How to generate a date time stamp, using the format standards for ISO 8601 and RFC 3339?

The goal is a string that looks like this:

"2015-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"

Format:

  • year, month, day, as "XXXX-XX-XX"
  • the letter "T" as a separator
  • hour, minute, seconds, milliseconds, as "XX:XX:XX.XXX".
  • the letter "Z" as a zone designator for zero offset, a.k.a. UTC, GMT, Zulu time.

Best case:

  • Swift source code that is simple, short, and straightforward.
  • No need to use any additional framework, subproject, cocoapod, C code, etc.

I've searched StackOverflow, Google, Apple, etc. and haven't found a Swift answer to this.

The classes that seem most promising are NSDate, NSDateFormatter, NSTimeZone.

Related Q&A: How do I get ISO 8601 date in iOS?

Here's the best I've come up with so far:

var now = NSDate()
var formatter = NSDateFormatter()
formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'"
formatter.timeZone = NSTimeZone(forSecondsFromGMT: 0)
println(formatter.stringFromDate(now))
  • 5
    Note that iOS10+ SIMPLY INCLUDES ISO 8601 BUILT-IN .. it will just autocomplete for you. – Fattie Apr 27 '17 at 12:46
  • 2
    @Fattie And - how can it handle that last .234Z milliseconds Zulu/UTC part of the timestamp? Answer: Matt Longs @ stackoverflow.com/a/42101630/3078330 – smat88dd Jun 9 '17 at 12:30
  • 1
    @smat88dd -- fantastic tip, thanks. I had no clue there were "options on a formatter", weird and wild! – Fattie Jun 9 '17 at 17:03
  • I'm looking for a solution that works on linux. – neoneye Sep 20 at 14:23
  • @neoneye Just use the old version (plain DateFormatter) and change the calendar iso8601 to gregorian stackoverflow.com/a/28016692/2303865 – Leo Dabus Oct 31 at 12:38
up vote 295 down vote accepted

Xcode 9 • Swift 4 • iOS 11 or later

as mentioned in comments by @keno ISO8601DateFormatter now supports .withFractionalSeconds formatOptions in iOS11 or later:

extension Formatter {
    static let iso8601: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
        formatter.formatOptions = [.withInternetDateTime, .withFractionalSeconds]
        return formatter
    }()
}

Playground testing:

let dateString = Formatter.iso8601.string(from: Date())   // "2018-01-23T03:06:46.232Z"
if let date = Formatter.iso8601.date(from: dateString)  {
    print(date)   // "2018-01-23 03:06:46 +0000\n"
}

Xcode 8.2 • Swift 3.0.2

extension Formatter {
    static let iso8601: DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = DateFormatter()
        formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
        formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
        formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
        formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSXXXXX"
        return formatter
    }()
}
extension Date {
    var iso8601: String {
        return Formatter.iso8601.string(from: self)
    }
}

extension String {
    var dateFromISO8601: Date? {
        return Formatter.iso8601.date(from: self)   // "Mar 22, 2017, 10:22 AM"
    }
}

Usage:

let stringFromDate = Date().iso8601    // "2017-03-22T13:22:13.933Z"

if let dateFromString = stringFromDate.dateFromISO8601 {
    print(dateFromString.iso8601)      // "2017-03-22T13:22:13.933Z"
}

enter image description here

  • 3
    It'd be useful to add opposite conversion extension: extension String { var dateFormattedISO8601: NSDate? {return NSDate.Date.formatterISO8601.dateFromString(self)} } – Vive May 30 '16 at 10:50
  • 1
    Just an note that this looses a bit of precision so it's important to make sure equality of dates is compared via the generated string and not timeInterval. let now = NSDate() let stringFromDate = now.iso8601 let dateFromString = stringFromDate.dateFromISO8601! XCTAssertEqual(now.timeIntervalSince1970, dateFromString.timeIntervalSince1970) – pixelrevision Jun 18 '16 at 16:59
  • 7
    Needless to say, if you don't need milliseconds, the new iOS 10 ISO8601DateFormatter simplifies the process. I've issued a bug report (27242248) to Apple, requesting them to expand this new formatter to offer the ability to specify milliseconds, too (as this new formatter is not of use for many of us without the milliseconds). – Rob Jul 15 '16 at 22:28
  • 2
    @manRo "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ssXXXXX" – Leo Dabus Oct 14 '16 at 2:22
  • 3
    @LeoDabus yes, but this is the first result for "Swift iso8601". My comment was meant to warn other developers who come across this in the future and was not directed at OP. – thislooksfun Jul 5 '17 at 1:10

