I was watching a Pluralsight course on React and the instructor stated that props should not be changed. I'm now reading an article (uberVU/react-guide) on props vs. state and it says

Both props and state changes trigger a render update.

Later in the article it says:

Props (short for properties) are a Component's configuration, its options if you may. They are received from above and immutable.

  • So props can change but they should be immutable?
  • When should you use props and when should you use state?
  • If you have data that a React component needs, should it be passed through props or setup in the React component via getInitialState?

20 Answers 20

up vote 412 down vote accepted

Props and state are related. The state of one component will often become the props of a child component. Props are passed to the child within the render method of the parent as the second argument to React.createElement() or, if you're using JSX, the more familiar tag attributes.

<MyChild name={this.state.childsName} />

The parent's state value of childsName becomes the child's this.props.name. From the child's perspective, the name prop is immutable. If it needs to be changed, the parent should just change its internal state:

this.setState({ childsName: 'New name' });

and React will propagate it to the child for you. A natural follow-on question is: what if the child needs to change its name prop? This is usually done through child events and parent callbacks. The child might expose an event called, for example, onNameChanged. The parent would then subscribe to the event by passing a callback handler.

<MyChild name={this.state.childsName} onNameChanged={this.handleName} />

The child would pass its requested new name as an argument to the event callback by calling, e.g., this.props.onNameChanged('New name'), and the parent would use the name in the event handler to update its state.

handleName: function(newName) {
   this.setState({ childsName: newName });
}
  • 1
    thanks! So a couple more questions: 1. why are people saying props shouldn't change? 2. where do you put your data bootstrapping? In the initialization of the component like getInitialState, or do you put it outside of the component and render the component when data is available? – skaterdav85 Jan 16 '15 at 22:38
  • 20
    1. This is the 'functional' aspect of React. All data (almost) flows downwards. Since the prop is owned by the parent, only the parent should change it. Ideally, children should be stateless. That's not possible in practice (see forms documentation on the React site). 2. You can either feed it in at the top, which is a recommended practice, or you can store it in separate objects. One popular approach is Flux, which uses singleton objects called Stores. This is part of a larger architectural pattern. It is also open sourced from Facebook and designed to work with React. – Todd Jan 16 '15 at 23:32
  • 1
    so stores are just like big global variables? – SuperUberDuper Nov 7 '15 at 16:07
  • 2
    Yes, Flux stores are client side caches. There are also other patterns like the recently released Relay, from Facebook, and Redux. – Todd Nov 8 '15 at 18:26
  • 2
    One can see the working example of the same at codepen.io/kang/pen/Pqxyqr – Mohammad Arif Apr 4 '16 at 15:39

For parent-child communication, simply pass props.

Use state to store the data your current page needs in your controller-view.

Use props to pass data & event handlers down to your child components.

These lists should help guide you when working with data in your components.

Props

  • are immutable
    • which lets React do fast reference checks
  • are used to pass data down from your view-controller
    • your top level component
  • have better performance
    • use this to pass data to child components

State

  • should be managed in your view-controller
    • your top level component
  • is mutable
  • has worse performance
  • should not be accessed from child components
    • pass it down with props instead

For communication between two components that don't have a parent-child relationship, you can set up your own global event system. Subscribe to events in componentDidMount(), unsubscribe in componentWillUnmount(), and call setState() when you receive an event. Flux pattern is one of the possible ways to arrange this. - https://facebook.github.io/react/tips/communicate-between-components.html

What Components Should Have State?

Most of your components should simply take some data from props and render it. However, sometimes you need to respond to user input, a server request or the passage of time. For this you use state.

Try to keep as many of your components as possible stateless. By doing this you'll isolate the state to its most logical place and minimize redundancy, making it easier to reason about your application.

A common pattern is to create several stateless components that just render data, and have a stateful component above them in the hierarchy that passes its state to its children via props. The stateful component encapsulates all of the interaction logic, while the stateless components take care of rendering data in a declarative way. - https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/interactivity-and-dynamic-uis.html#what-components-should-have-state

What Should Go in State?

