3

I need to update an existing Laravel application by migrating and seeding the database.

I have a table like the following:

items

  • id
  • name

And I want to edit the database to look like:

items

  • id
  • name
  • type_id (new column)

types (new table)

  • id
  • name

With type_id being a not-null foreign key to the types table.

The types table will be seeded with a Laravel seeder in a following operation. This seeder will be called after each application update and truncate/reinsert some "static" data that only change with updates of the application. It is configured in a way like Laravel : Migrations & Seeding for production data for the local/production differences

Everything runs fine when starting from scratch on local database. But on the production database, there are already many records. As it is a not-null key, the migration fails when pushing to this database (actually, a copy of that database for testing)

As a migrating solution, I'd like to add the first type record to every existing item, but I cannot set the foreign key during the migration, as the items table is empty at this stage, and I cannot leave it empty until the seeding, as the migration don't pass.

There are some things I think to:

  • Disable the foreign key checks on the database during the whole update, but I'd prefer a solution that allows me to simply push my repository to the server and start my automated deployment script (which essentially call artisan migrate followed by artisan db:seed).
  • Call the seeder from the migration just after the creation of the types table, but I'm not sure that is a good practice

What should I do ?

Edit: Here's my working migration code using @lukasgeiter answer:

public function up()
{
    DB::statement('SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0');

    Schema::table('items', function(Blueprint $table)
    {
        $table->integer('type_id')->unsigned()->index()->after('name');
    });

    DB::update('update items set type_id = 1');

    Schema::table('items', function(Blueprint $table)
    {
        $table->foreign('type_id')->references('id')->on('types');

        // Here I do other stuff to this table
    });

    DB::statement('SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1');
}
4

You can just disable foreign key checks inside the migration by using DB::statement and SQL.

DB::statement('SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0');
// add column
DB::statement('SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1');
  • But when do I run my Seeder ? If I reenable the foreign keys after adding the column without doing anything else it will fail (null still not permitted) – Kaktus Jan 17 '15 at 23:05
  • I thought you'd seed type_id with a valid value? – lukasgeiter Jan 17 '15 at 23:07
  • Yes it's right I will set the right foreign keys but the types table is still empty at this time, it will only be seeded at the next step of the deployment (artisan db:seed) – Kaktus Jan 17 '15 at 23:13
  • I still think this should work though. First you turn key checks off, create the column and turn them on again. Then (when seeding) you seed the types table and afterwards update the type_id in items. Am I wrong? – lukasgeiter Jan 17 '15 at 23:26
  • No it was me who was wrong =| . I thought dealing with the database that way would cause an error but it actually works as expected. I'll add my working code in the question. Thanks ! – Kaktus Jan 17 '15 at 23:55

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