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I am trying to cluster 1000 dimension, 250k vectors using k-means. The machine that I am working on has 80 dual-cores.

Just confirming, if anyone has compared the run-time of k-means default batch parallel version against k-means mini-batch version? The example comparison page on sklean documents doesn't provide much info as the dataset is quite small.

Much appreciate your help.

Regards,

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  • I am working with both of them for different parameters to see which performs better. But I still posted the question here to cross-check if someone has already done this before. I will share my results too.
    – PS1
    Jan 16, 2015 at 18:07
  • What was your conclusion?
    – Kenney
    Jun 6, 2022 at 23:56

1 Answer 1

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Conventional wisdom holds that Mini-Batch K-Means should be faster and more efficient for greater than 10,000 samples. Since you have 250,000 samples, you should probably use mini-batch if you don't want to test it out on your own.

Note that the example you referenced can very easily be changed to a 5000, 10,000 or 20,000 point example by changing n_samples in this line:

X, labels_true = make_blobs(n_samples=3000, centers=centers, cluster_std=0.7)

I agree that this won't necessarily scale the same for 1000 dimensional vectors, but since you are constructing the example and are using either k-means or mini batch k-means and it only takes a second to switch between them... You should just do a scaling study for your 1000 dimensional vectors for 5k, 10k, 15k, 20k samples.

Theoretically, there is no reason why Mini-Batch K-Means should underperform K-Means due to vector dimensionality and we know that it does better for larger sample sizes, so I would go with mini batch off the cuff e.g. bias for action over research.

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    Thanks AN6U5 for you response. What I am looking for is the comparison between "parallel" version of k-means batch (by employing n_jobs arg) against mini-batch.
    – PS1
    Jan 16, 2015 at 18:05
  • I am working with both of them for different parameters to see which performs better. But I still posted the question here to cross-check if someone has already done this before. I will share my results too.
    – PS1
    Jan 16, 2015 at 18:06
  • Thanks for the clarification, I was not aware that mini batch didn't have a multithreaded implementation. Yeah, it would be surprising if an 80 core shared memory machine couldn't outperform a single core instance of mini-batch. I'd be interested to see your strong scaling study results.
    – AN6U5
    Jan 16, 2015 at 21:47

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