State should contain data that a component's event handlers may change to trigger a UI update. In real apps this data tends to be very small and JSON-serializable. When building a stateful component, think about the minimal possible representation of its state, and only store those properties in this.state. Inside of render() simply compute any other information you need based on this state. You'll find that thinking about and writing applications in this way tends to lead to the most correct application, since adding redundant or computed values to state means that you need to explicitly keep them in sync rather than rely on React computing them for you. - https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/interactivity-and-dynamic-uis.html#what-should-go-in-state

  • disagree, going all props is actually less performant to pass data down. Just set the store for the child components, then you don't have to deal with a mess of props and when props change you have to update your components. Just update your store and let the component get its data from its store. – PositiveGuy Jul 17 '16 at 6:07
  • 2
    Everything in my answers is directly out of the react documentation... – BentOnCoding Jul 17 '16 at 16:14
  • Can you tell me why props are more performance than states. thanks. – hqt Dec 18 '17 at 18:13

The props vs state summary I like best is here: https://github.com/uberVU/react-guide/blob/master/props-vs-state.md Big hat tip to those guys. Below is an edited version of that page:


props vs state

tl;dr If a Component needs to alter one of its attributes at some point in time, that attribute should be part of its state, otherwise it should just be a prop for that Component.


props

Props (short for properties) are a Component's configuration. They are received from above and immutable as far as the Component receiving them is concerned. A Component cannot change its props, but it is responsible for putting together the props of its child Components. Props do not have to just be data -- callback functions may be passed in as props.

state

The state is a data structure that starts with a default value when a Component mounts. It may be mutated across time, mostly as a result of user events.

A Component manages its own state internally. Besides setting an initial state, it has no business fiddling with the state of its children. You might conceptualize state as private to that component.

Changing props and state

                                                   props   state
    Can get initial value from parent Component?    Yes     Yes
    Can be changed by parent Component?             Yes     No
    Can set default values inside Component?*       Yes     Yes
    Can change inside Component?                    No      Yes
    Can set initial value for child Components?     Yes     Yes
    Can change in child Components?                 Yes     No
  • Note that both props and state initial values received from parents override default values defined inside a Component.

Should this Component have state?

State is optional. Since state increases complexity and reduces predictability, a Component without state is preferable. Even though you clearly can't do without state in an interactive app, you should avoid having too many Stateful Components.

Component types

Stateless Component Only props, no state. There's not much going on besides the render() function. Their logic revolves around the props they receive. This makes them very easy to follow, and to test.

Stateful Component Both props and state. These are used when your component must retain some state. This is a good place for client-server communication (XHR, web sockets, etc.), processing data and responding to user events. These sort of logistics should be encapsulated in a moderate number of Stateful Components, while all visualization and formatting logic should move downstream into many Stateless Components.

sources

  • what do you mean by "state initial value received from parent"? As far as I know the state is defined only in the scope of a single component and can not be changed from the outside directly. – Maxim Kuzmin Aug 25 '17 at 19:33

Most of the answers are confusing Beginners rather clarifying. It's very hard to relate and understand. You can understand it by relating it to Plain JS.

In simple words,

State is referred to the local state of the component which cannot be accessed and modified outside of the component and only can be used & modified inside the component.

Plain JS

const DummyFunction = () => {
  let name = 'Manoj';
  console.log(`Hey ${name}`)
}

React JS Equivalent

class DummyComponent extends React.Component {
  state = {
    name: 'Manoj'
  }
  render() {
    return <div>Hello {this.state.name}</div>;
  }

Props, on the other hand,make components reusable by giving components the ability to receive data from the parent component in the form of props.

Plain JS

const DummyFunction = (name) => {
  console.log(`Hey ${name}`)
}
DummyFunction('Manoj');
DummyFunction('Ajay');

React JS

class DummyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <div>Hello {this.props.name}</div>;
  }

}
// when using the component
<DummyComponent name="Manoj" />
<DummyComponent name="Ajay" />

Credits: https://medium.com/@manojsinghnegi

Article Linke:https://medium.com/@manojsinghnegi/react-state-vs-props-explained-51beebd73b21

props (short for “properties”) and state are both plain JavaScript objects. While both hold information that influences the output of render, they are different in one important way: props get passed to the component (similar to function parameters) whereas state is managed within the component (similar to variables declared within a function).

So simply state is limited to your current component but props can be pass to any component you wish... You can pass the state of the current component as prop to other components...

