98
d3 = dict(d1, **d2)

I understand that this merges the dictionary. But, is it unique? What if d1 has the same key as d2 but different value? I would like d1 and d2 to be merged, but d1 has priority if there is duplicate key.

2

7 Answers 7

162

You can use the .update() method if you don't need the original d2 any more:

Update the dictionary with the key/value pairs from other, overwriting existing keys. Return None.

E.g.:

>>> d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2} 
>>> d2 = {'b': 1, 'c': 3}
>>> d2.update(d1)
>>> d2
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}

Update:

Of course you can copy the dictionary first in order to create a new merged one. This might or might not be necessary. In case you have compound objects (objects that contain other objects, like lists or class instances) in your dictionary, copy.deepcopy should also be considered.

10
  • 1
    With this case d1 elements should correctly get priority if conflicting keys are found May 9, 2010 at 20:36
  • In case you still need it, just make a copy. d3 = d2.copy() d3.update(d1) but I would like to see d1 + d2 being added to the language.
    – stach
    May 9, 2010 at 20:37
  • 4
    d1 + d2 is problematic because one dictionary has to have priority during conflicts, and it's not particularly obvious which one.
    – rjh
    May 9, 2010 at 20:39
  • d1 + d2 will only ever be implemented if Python gains a multimap, otherwise the ambiguity to the user is too confusing for the 8 byte typing gain. May 9, 2010 at 20:54
  • You have objects in the dictionary in this example: isinstance(int, object) is True yet deepcopy doesn't seem necessary. Jun 12, 2013 at 5:55
45

In Python2,

d1={'a':1,'b':2}
d2={'a':10,'c':3}

d1 overrides d2:

dict(d2,**d1)
# {'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}

d2 overrides d1:

dict(d1,**d2)
# {'a': 10, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}

This behavior is not just a fluke of implementation; it is guaranteed in the documentation:

If a key is specified both in the positional argument and as a keyword argument, the value associated with the keyword is retained in the dictionary.

6
  • 3
    Your examples will fail (producing a TypeError) in Python 3.2, and in current versions of Jython, PyPy and IronPython: for those versions of Python, when passing a dict with the ** notation, all the keys of that dict should be strings. See the python-dev thread starting at mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2010-April/099427.html for more. May 10, 2010 at 9:27
  • @Mark: Thanks for the heads up. I've edited the code to make it compatible with non-CPython implementations.
    – unutbu
    May 10, 2010 at 17:50
  • 3
    it fails if your keys are tuples of strings and numbers. for eg. d1={(1,'a'):1, (1,'b'):0,} d2={(1,'a'):1, (2,'b'):2, (2,'a'):1,} Jul 29, 2013 at 6:41
  • Regarding the unpacking syntax, see this post for changes forthcoming in python 3.5.
    – 0 _
    Apr 11, 2015 at 4:07
  • I was going to say that d = dict(**d1, **d2) works, but that's what @IoannisFilippidis references in their comment. Perhaps including the snippet here would've been clearer, so here it is.
    – dwanderson
    Feb 16, 2017 at 21:51
14

If you want d1 to have priority in the conflicts, do:

d3 = d2.copy()
d3.update(d1)

Otherwise, reverse d2 and d1.

0
5

Starting in Python 3.9, the operator | creates a new dictionary with the merged keys and values from two dictionaries:

# d1 = { 'a': 1, 'b': 2 }
# d2 = { 'b': 1, 'c': 3 }
d3 = d2 | d1
# d3: {'b': 2, 'c': 3, 'a': 1}

This:

Creates a new dictionary d3 with the merged keys and values of d2 and d1. The values of d1 take priority when d2 and d1 share keys.


Also note the |= operator which modifies d2 by merging d1 in, with priority on d1 values:

# d1 = { 'a': 1, 'b': 2 }
# d2 = { 'b': 1, 'c': 3 }
d2 |= d1
# d2: {'b': 2, 'c': 3, 'a': 1}

2

My solution is to define a merge function. It's not sophisticated and just cost one line. Here's the code in Python 3.

from functools import reduce
from operator import or_

def merge(*dicts):
    return { k: reduce(lambda d, x: x.get(k, d), dicts, None) for k in reduce(or_, map(lambda x: x.keys(), dicts), set()) }