Remember to set the locale to en_US_POSIX as described in Technical Q&A1480. In Swift 3:

let date = Date()
let formatter = DateFormatter()
formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZZZZZ"
formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
print(formatter.string(from: date))

The issue is that if you're on a device which is using a non-Gregorian calendar, the year will not conform to RFC3339/ISO8601 unless you specify the locale as well as the timeZone and dateFormat string.

Or you can use ISO8601DateFormatter to get you out of the weeds of setting locale and timeZone yourself:

let date = Date()
let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
formatter.formatOptions.insert(.withFractionalSeconds)  // this is only available effective iOS 11 and macOS 10.13
print(formatter.string(from: date))

For Swift 2 rendition, see previous revision of this answer.

  • why we should set the locale to en_US_POSIX ? even if we are not in US ? – mnemonic23 Dec 13 '17 at 4:38
  • 1
    Well, you need some consistent locale and the convention of the ISO 8601/RFC 3999 standards is that format offered by en_US_POSIX. It's the lingua franca for exchanging dates on the web. And you can't have it misinterpreting dates if one calendar was used on device when saving a date string and another when the string is read back in later. Also, you need a format that is guaranteed to never change (which is why you use en_US_POSIX and not en_US). See Technical Q&A 1480 or those RFC/ISO standards for more information. – Rob Dec 13 '17 at 10:23

If you want to use the ISO8601DateFormatter() with a date from a Rails 4+ JSON feed (and don't need millis of course), you need to set a few options on the formatter for it to work right otherwise the the date(from: string) function will return nil. Here's what I'm using:

extension Date {
    init(dateString:String) {
        self = Date.iso8601Formatter.date(from: dateString)!
    }

    static let iso8601Formatter: ISO8601DateFormatter = {
        let formatter = ISO8601DateFormatter()
        formatter.formatOptions = [.withFullDate,
                                          .withTime,
                                          .withDashSeparatorInDate,
                                          .withColonSeparatorInTime]
        return formatter
    }()
}

Here's the result of using the options verses not in a playground screenshot:

enter image description here

  • You would need to include in the options also the .withFractionalSeconds but I already tried that and it keeps throwing an error libc++abi.dylib: terminating with uncaught exception of type NSException. – Leo Dabus Oct 12 '17 at 1:36
  • @MEnnabah It works fine for me in Swift 4. Are you getting an error? – Matt Long Nov 6 '17 at 16:22
  • @LeoDabus, got the same error as yours, did you solve it? – freeman Dec 13 '17 at 3:36
  • custom JSONDecoder DateDecodingStrategy stackoverflow.com/a/46458771/2303865 – Leo Dabus Dec 13 '17 at 3:40
  • @freeman If you would like to preserve the Date with all its fractional seconds I suggest to use a double (time interval since reference date) when saving/receiving your date to the server. And use the default date decoding strategy .deferredToDate when using Codable protocol – Leo Dabus Dec 13 '17 at 3:47

In the future the format might need to be changed which could be a small head ache having date.dateFromISO8601 calls everywhere in an app. Use a class and protocol to wrap the implementation, changing the date time format call in one place will be simpler. Use RFC3339 if possible, its a more complete representation. DateFormatProtocol and DateFormat is great for dependency injection.

class AppDelegate: UIResponder, UIApplicationDelegate {

    internal static let rfc3339DateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZZZZZ"
    internal static let localeEnUsPosix = "en_US_POSIX"
}

import Foundation

protocol DateFormatProtocol {

    func format(date: NSDate) -> String
    func parse(date: String) -> NSDate?