Also in React we have stateless components which only have props and not internal state...

The example below showing how they work in your app:

Parent (state-full component):

class SuperClock extends React.Component {

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {name: "Alireza", date: new Date().toLocaleTimeString()};
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <Clock name={this.state.name} date={this.state.date} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

Child (state-less component):

const Clock = ({name}, {date}) => (
    <div>
      <h1>{`Hi ${name}`}.</h1>
      <h2>{`It is ${date}`}.</h2>
    </div>
);

Basically, the difference is that state is something like attributes in OOP : it's something local to a class (component), used to better describe it. Props are like parameters - they are passed to a component from the caller of a component (the parent) : as if you called a function with certain parameters.

Both state and props in react are used to control data into a component, generally props are set by parent and passed to child components and they are fixed throughout the component. For data that is going to change, we have to use state. And props are immutable while states are mutable, if you want to change props you can do from parent component and then pass it to child components.

Props : Props is nothing but property of component and react component is nothing but a javascript function.

  class Welcome extends React.Component {
    render() {
      return <h1>Hello {this.props.name}</h1>;
    }
  }

const element = ;

here <Welcome name="Sara" /> passing a object {name : 'Sara'} as props of Welcome component. To pass data from one parent component to child component we use props. Props is immutable. During a component’s life cycle props should not change (consider them immutable).

State: state is accessible only within Component. To keep track of data within component we use state. we can change state by setState. If we need to pass state to child we have to pass it as props.

class Button extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {
      count: 0,
    };
  }

  updateCount() {
    this.setState((prevState, props) => {
      return { count: prevState.count + 1 }
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (<button
              onClick={() => this.updateCount()}
            >
              Clicked {this.state.count} times
            </button>);
  }
}

Basically, props and state are two ways the component can know what and how to render. Which part of the application state belongs to state and which to some top-level store, is more related to your app design, than to how React works. The simplest way to decide, IMO, is to think, whether this particular piece of data is useful for application as a whole, or it's some local information. Also, it's important to not duplicate state, so if some piece of data can be calculated from props - it should calculated from props.

For example, let's say you have some dropdown control (which wraps standart HTML select for custom styling), which can a) select some value from list, and b) be opened or closed (i.e., the options list displayed or hidden). Now, let's say your app displays a list of items of some sort and your dropdown controls filter for list entries. Then, it would be best to pass active filter value as a prop, and keep opened/closed state local. Also, to make it functional, you would pass an onChange handler from parent component, which would be called inside dropdown element and send updated information (new selected filter) to the store immediately. On the other hand, opened/closed state can be kept inside dropdown component, because the rest of the application doesn't really care if the control is opened, until user actually changes it value.

The following code is not completely working, it needs css and handling dropdown click/blur/change events, but I wanted to keep example minimal. Hope it helps to understand the difference.

const _store = {
    items: [
    { id: 1, label: 'One' },
    { id: 2, label: 'Two' },
    { id: 3, label: 'Three', new: true },
    { id: 4, label: 'Four', new: true },
    { id: 5, label: 'Five', important: true },
    { id: 6, label: 'Six' },
    { id: 7, label: 'Seven', important: true },
    ],
  activeFilter: 'important',
  possibleFilters: [
    { key: 'all', label: 'All' },
    { key: 'new', label: 'New' },
    { key: 'important', label: 'Important' }
  ]
}

function getFilteredItems(items, filter) {
    switch (filter) {
    case 'all':
        return items;

    case 'new':
        return items.filter(function(item) { return Boolean(item.new); });

    case 'important':
        return items.filter(function(item) { return Boolean(item.important); });

    default:
        return items;
  }
}

const App = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
            <div>
            My list:

            <ItemList   items={this.props.listItems} />
          <div>
            <Dropdown 
              onFilterChange={function(e) {
                _store.activeFilter = e.currentTarget.value;
                console.log(_store); // in real life, some action would be dispatched here
              }}
              filterOptions={this.props.filterOptions}
              value={this.props.activeFilter}
              />
          </div>
        </div>
      );
  }
});

const ItemList = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.props.items.map(function(item) {
          return <div key={item.id}>{item.id}: {item.label}</div>;
        })}
      </div>
    );
  }
});

const Dropdown = React.createClass({
    getInitialState: function() {
    return {
        isOpen: false
    };
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
        <div>
            <select 
            className="hidden-select" 
          onChange={this.props.onFilterChange}
          value={this.props.value}>
            {this.props.filterOptions.map(function(option) {
            return <option value={option.key} key={option.key}>{option.label}</option>
          })}
        </select>

