(n - 1);
};
console.log(fact(5));

Of course, if you have to put this where a single expression is required, you can always...use an arrow function:

console.log((() => {
    let fact = n => {
        if (n < 0) {
            throw new Error("Not defined for negative numbers.");
        }
        return n == 0 ? 1 : n * fact(n - 1);
    };
    return fact(5);
})()); // 120

I ain't sayin' that's pretty, but it works if you absolutely, positively need a single expression wrapper.

  • How do I prevent the name from being set (like in older engines)? – trusktr Mar 30 at 4:19
  • @trusktr: I can't see why you'd want to, but if you want to prevent it: Don't do the thing(s) above. For instance, while let f = () => { /* do something */ }; assigns a name to the function, let g = (() => () => { /* do something */ })(); doesn't. – T.J. Crowder Mar 30 at 6:03
  • That's what I ended up doing. I'd rather have anonymous classes generated by my class inheritance library to be anonymous than have names of internal variables that the user of my class inheritance library doesn't need to think about, and I'd like the end user to see a name only if they provided a name for the class. (github.com/trusktr/lowclass) – trusktr Mar 31 at 0:29
  • 2
    @trusktr: The one exception they made may suit your purposes, then: If you assign a function to a property on an existing object, the name is not set: o.foo = () => {}; does not give the function a name. This was intentional to prevent information leakage. – T.J. Crowder Mar 31 at 9:34

No. The arrow syntax is a shortform for anonymous functions. Anonymous functions are, well, anonymous.

Named functions are defined with the function keyword.

  • 14
    As was stated by @DenysSéguret, isn't a shortform for anonymous functions. You'll get a hard binded function. You can see the transpiled result here bit.do/es2015-arrow to understand better what this implies... – sminutoli Mar 18 '16 at 20:06
  • 12
    The first word of this answer is correct for the question asked because the OP ruled out the way you name an arrow function. But the remainder of the answer is simply incorrect. Look in the specification for where the abstract SetFunctionName operation is used. let a = () => {}; defines a named function (the name is a) both according to the spec and in modern engines (throw an error in it to see); they just don't support the name property yet (but it's in the spec and they'll get there eventually). – T.J. Crowder May 27 '16 at 16:03
  • 4
    @DenysSéguret: You can simply name them, it's in the spec. You do it the way the OP ruled out in the question, which gives the function (not just the variable) a true name. – T.J. Crowder Aug 12 '16 at 13:59
  • 4
    @T.J.Crowder Thanks for that bit of information, and for your useful answer. I didn't knew this (very very weird) feature. – Denys Séguret Aug 12 '16 at 16:03
  • 4
    This answer is not correct. The question was answered correctly by @T.J.Crowder below – Drenai Jan 9 '17 at 9:56

If by 'named', you mean you want the .name property of your arrow function to be set, you're in luck.

If an arrow function is defined on the right-hand-side of an assignment expression, the engine will take the name on the left-hand-side and use it to set the arrow function's .name, e.g.

var sayHello = (name) => {
    console.log(name + ' says hello');
}

sayHello.name //=== 'sayHello'

Having said that, your question seems to be more 'can I get an arrow function to hoist?'. The answer to that one is a big ol' "no", I'm afraid.

  • 1
    In the current version of chrome, at least, sayHello.name is still ""; Note that like all functions, sayHello is an object, so you can define arbitrary properties to it if you want. You can't write to "name" as it is read-only, but you could sayHello.my_name="sayHello"; Not sure what that gets you though, since you can't do/reference that within the body of the function. – Dtipson Jan 14 '16 at 22:07
  • 2
    I was wrong: while name isn't directly mutable, you can configure it like this: Object.defineProperty(sayHello,'name',{value:'sayHello'}) – Dtipson Jan 15 '16 at 16:07
  • 1
    "If an arrow function is defined on the right-hand-side [..]" what is the source for this? I cannot find it in the spec. Just need a reference to quote. – Gajus Feb 4 '16 at 12:29
  • @Dtipson: That's just because modern engines haven't yet implemented setting the name property everywhere the ES2015 spec requires them to; they'll get to it. It's one of the last things on the compliance list for Chrome and even Chrome 50 doesn't have it (Chrome 51 finally will). Details. But the OP specifically ruled out doing this (bizarrely). – T.J. Crowder May 27 '16 at 16:52
  • @Gajus: I cover that in my answer. – T.J. Crowder Aug 12 '16 at 13:59