}


import Foundation

class DateFormat:  DateFormatProtocol {

    func format(date: NSDate) -> String {
        return date.rfc3339
    }

    func parse(date: String) -> NSDate? {
        return date.rfc3339
    }

}


extension NSDate {

    struct Formatter {
        static let rfc3339: NSDateFormatter = {
            let formatter = NSDateFormatter()
            formatter.calendar = NSCalendar(calendarIdentifier: NSCalendarIdentifierISO8601)
            formatter.locale = NSLocale(localeIdentifier: AppDelegate.localeEnUsPosix)
            formatter.timeZone = NSTimeZone(forSecondsFromGMT: 0)
            formatter.dateFormat = rfc3339DateFormat
            return formatter
        }()
    }

    var rfc3339: String { return Formatter.rfc3339.stringFromDate(self) }
}

extension String {
    var rfc3339: NSDate? {
        return NSDate.Formatter.rfc3339.dateFromString(self)
    }
}



class DependencyService: DependencyServiceProtocol {

    private var dateFormat: DateFormatProtocol?

    func setDateFormat(dateFormat: DateFormatProtocol) {
        self.dateFormat = dateFormat
    }

    func getDateFormat() -> DateFormatProtocol {
        if let dateFormatObject = dateFormat {

            return dateFormatObject
        } else {
            let dateFormatObject = DateFormat()
            dateFormat = dateFormatObject

            return dateFormatObject
        }
    }

}

There is a new ISO8601DateFormatter class that let's you create a string with just one line. For backwards compatibility I used an old C-library. I hope this is useful for someone.

Swift 3.0

extension Date {
    var iso8601: String {
        if #available(OSX 10.12, iOS 10.0, watchOS 3.0, tvOS 10.0, *) {
            return ISO8601DateFormatter.string(from: self, timeZone: TimeZone.current, formatOptions: .withInternetDateTime)
        } else {
            var buffer = [CChar](repeating: 0, count: 25)
            var time = time_t(self.timeIntervalSince1970)
            strftime_l(&buffer, buffer.count, "%FT%T%z", localtime(&time), nil)
            return String(cString: buffer)
        }
    }
}

To further compliment Andrés Torres Marroquín and Leo Dabus, I have a version that preserves fractional seconds. I can't find it documented anywhere, but Apple truncate fractional seconds to the microsecond (3 digits of precision) on both input and output (even though specified using SSSSSSS, contrary to Unicode tr35-31).

I should stress that this is probably not necessary for most use cases. Dates online do not typically need millisecond precision, and when they do, it is often better to use a different data format. But sometimes one must interoperate with a pre-existing system in a particular way.

Xcode 8/9 and Swift 3.0-3.2

extension Date {
    struct Formatter {
        static let iso8601: DateFormatter = {
            let formatter = DateFormatter()
            formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
            formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
            formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(identifier: "UTC")
            formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSSSSXXXXX"
            return formatter
        }()
    }

    var iso8601: String {
        // create base Date format 
         var formatted = DateFormatter.iso8601.string(from: self)

        // Apple returns millisecond precision. find the range of the decimal portion
         if let fractionStart = formatted.range(of: "."),
             let fractionEnd = formatted.index(fractionStart.lowerBound, offsetBy: 7, limitedBy: formatted.endIndex) {
             let fractionRange = fractionStart.lowerBound..<fractionEnd
            // replace the decimal range with our own 6 digit fraction output
             let microseconds = self.timeIntervalSince1970 - floor(self.timeIntervalSince1970)
             var microsecondsStr = String(format: "%.06f", microseconds)
             microsecondsStr.remove(at: microsecondsStr.startIndex)
             formatted.replaceSubrange(fractionRange, with: microsecondsStr)
        }
         return formatted
    }
}

extension String {
    var dateFromISO8601: Date? {
        guard let parsedDate = Date.Formatter.iso8601.date(from: self) else {
            return nil
        }

