186

What's the easiest way to use a linked list in python? In scheme, a linked list is defined simply by '(1 2 3 4 5). Python's lists, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], and tuples, (1, 2, 3, 4, 5), are not, in fact, linked lists, and linked lists have some nice properties such as constant-time concatenation, and being able to reference separate parts of them. Make them immutable and they are really easy to work with!

2
  • 13
    This might help you visualize it.. pythontutor.com/…
    – user1889082
    Dec 9, 2012 at 7:41
  • @user1889082 awesome! it really helps me to understand some python concept
    – Jerry An
    Dec 19, 2020 at 14:19

29 Answers 29

160

For some needs, a deque may also be useful. You can add and remove items on both ends of a deque at O(1) cost.

from collections import deque
d = deque([1,2,3,4])

print d
for x in d:
    print x
print d.pop(), d
9
  • 22
    While deque is a useful data type, it is not a linked list (though it is implemented using doubly linked list at C level). So it answers the question "what would you use instead of linked lists in Python?" and in that case the first answer should be (for some needs) an ordinary Python list (it is also not a linked list).
    – jfs
    Oct 19, 2013 at 20:26
  • 4
    @J.F.Sebastian: I almost agree with you :) I think the question this answers is rather: "What's the pythonic way to solve a problem that uses a linked list in other languages". It's not that linked lists aren't useful, it's just that problems where a deque doesn't work is very rare. Oct 20, 2013 at 20:46
  • 9
    It has nothing to do with "Pythonic": a linked list is a different data structure than a deque, and across the various operations the two support, they have different running times.
    – Thanatos
    Apr 7, 2014 at 20:48
  • 6
    @dimo414: Linked lists typically prohibit indexing (no linked_list[n]) because it would be O(n). Dequeues allow it, and perform it in O(1). However, linked lists, given an iterator into the list, can allow O(1) insertion and removal, whereas deques cannot (it's O(n), like a vector). (Except at the front and end, where both deques and linked lists are both O(1). (though the deque is likely amortized O(1). The linked list is not.)
    – Thanatos
    Jul 19, 2014 at 6:39
  • 3
    @MadPhysicist "It [deque] behaves like a linked list in almost every way, even if the name is different." — it is either wrong or meaningless: it is wrong because linked lists may provide different guarantees for time complexities e.g., you can remove an element (known position) from a linked list in O(1) while deque doesn't promise it (it is O(n)). If "almost every way" allows to ignore the difference in big O then your statement is meaningless because we could use a Python builtin list as a deque if it weren't for pop(0), insert(0,v) big O guarantees.
    – jfs
    Sep 13, 2016 at 11:20
73

I wrote this up the other day

#! /usr/bin/env python

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.data = None # contains the data
        self.next = None # contains the reference to the next node


class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self):
        self.cur_node = None

    def add_node(self, data):
        new_node = Node() # create a new node
        new_node.data = data
        new_node.next = self.cur_node # link the new node to the 'previous' node.
        self.cur_node = new_node #  set the current node to the new one.

    def list_print(self):
        node = self.cur_node # cant point to ll!
        while node:
            print node.data
            node = node.next



ll = LinkedList()
ll.add_node(1)
ll.add_node(2)
ll.add_node(3)

ll.list_print()
3
  • how would you be able to go through the list and search for a specific node with specific data?
    – locoboy
    Aug 25, 2011 at 17:17
  • 1
    @locoboy the code to do that would be similar in logic to the code in list_print().
    – Dennis
    Dec 11, 2013 at 19:28
  • 1
    Displays the list in reverse order
    – user9652688
    Oct 20, 2019 at 0:50
71

Here is some list functions based on Martin v. Löwis's representation:

cons   = lambda el, lst: (el, lst)
mklist = lambda *args: reduce(lambda lst, el: cons(el, lst), reversed(args), None)
car = lambda lst: lst[0] if lst else lst
cdr = lambda lst: lst[1] if lst else lst
nth = lambda n, lst: nth(n-1, cdr(lst)) if n > 0 else car(lst)
length  = lambda lst, count=0: length(cdr(lst), count+1) if lst else count
begin   = lambda *args: args[-1]
display = lambda lst: begin(w("%s " % car(lst)), display(cdr(lst))) if lst else w("nil\n")

where w = sys.stdout.write

Although doubly linked lists are famously used in Raymond Hettinger's ordered set recipe, singly linked lists have no practical value in Python.

I've never used a singly linked list in Python for any problem except educational.

Thomas Watnedal suggested a good educational resource How to Think Like a Computer Scientist, Chapter 17: Linked lists:

A linked list is either:

  • the empty list, represented by None, or
  • a node that contains a cargo object and a reference to a linked list.

    class Node: 
      def __init__(self, cargo=None, next=None): 
        self.car = cargo 
        self.cdr = next    
      def __str__(self): 
        return str(self.car)
    
    def display(lst):
      if lst:
        w("%s " % lst)
        display(lst.cdr)
      else:
        w("nil\n")
    
