213

I'm creating an SQL setup script and I'm using someone else's script as an example. Here's an example of the script:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[be_Categories](
    [CategoryID] [uniqueidentifier] ROWGUIDCOL  NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [DF_be_Categories_CategoryID]  DEFAULT (newid()),
    [CategoryName] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
    [Description] [nvarchar](200) NULL,
    [ParentID] [uniqueidentifier] NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_be_Categories] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [CategoryID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

Does anyone know what the ON [PRIMARY] command does?

224

When you create a database in Microsoft SQL Server you can have multiple file groups, where storage is created in multiple places, directories or disks. Each file group can be named. The PRIMARY file group is the default one, which is always created, and so the SQL you've given creates your table ON the PRIMARY file group.

See MSDN for the full syntax.

  • 136
    This also means it's usually useless and can be safely removed from the script. – MGOwen Mar 3 '11 at 0:38
  • Yes, in the same way you can just omit variable initializations to 0 and false, because it's just the default, right? – Mark Sowul Dec 4 '13 at 15:36
  • 11
    @MarkSowul Unless you have a good reason to use this to optimize performance, yes, it's fine to omit it and let the default happen. (Hence the "usually" MGOwen included.) Initializing variables to 0 or false is about ensuring that your code is operating in a known state, which is a logical and correctness concern and not an optimization concern. – jpmc26 Feb 25 '15 at 0:08
  • 3
    I see the ON PRIMARY syntax twice in the script - One for the table and another for the table constraint. What does it signify in case of the table constraint in terms of storage? It sounds irrelevant or redundant to me. Syntactically, it should have been sufficient to mention it once at the table level or is it really possible to store the table on PRIMARY file group and table constraint data on NON-PRIMARY file group? – RBT Aug 11 '16 at 23:58
  • 1
    Here is the actual MSDN link. The one in the answer no longer works and I cannot edit the post ! – shekhar Apr 11 '17 at 18:28
37

It refers to which filegroup the object you are creating resides on. So your Primary filegroup could reside on drive D:\ of your server. you could then create another filegroup called Indexes. This filegroup could reside on drive E:\ of your server.

  • Will it have a negative performance impact if I store the table on PRIMARY file group and table constraint or index data structure on a different file group? – RBT Aug 12 '16 at 0:12
  • @RBT There are lots of variables that can affect this, and usually lots of answers will begin with "It depends but..." see dba.stackexchange.com/questions/2626/… and related questions – codingbadger Aug 12 '16 at 7:39
15

ON [PRIMARY] will create the structures on the "Primary" filegroup. In this case the primary key index and the table will be placed on the "Primary" filegroup within the database.

6

To add a very important note on what Mark S. has mentioned in his post. In the specific SQL Script that has been mentioned in the question you can NEVER mention two different file groups for storing your data rows and the index data structure.

The reason why is due to the fact that the index being created in this case is a clustered Index on your primary key column. The clustered index data and the data rows of your table can NEVER be on different file groups.

So in case you have two file groups on your database e.g. PRIMARY and SECONDARY then below mentioned script will store your row data and clustered index data both on PRIMARY file group itself even though I've mentioned a different file group ([SECONDARY]) for the table data. More interestingly the script runs successfully as well (when I was expecting it to give an error as I had given two different file groups :P). SQL Server does the trick behind the scene silently and smartly.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[be_Categories](
    [CategoryID] [uniqueidentifier] ROWGUIDCOL  NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [DF_be_Categories_CategoryID]  DEFAULT (newid()),
    [CategoryName] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
    [Description] [nvarchar](200) NULL,
    [ParentID] [uniqueidentifier] NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_be_Categories] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [CategoryID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [SECONDARY]
GO

NOTE: Your index can reside on a different file group ONLY if the index being created is non-clustered in nature.

The below script which creates a non-clustered index will get created on [SECONDARY] file group instead when the table data already resides on [PRIMARY] file group:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_Categories] ON [dbo].[be_Categories]
(
    [CategoryName] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [Secondary]
GO

You can get more information on how storing non-clustered indexes on a different file group can help your queries perform better. Here is one such link.

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