        var preliminaryDate = Date(timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate: floor(parsedDate.timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate))

        if let fractionStart = self.range(of: "."),
            let fractionEnd = self.index(fractionStart.lowerBound, offsetBy: 7, limitedBy: self.endIndex) {
            let fractionRange = fractionStart.lowerBound..<fractionEnd
            let fractionStr = self.substring(with: fractionRange)

            if var fraction = Double(fractionStr) {
                fraction = Double(floor(1000000*fraction)/1000000)
                preliminaryDate.addTimeInterval(fraction)
            }
        }
        return preliminaryDate
    }
}
  • This is the best answer in my opinion in that it allows one to get to a microsecond level of precision where all the other solutions truncate at milliseconds. – Michael A. McCloskey Sep 29 '17 at 19:31
  • If you would like to preserve the Date with all its fractional seconds you should use just a double (time interval since reference date) when saving/receiving your date to the server. – Leo Dabus Dec 13 '17 at 3:45
  • @LeoDabus yes, if you control the whole system and don't need to interoperate. Like I said in the answer, this isn't necessary for most users. But we don't all always have control over the data formatting in web APIs, and as Android and Python (at least) preserve 6 digits of fractional precision, it is sometimes necessary to follow suit. – Eli Burke Dec 14 '17 at 14:57

In my case I have to convert the DynamoDB - lastUpdated column (Unix Timestamp) to Normal Time.

The initial value of lastUpdated was : 1460650607601 - converted down to 2016-04-14 16:16:47 +0000 via :

   if let lastUpdated : String = userObject.lastUpdated {

                let epocTime = NSTimeInterval(lastUpdated)! / 1000 // convert it from milliseconds dividing it by 1000

                let unixTimestamp = NSDate(timeIntervalSince1970: epocTime) //convert unix timestamp to Date
                let dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter()
                dateFormatter.timeZone = NSTimeZone()
                dateFormatter.locale = NSLocale.currentLocale() // NSLocale(localeIdentifier: "en_US_POSIX")
                dateFormatter.dateFormat =  "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZZZZZ"
                dateFormatter.dateFromString(String(unixTimestamp))

                let updatedTimeStamp = unixTimestamp
                print(updatedTimeStamp)

            }

Uses ISO8601DateFormatter on iOS10 or newer.

Uses DateFormatter on iOS9 or older.

Swift 4

protocol DateFormatterProtocol {
    func string(from date: Date) -> String
    func date(from string: String) -> Date?
}

extension DateFormatter: DateFormatterProtocol {}

@available(iOS 10.0, *)
extension ISO8601DateFormatter: DateFormatterProtocol {}

struct DateFormatterShared {
    static let iso8601: DateFormatterProtocol = {
        if #available(iOS 10, *) {
            return ISO8601DateFormatter()
        } else {
            // iOS 9
            let formatter = DateFormatter()
            formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
            formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
            formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
            formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSXXXXX"
            return formatter
        }
    }()
}

To complement the version of Leo Dabus, I added support for projects written Swift and Objective-C, also added support for the optional milliseconds, probably isn't the best but you would get the point:

Xcode 8 and Swift 3

extension Date {
    struct Formatter {
        static let iso8601: DateFormatter = {
            let formatter = DateFormatter()
            formatter.calendar = Calendar(identifier: .iso8601)
            formatter.locale = Locale(identifier: "en_US_POSIX")
            formatter.timeZone = TimeZone(secondsFromGMT: 0)
            formatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSXXXXX"
            return formatter
        }()
    }

    var iso8601: String {
        return Formatter.iso8601.string(from: self)
    }
}


extension String {
    var dateFromISO8601: Date? {
        var data = self
        if self.range(of: ".") == nil {
            // Case where the string doesn't contain the optional milliseconds
            data = data.replacingOccurrences(of: "Z", with: ".000000Z")
        }
        return Date.Formatter.iso8601.date(from: data)
    }
}


extension NSString {
    var dateFromISO8601: Date? {
        return (self as String).dateFromISO8601
    }
}

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.