        <div className={'custom-select' + (this.state.isOpen ? ' open' : '')} onClick={this.onClick}>
            <div className="selected-value">{this.props.activeFilter}</div>
          {this.props.filterOptions.map(function(option) {
            return <div data-value={option.key} key={option.key}>{option.label}</div>
          })}
        </div>
      </div>
    );
  },

  onClick: function(e) {
    this.setState({
        isOpen: !this.state.isOpen
    });
  }
});

ReactDOM.render(
  <App 
    listItems={getFilteredItems(_store.items, _store.activeFilter)} 
    filterOptions={_store.possibleFilters}
    activeFilter={_store.activeFilter}
    />,
  document.getElementById('root')
);

State is the way react deals with the information held by your component.

Let's suppose you have a component which need to fetch some data from the server. You usually would want to inform the user if the request is processing, if it has failed, etc. This is a piece of information which is just relevant for that specific component. This is where state enters the game.

Usually the best way to define state is as follows:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = { key1: value1, key2: value2 }    
  }
}

but in the latests implementations of react native you can just do:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  state = { key1: value1, key2: value2 }    
}

These two examples execute in the exact same way, it's just a syntax improvement.

So, what is different from just using object attributes as we always have in OO programming? Usually, the information held in your state is not meant to be static, it will change over time and your View will need to update in order to reflect this changes. State offers this functionality in a simple way.

State IS MEANT TO BE INMUTABLE! and I cannot make enough stress on this. What does this means? It means that you should NEVER do something like this.

 state.key2 = newValue;

The proper way of doing it is:

this.setState({ key2: newValue });

Using this.setState your component runs through the update cycle and if any part of the state changes, your Component render method will be called again to reflect this changes.

Check the react docs for an even more expanded explanation: https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/state-and-lifecycle.html

state - It is a special mutable property that hold a Component data. it has default value when Componet mounts.

props - It is a special property which is immutable by nature and used in case of pass by value from parent to child. props are just a communation channel between Components, always moving from top (parent) to buttom(child).

below are complete example of combinding the state & props :-

<!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
      <head>
        <meta charset="UTF-8" />
        <title>state&props example</title>

        <script src="https://unpkg.com/react@0.14.8/dist/react.min.js"></script>
        <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@0.14.8/dist/react-dom.min.js"></script>
        <script src="https://unpkg.com/babel-standalone@6.15.0/babel.min.js"></script>

      </head>
      <body>
      <div id="root"></div>
        <script type="text/babel">

            var TodoList = React.createClass({
                render(){
                    return <div className='tacos-list'>
                                {
                                    this.props.list.map( ( todo, index ) => {
                                    return <p key={ `taco-${ index }` }>{ todo }</p>;
                            })}
                            </div>;
                }
            });

            var Todo = React.createClass({
                getInitialState(){
                    return {
                        list : [ 'Banana', 'Apple', 'Beans' ]       
                    }
                },
                handleReverse(){
                    this.setState({list : this.state.list.reverse()});
                },
                render(){
                    return <div className='parent-component'>
                              <h3 onClick={this.handleReverse}>List of todo:</h3>
                              <TodoList list={ this.state.list }  />
                           </div>;
                }
            });

            ReactDOM.render(
                <Todo/>,
                document.getElementById('root')
            );

        </script>
      </body>
      </html>

Props simply are shorthand for properties. Props are how components talk to each other. If you’re at all familiar with React then you should know that props flow downwards from the parent component.

There is also the case that you can have default props so that props are set even if a parent component doesn’t pass props down.

This is why people refer to React as having uni-directional data flow. This takes a bit of getting your head around and I’ll probably blog on this later, but for now just remember: data flows from parent to child. Props are immutable (fancy word for it not changing)

So we’re happy. Components receive data from the parent. All sorted, right?

Well, not quite. What happens when a component receives data from someone other than the parent? What if the user inputs data directly to the component?

Well, this is why we have state.