It appears that this will be possible with ES7: https://babeljs.io/blog/2015/06/07/react-on-es6-plus#arrow-functions

The example given is:

class PostInfo extends React.Component {
  handleOptionsButtonClick = (e) => {
    this.setState({showOptionsModal: true});
  }
}

The body of ES6 arrow functions share the same lexical this as the code that surrounds them, which gets us the desired result because of the way that ES7 property initializers are scoped.

Note that to get this working with babel I needed to enable the most experimental ES7 stage 0 syntax. In my webpack.config.js file I updated the babel loader like so:

{test: /\.js$/, exclude: /node_modules/, loader: 'babel?stage=0'},
  • 5
    That's not exactly a named arrow function. This is a shortcut for creating instance methods in the constructor, and I wonder how it is relevant here? – Bergi Jul 9 '15 at 3:19
  • Hi @Bergi, I'm not sure if this was the intention of the original author, but I was trying to create a named function with the same this scope as the object. If we don't use this technique, and we want to have the appropriate scope we have to bing it in in the class constructor. this.handleOptionsButtonClick = this.handleOptionsButtonClick.bind(this); – Hamish Currie Jul 10 '15 at 4:38
  • 8
    Uh, you can just as easily use constructor() { this.handleOptionsButtonClick = (e) => {…}; } which is totally equivalent to the code in your answer but already works in ES6. No need to use .bind. – Bergi Jul 10 '15 at 4:43
  • 1
    Btw, I think you are confusing "named function" with "(instance) method" and "scope" with "this context" – Bergi Jul 10 '15 at 4:44
  • Oh, cool. Thanks. i may swap to doing it that way. – Hamish Currie Jul 10 '15 at 5:00

You could skip the function part and the arrow part to create functions. Example:

 class YourClassNameHere{

   constructor(age) {
     this.age = age;
   }

   foo() {
     return "This is a function with name Foo";
   }

   bar() {
     return "This is a function with name bar";
   }

 }

let myVar = new YourClassNameHere(50);
myVar.foo();

in order to write named arrow function you can fellow the bellow example, where I have a class named LoginClass and inside this class I wrote an arrow named function, named successAuth class LoginClass {

    constructor() {

    }

    successAuth = (dataArgs)=> { //named arow function

    }

}
  • 1
    It's always better to add an explanation to the code you're posting as an answer, so that it will helps visitors understand why this is a good answer. – abarisone Jul 12 '16 at 11:46
  • @abarisone done :) – BERGUIGA Mohamed Amine Jul 12 '16 at 12:25
  • This does what the OP said he doesn't want to do, and relies on this proposal which is only at Stage 2 and probably isn't even going to make ES2017 (but I think it's likely to make ES2018, and transpilers have supported it for months). It also effectively duplicates several previous answers, which isn't useful. – T.J. Crowder Feb 1 '17 at 9:43

THIS IS ES6

Yeah I think what you're after is something like this:

const foo = (depth) => {console.log("hi i'm Adele")}
foo -> // the function itself
foo() -> // "hi i'm Adele"
  • I tried this example, it works fine. Any good reason for giving negative votes? Does this usage creating any unwanted side effects or am i missing any important point? Your help in clarifying my doubt will be appreciated. – FullMoon Dec 23 '16 at 6:41
  • @GaneshAdapa: I expect the downvotes are because this is suggesting doing exactly what the OP said he/she didn't want to do, without giving any further information. – T.J. Crowder Mar 14 '17 at 10:23

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