0

I am looking for this stackoverflow question to be answered in Javascript.

So if my input is "word", the function should return:

word, Word, wOrd, WOrd, woRd, WoRd, etc..

here's what i have so far but it only produces the permutations (doesn't capitalize anything)

var perm = function(str){
var results = [];

var combos = function(reference, appendTo){
 appendTo = appendTo || "";
 if(reference.length === 0) {
  results.push(appendTo);
 }
 for(var i = 0; i < reference.length; i++){
  var current = reference.splice(i, 1);
  combos(reference, appendTo+current);
   reference.splice(i, 0, current)
 }
} 
combos(str.split(""));
return results;
}
perm("word");
  • So where's your code? I can't see anything to comment on. – Mörre Jan 16 '15 at 20:23
  • I'm going to go ahead and close this as a "work order." If this is a troubleshooting question, show us the work you have so far, and describe the difficulty you are having solving the problem. – Robert Harvey Jan 16 '15 at 20:24
  • just like, you know, make a million randomy upper and lower case versions, then filter duplicates – dandavis Jan 16 '15 at 20:32
  • 1
    @dandavis: The actual solution is a bit more... focused than that. – Robert Harvey Jan 16 '15 at 20:32
  • @RobertHarvey: my answer is as focused as this question is on the ways of SO... – dandavis Jan 16 '15 at 20:34
3

It's as simple as generating permutations in any language with binary logic.

As a simple example of the snippet below, consider the following table where the left column is the binary representation of the current permutation and the right column is the resulting capitalization:

0000 | word
1000 | Word
0100 | wOrd
1100 | WOrd
...
1111 | WORD

// Used to display the results
const write = (msg) => {
  document.body.appendChild(document.createElement('div')).innerHTML = msg;
};

const input = "word";
const letters = input.split("");
const permCount = 1 << input.length;

for (let perm = 0; perm < permCount; perm++) {
  // Update the capitalization depending on the current permutation
  letters.reduce((perm, letter, i) => {
    letters[i] = (perm & 1) ? letter.toUpperCase() : letter.toLowerCase();
    return perm >> 1;
  }, perm);

  const result = letters.join("");
  write(result);
}

| improve this answer | |
  • thanks this works well. Can you explain how the second for loop works? Specifically I am wondering how it breaks out of the loop, I am not use to seeing for loops written this way. – user3068590 Jan 19 '15 at 19:55
  • Using for(...; j; ...) is equivalent to for(...; j !== 0; ...). Note the positioning of semicolons in the above code. We initialize two variables in the inner loop, then check the condition and then perform two operations on each iteration. While it isn't clean style-wise, it's rather straight forward if you're familiar with the concept of binary permutations. – Etheryte Jan 19 '15 at 20:41
  • Nit what if permutation of "word" but only 2 of characters are uppercased? – Roi May 25 '15 at 9:34
  • @Roi You can either add some additional checks to the above code to only keep the ones you want or write a slightly different method which only generates combinations with 2 uppercase chars. – Etheryte May 25 '15 at 11:57
1

With Nit's solution in mind, I wanted to offer a slightly refactored solution that may be easier to follow

  var perm = function(str){
    var results = [];
    var arr = str.split("");
    var len = Math.pow(arr.length, 2);

    for( var i = 0; i < len; i++ ){
      for( var k= 0, j = i; k < arr.length; k++, j >>=1){
        arr[k] = ( j & 1 ) ? arr[k].toUpperCase() : arr[k].toLowerCase();
      }
      var combo = arr.join("");
      results.push(combo);
    }
    return results;
  }

  perm("word");
| improve this answer | |
0

var s = "word";
var sp = s.split("");
for (var i = 0, l = 1 << s.length; i < l; i++) {
  for (var j = i, k = 0; j; j >>= 1, k++) {
    sp[k] = (j & 1) ? sp[k].toUpperCase() : sp[k].toLowerCase();
  }
  var st = sp.join("");
  var d = document.createElement("p");
  d.appendChild(document.createTextNode(st));
  document.body.appendChild(d);
}

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.