8

I have a list of indexes, e.g. 0...365 and I want to select few, randomly selected without replacement, contiguous sub-regions of this list.

index = [i+1 for i in range(365) ] 
#n could be 3
for i in range(n):
   exclusion_regions.append( get_random_contiguous_region(index) )

Does anyone have suggestions for the implementation of get_random_contiguous_region()

6
  • 1
    How big should the sub-regions be?
    – Ffisegydd
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:33
  • I want to keep this flexible but to make this simpler total length of the regions should be between 5 and 15% of the array, and each region should be 30% of that. So, each region should be about 10 items.
    – Edmon
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:35
  • what is n in your code? Jan 16, 2015 at 16:37
  • For this example say 3.
    – Edmon
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:38
  • so three random slices from the array? Jan 16, 2015 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

2

You can do:

import random

n = 3
index = [i+1 for i in range(10) ] 
slices = sorted(random.sample(range(0, len(index)), 2*n))
[index[start:end] for start, end in zip(slices[::2], slices[1::2])]
4
  • that is why I used set, the element are unique so no overlapping segments.
    – elyase
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:55
  • You can end up with a single slice Jan 16, 2015 at 16:59
  • You are right, I noticed that bug after you mentioned, should be corrected now.
    – elyase
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:59
  • you can end up with vastly different sized slices which I don't think is the requirement, you cannot do this with a list comp Jan 16, 2015 at 17:02
2

This is a quiet simple recursive approach: The list of indexes is randomly divided into contiguous sequences within the given size-range. After that, three of those subsequences are chosen.

indexes = range(1, 80)
from random import randint, sample 

# recursive division of the sequence
def get_random_division(lst, minsize, maxsize):
    split_index = randint(minsize, maxsize)
    # if the remaining list would get too small, return the unsplit one
    if minsize>len(lst)-split_index:
        return [lst]
    return [lst[:split_index]] + get_random_division(lst[split_index:], minsize, maxsize)

# determine size range of the subdivisions
minsize, maxsize = 5, int(0.15*len(data))
# choose three of the subdivided sequences
sample(get_random_division(indexes, minsize, maxsize), 3)

Out:

[[17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26],
 [36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46],
 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]]
1

We need a while loop to make sure we don't end up overlapping and you can check that the length of slice meets any other criteria, using a list comp you cannot specify different criteria: If you want random slices from roughly 5 to 15 percent of the total list size and a sample size around 30 percent:

from random import choice
from numpy import arange

index = [i + 1 for i in range(365)]
choices = []
seen = set()
ar = arange(0.05,.16, .01)
ln = len(index)
sample_size = 0
while sample_size < ln * .30:
    perc = choice(ar)  # get random 5, 10, 15 percent slices
    size = int(ln * perc)
    ch = choice(index[:-size+1]) # avoid falling off the side
    rn = index[ch:ch+size]
    if len(rn) == size and not seen.intersection(rn):
        seen.update(rn)
        choices.append(rn)
        sample_size += len(rn)
print(choices)
7
  • Padraic, what about index out of bounds with ch+20, will it wrap around?
    – Edmon
    Jan 16, 2015 at 16:54
  • @Edmon, when getting the start point only give a choice up to index[:-20] then you will never go off the end, you can wrap around if you want but it is more work. do you want random length slices or all the same length? Jan 16, 2015 at 16:55
  • I would ideally want a random length slices of the "safe" length (i.e. never more in total that about 20-30 percent of the array.) I did not ask for it because I thought it would be too much (and I can figure out that part). Add that if not too much bother. Btw, I cannot up-vote. It lets me only subtract the votes :-/
    – Edmon
    Jan 16, 2015 at 17:10
  • @Edmon, I added code so slices will be 25 percent of total size, obviously n has a bearing on what percentage you pick, if you wanted varying sizes pick a random number to divide by. Jan 16, 2015 at 17:19
  • No worries, there is a lot more to life than getting upvotes ;) I just find it funny when an answer that actually addresses the needs of the OP gets downvoted. Jan 16, 2015 at 17:52
1

Here is a solution that treats the ranges symbolically, rather than considering each item.

(For the small basis you are dealing with it is probably overkill, but for ranges containing tens of thousands of items it would be quite considerably more efficient.)


Edit: I have updated it to allow length to be specified either as an integer or as a 0-argument function which returns an integer. You can now have lengths given as a distribution, not just a constant.


import random

def range_intersection(a, b):
    if a.step == b.step == 1:
        return range(max(a.start, b.start), min(a.stop, b.stop), 1)
    else:
        # here be dragons!
        raise NotImplemented

def random_subrange(length, range_):
    start = random.randrange(
        range_.start,
        range_.stop - length * range_.step,
        range_.step
    )
    stop = start + length * range_.step
    return range(start, stop, range_.step)

def const_fn(n):
    def fn():
        return n
    return fn

def random_distinct_subranges(num, length, range_):
    if not callable(length):
        length = const_fn(length)
    ranges = []
    for n in range(num):
        while True:
            new_range = random_subrange(length(), range_)
            if not any(range_intersection(new_range, r) for r in ranges):
                ranges.append(new_range)
                break
    ranges.sort(key = lambda r: r.start)
    return ranges

then

days = range(1, 366)

# pick 3 periods randomly without overlapping
periods = random_distinct_subranges(3, lambda:random.randint(5,15), days)
print(periods)

which gives something like

[range(78, 92), range(147, 155), range(165, 173)]

which can be iterated over like

from itertools import chain

rand_days = chain(*periods)
print(list(rand_days))

giving

[78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172]
2
  • I am getting and error that list does not attribute start on: def random_subrange(length, range_): start = random.randrange( range_.start, range_.stop - length * range_.step, range_.step )
    – Edmon
    Jan 16, 2015 at 21:21
  • @Edmon: what version of Python are you using? This should work for any Python 3.x; I have not tried it with Python 2.x, that may be the problem. Jan 17, 2015 at 1:46

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