STATE

Props shouldn’t change, so state steps up. Normally components don’t have state and so are referred to as stateless. A component using state is known as stateful. Feel free to drop that little tidbit at parties and watch people edge away from you.

So state is used so that a component can keep track of information in between any renders that it does. When you setState it updates the state object and then re-renders the component. This is super cool because that means React takes care of the hard work and is blazingly fast.

As a little example of state, here is a snippet from a search bar (worth checking out this course if you want to learn more about React)

Class SearchBar extends Component {
 constructor(props) {
  super(props);
this.state = { term: '' };
 }
render() {
  return (
   <div className="search-bar">
   <input 
   value={this.state.term}
   onChange={event => this.onInputChange(event.target.value)} />
   </div>
   );
 }
onInputChange(term) {
  this.setState({term});
  this.props.onSearchTermChange(term);
 }
}

SUMMARY

Props and State do similar things but are used in different ways. The majority of your components will probably be stateless.

Props are used to pass data from parent to child or by the component itself. They are immutable and thus will not be changed.

State is used for mutable data, or data that will change. This is particularly useful for user input. Think search bars for example. The user will type in data and this will update what they see.

In short.

props values can't be changed [immutable]

state values can be changed, using setState method [mutable]

In answer to the initial question about props being immutable, they are said to be immutable as far as the child component is concerned but are changeable in the parent.

React Components use state to READ/WRITE the internal variables that can be changed/mutated by for example:

this.setState({name: 'Lila'})

React props is special object that allow programmer to get variables and methods from Parent Component into Child Component.

It's something like a Windows and doors of the house. Props are also immutable Child Component can not change/update them.

There are couple of the methods that help to listen when props are changed by Parent Component.

This is my current point of view regarding the explanation between state and props

  1. State is like your local variable inside your component. You can manipulate the value of state by using set state. You can then pass the value of state to your child component for example.

  2. Props is the value that exactly located inside your redux store, this actually comes from state that's originated from reducer. Your component should be connected to redux to get the value from props. You can also pass your props value to your child component

In general, state of one component(parent) is prop for the child component.

  1. State resides within a component where as props are passed from parent to child.
  2. Props are generally immutable.

    class Parent extends React.Component {
        constructor() {
            super();
            this.state = {
                name : "John",
            }
        }
        render() {
            return (
                <Child name={this.state.name}>
            )
        }
    }
    
    class Child extends React.Component {
        constructor() {
            super();
        }
    
        render() {
            return(
                {this.props.name} 
            )
        }
    }
    

In the above code, we have a parent class(Parent) which has name as its state which is passed to the child component(Child class) as a prop and the child component renders it using {this.props.name}

State:

  1. states are mutable.
  2. states are associated with the individual components can't be used by other components.
  3. states are initialize on component mount.
  4. states are used for rendering dynamic changes within component.

props:

  1. props are immutable.
  2. you can pass props between components.
  3. props are mostly used to communicate between components.You can pass from parent to child directly. For passing from child to parent you need use concept of lifting up states.

class Parent extends React.Component{
  render()
  {
     return(
        <div>
            <Child name = {"ron"}/>
        </div>
      );
  }
}

class Child extends React.Component{
{
    render(){
      return(
         <div>
              {this.props.name}
        </div>
      );
     }
}

  • { "message": "Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token <", "filename": "stacksnippets.net/js";, "lineno": 17, "colno": 9 } – Niko Jojo Sep 8 at 6:36

You have some data that is being entered by users somewhere in the application.

  1. the component in which the data is being entered should have this data in its state because it needs to manipulate and change it during data entry

  2. anywhere else in the application the data should be passed down as props to all the other components

So yes the props are changing but they are changed at the 'source' and will then simply flow down from there. So props are immutable in the context of the component receiving them.

E.g. a reference data screen where users edit a list of suppliers would manage this in state, which would then have an action cause the updated data to be saved in ReferenceDataState which could be one level below AppState and then this supplier list would be passed as props to all the components that needed to use it.

Props are values, objects or arrays passed into a component on render. These props are often values needed within the component to create the UI, set certain default functionality or used to populate fields. Props can also come in the form of functions passed down from the parent component that can be invoked by the child.

State is managed within the component (child or parent).

Here is a definition I found to support this:

enter image description here

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