33

As I currently see it I have 5 possible database profiles

  • CI testing -> h2 mem
  • developer environment (could be test or app run) -> h2 mem, or h2 file, or postgres
  • production -> postgres (ideally credentials not stored in the git/war)

currently I have postgres configured for running the application, and h2 configured for testing via having a different application.properties in java/resources vs test/resources

what's the simplest way to have the database connection information change for these scenarios?

  • which build tool are you using? – Master Slave Jan 18 '15 at 6:25
  • 5
    Profiles. Spring Boot will load the default application.properties and, when specified, also a profile specific one. This is explained here in the documentation. – M. Deinum Jan 18 '15 at 11:00
  • @MasterSlave maven – xenoterracide Jan 18 '15 at 18:01
56

As M. Deinum mentions in his comment, the simplest way to do this is to use profile specific configuration.

Spring Boot allows you to have one common configuration file (application.properties) and then multiple other files, each specific to a profile (application-${profile}.properties).

For instance:

  • application.properties - Common configuration
  • application-dev.properties - Configuration for dev profile
  • application-ci.properties - Configuration for ci profiles

If your application runs with "ci" profile for instance, the default configuration file as well as the ci configuration file (which would contain the datasource configuration properties for ci profile) will be loaded.

To switch profiles you can use one of the following options:

  • JVM property: -Dspring.profiles.active=ci
  • Command line switch: --spring.profiles.active=dev

For unit tests you can use @ActiveProfiles("test") annotation on your test classes to tell Spring that unit tests should be run with test profile.

Also if you don't want to store production database credentials along with your source code, you can specify external configuration file when you deploy your app in production:

  • Using command line switch: --spring.config.location=/srv/myapp/config.properties
  • Using a JVM property: -Dspring.config.location=/srv/myapp/config.properties
  • I am trying to do the same. But, the configuration for the hsqldb aren't just picked up. Can you post a sample for application-dev.properties? – divinedragon Jul 29 '16 at 9:52
  • 1
    How do you activate a profile? Nothing I do seems to work. – dleerob Sep 28 '16 at 5:25
  • 1
    -Dspring.profiles.active=ci is a "VM argument". Look for it in eclipse run configuration -> arguments – Kedar Javalkar Nov 11 '17 at 10:19
  • if you need to keep existing properties and externalize only specific properties such as DB credentials, you can use --spring.config.additional-location=/srv/myapp/config.properties – Unknown Oct 5 '18 at 8:35
  • This should be great for multiple datasources like prod, qa and dev. without any java code changes it works well only by creating property file as specified above – Sasikumar Murugesan Nov 27 '18 at 12:22
2

Compact answer for the above scenario would be by creating a single application.yml file and creating different profiles based on the requirement, in your case -dev, -ci and -prod and providing the DB information accordingly.

Sample example is:

spring:
  profiles.active: development

---
spring:
  profiles: development
datasource:
  db-person:
      url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_person_dev
      username: username
      password: pwd
      driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
      test-on-borrow: true
      validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual
  db-contract:
      url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_contract_dev
      username: username
      password: pwd
      driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
      test-on-borrow: true
      validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual

    ---

    spring:
      profiles: test
    datasource:
      db-person:
          url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_person_test
          username: username
          password: pwd
          driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
          test-on-borrow: true
          validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual
      db-contract:
          url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_contract_test
          username: username
          password: pwd
          driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
          test-on-borrow: true
          validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual

    ---

    spring:
      profiles: production
    datasource:
      db-person:
          url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_person_prod
          username: username
          password: pwd
          driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
          test-on-borrow: true
          validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual
      db-contract:
          url: jdbc:oracle:thin:@db_contract_prod
          username: username
          password: pwd
          driver-class-name: oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
          test-on-borrow: true
          validation-query: SELECT 1 FROM dual

    ---

For further understanding and simple example you can refer this link.

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