Tests

>>> d = {0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 16}
>>> d_letters = {0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c', 3: 'd', 4: 'e', 5: 'f', 6: 'g', 7: 'h', 8: 'i', 9: 'j', 10: 'k', 11: 'l', 12: 'm', 13: 'n', 14: 'o', 15: 'p', 16: 'q', 17: 'r', 18: 's', 19: 't', 20: 'u', 21: 'v', 22: 'w', 23: 'x', 24: 'y', 25: 'z', 26: 'A', 27: 'B', 28: 'C', 29: 'D', 30: 'E', 31: 'F', 32: 'G', 33: 'H', 34: 'I', 35: 'J', 36: 'K', 37: 'L', 38: 'M', 39: 'N', 40: 'O', 41: 'P', 42: 'Q', 43: 'R', 44: 'S', 45: 'T', 46: 'U', 47: 'V', 48: 'W', 49: 'X', 50: 'Y', 51: 'Z'}
>>> merge(d, d_letters)
{0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c', 3: 'd', 4: 'e', 5: 'f', 6: 'g', 7: 'h', 8: 'i', 9: 'j', 10: 'k', 11: 'l', 12: 'm', 13: 'n', 14: 'o', 15: 'p', 16: 'q', 17: 'r', 18: 's', 19: 't', 20: 'u', 21: 'v', 22: 'w', 23: 'x', 24: 'y', 25: 'z', 26: 'A', 27: 'B', 28: 'C', 29: 'D', 30: 'E', 31: 'F', 32: 'G', 33: 'H', 34: 'I', 35: 'J', 36: 'K', 37: 'L', 38: 'M', 39: 'N', 40: 'O', 41: 'P', 42: 'Q', 43: 'R', 44: 'S', 45: 'T', 46: 'U', 47: 'V', 48: 'W', 49: 'X', 50: 'Y', 51: 'Z'}
>>> merge(d_letters, d)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 16, 5: 'f', 6: 'g', 7: 'h', 8: 'i', 9: 'j', 10: 'k', 11: 'l', 12: 'm', 13: 'n', 14: 'o', 15: 'p', 16: 'q', 17: 'r', 18: 's', 19: 't', 20: 'u', 21: 'v', 22: 'w', 23: 'x', 24: 'y', 25: 'z', 26: 'A', 27: 'B', 28: 'C', 29: 'D', 30: 'E', 31: 'F', 32: 'G', 33: 'H', 34: 'I', 35: 'J', 36: 'K', 37: 'L', 38: 'M', 39: 'N', 40: 'O', 41: 'P', 42: 'Q', 43: 'R', 44: 'S', 45: 'T', 46: 'U', 47: 'V', 48: 'W', 49: 'X', 50: 'Y', 51: 'Z'}
>>> merge(d)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 16}
>>> merge(d_letters)
{0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c', 3: 'd', 4: 'e', 5: 'f', 6: 'g', 7: 'h', 8: 'i', 9: 'j', 10: 'k', 11: 'l', 12: 'm', 13: 'n', 14: 'o', 15: 'p', 16: 'q', 17: 'r', 18: 's', 19: 't', 20: 'u', 21: 'v', 22: 'w', 23: 'x', 24: 'y', 25: 'z', 26: 'A', 27: 'B', 28: 'C', 29: 'D', 30: 'E', 31: 'F', 32: 'G', 33: 'H', 34: 'I', 35: 'J', 36: 'K', 37: 'L', 38: 'M', 39: 'N', 40: 'O', 41: 'P', 42: 'Q', 43: 'R', 44: 'S', 45: 'T', 46: 'U', 47: 'V', 48: 'W', 49: 'X', 50: 'Y', 51: 'Z'}
>>> merge()
{}

It works for arbitrary number of dictionary arguments. Were there any duplicate keys in those dictionary, the key from the rightmost dictionary in the argument list wins.

4
  • 1
    A simple loop with an .update call in it (merged={} followed by for d in dict: merged.update(d)) would be shorter, more readable and more efficient. Feb 7, 2015 at 9:03
  • 1
    Or if you really want to use reduce and lambdas, how about return reduce(lambda x, y: x.update(y) or x, dicts, {})? Feb 7, 2015 at 9:07
  • 1
    You can try out your code in the shell and see if it's correct. What I was trying to do is to write a function that can take various number of dictionary arguments with the same functionality. It's better not to use x.update(y) under the lambda, because it always returns None. And I am trying to write a more general function merge_with that take various number of dictionary argument and deal with duplicate keys with the supplied function. Once I am done, I'll post it in another thread where the solution is more relevant.
    – Lei Zhao
    Feb 7, 2015 at 9:34
  • Here's link where I wrote the more general solution. Welcome and have a look.
    – Lei Zhao
    Feb 7, 2015 at 11:54
1

Trey Hunner has a nice blog post outlining several options for merging multiple dictionaries, including (for python3.3+) ChainMap and dictionary unpacking.

1

I believe that, as stated above, using d2.update(d1) is the best approach and that you can also copy d2 first if you still need it.

Although, I want to point out that dict(d1, **d2) is actually a bad way to merge dictionnaries in general since keyword arguments need to be strings, thus it will fail if you have a dict such as:

{
  1: 'foo',
  2: 'bar'
}

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