32
  • 38
    You say: You've never used a singly linked list in Python for any problem except educational. That's good for you :-) But I can assure you: There ARE problems in the real world where a linked list will provide an ideal solution :-) That's why I scanned StackOverflow for linked lists in the first place :-)
    – Regis May
    Jan 27, 2017 at 21:30
  • 9
    @RegisMay: would you mind providing a link to a specific practical code example? (note: it should be "a singly linked list in Python" "In real world": describe the benefits for your example e.g., readability, performance or other "practical value" of your choosing). I've made a similar request in the past: in 8 years, zero links except for doubly linked lists used in Raymond Hettinger's ordered set recipe--perhaps, it might be explained that only programmers new to Python read this question--your input would be valuable and highly appreciated.
    – jfs
    Jan 27, 2017 at 22:02
  • 3
    Oh, sorry. I'm not a native English speaker and confused "a singly linked list" with "a single linked list". Nevertheless I require a (double) linked list - which doesn't exist in python. A deque doesn't help as I need direct access to each single element without iterating over all elements. My goal: I want to implement a cache. Nevertheless: If my imperfection in the English language renders my comments out of place please delete these comments. Sorry for any inconvenience.
    – Regis May
    Jan 29, 2017 at 19:00
  • 5
    One practical advantage of a singly linked list over doubly linked lists or arrays (which Python uses internally for lists) is that two linked lists can share a tail. This is very useful for dynamic algorithms that require saved values from previous iterations where sharing list tails can reduce memory complexity from quadratic to linear and eliminate time overhead due to copying.
    – saolof
    Jun 25, 2017 at 12:08
  • 3
    That rosettacode link was a real world example, which uses a simulated linked list in place of an actual linked list. Take a look at it, rewrite it to use an actual linked list, for improved clarity and readability, and there you have the real world example of a linked list being used to improve existing code. And, secondly, the longest increasing subsequence algorithm is used in the real world, in statistics, so there you have it. Q.E.D. :). Beyond that, let's just agree to disagree. :)
    – Gino
    Sep 26, 2017 at 21:06
38

The accepted answer is rather complicated. Here is a more standard design:

L = LinkedList()
L.insert(1)
L.insert(1)
L.insert(2)
L.insert(4)
print L
L.clear()
print L

It is a simple LinkedList class based on the straightforward C++ design and Chapter 17: Linked lists, as recommended by Thomas Watnedal.

class Node:
    def __init__(self, value = None, next = None):
        self.value = value
        self.next = next

    def __str__(self):
        return 'Node ['+str(self.value)+']'

class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self):
        self.first = None
        self.last = None

    def insert(self, x):
        if self.first == None:
            self.first = Node(x, None)
            self.last = self.first
        elif self.last == self.first:
            self.last = Node(x, None)
            self.first.next = self.last
        else:
            current = Node(x, None)
            self.last.next = current
            self.last = current

    def __str__(self):
        if self.first != None:
            current = self.first
            out = 'LinkedList [\n' +str(current.value) +'\n'
            while current.next != None:
                current = current.next
                out += str(current.value) + '\n'
            return out + ']'
        return 'LinkedList []'

    def clear(self):
        self.__init__()
2
  • 9
    I like this answer. One nit, I believe that X is None is preferred over ==. stackoverflow.com/a/2988117/1740227
    – mateor
    Aug 16, 2014 at 4:17
  • Is the second branch of insert not a particular case of the third, so that you can entirely remove the elif clause?
    – Jaime
    Jan 23, 2016 at 4:49
17

Immutable lists are best represented through two-tuples, with None representing NIL. To allow simple formulation of such lists, you can use this function:

def mklist(*args):
    result = None
    for element in reversed(args):
        result = (element, result)
    return result

To work with such lists, I'd rather provide the whole collection of LISP functions (i.e. first, second, nth, etc), than introducing methods.

13

Here's a slightly more complex version of a linked list class, with a similar interface to python's sequence types (ie. supports indexing, slicing, concatenation with arbitrary sequences etc). It should have O(1) prepend, doesn't copy data unless it needs to and can be used pretty interchangably with tuples.

It won't be as space or time efficient as lisp cons cells, as python classes are obviously a bit more heavyweight (You could improve things slightly with "__slots__ = '_head','_tail'" to reduce memory usage). It will have the desired big O performance characteristics however.

Example of usage:

>>> l = LinkedList([1,2,3,4])
>>> l
LinkedList([1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> l.head, l.tail
(1, LinkedList([2, 3, 4]))

# Prepending is O(1) and can be done with:
LinkedList.cons(0, l)
LinkedList([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])
# Or prepending arbitrary sequences (Still no copy of l performed):
[-1,0] + l
LinkedList([-1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4])

# Normal list indexing and slice operations can be performed.
# Again, no copy is made unless needed.
>>> l[1], l[-1], l[2:]
(2, 4, LinkedList([3, 4]))
>>> assert l[2:] is l.next.next

# For cases where the slice stops before the end, or uses a
# non-contiguous range, we do need to create a copy.  However
# this should be transparent to the user.
>>> LinkedList(range(100))[-10::2]
LinkedList([90, 92, 94, 96, 98])

Implementation:

import itertools

class LinkedList(object):
    """Immutable linked list class."""

    def __new__(cls, l=[]):
        if isinstance(l, LinkedList): return l # Immutable, so no copy needed.
        i = iter(l)
        try:
            head = i.next()
        except StopIteration:
            return cls.EmptyList   # Return empty list singleton.

        tail = LinkedList(i)

        obj = super(LinkedList, cls).__new__(cls)
        obj._head = head
        obj._tail = tail
        return obj

    @classmethod
    def cons(cls, head, tail):
        ll =  cls([head])
        if not isinstance(tail, cls):
            tail = cls(tail)
        ll._tail = tail
        return ll

    # head and tail are not modifiable
    @property  
    def head(self): return self._head

    @property
    def tail(self): return self._tail

    def __nonzero__(self): return True

    def __len__(self):
        return sum(1 for _ in self)

    def __add__(self, other):
        other = LinkedList(other)

        if not self: return other   # () + l = l
        start=l = LinkedList(iter(self))  # Create copy, as we'll mutate

        while l:
            if not l._tail: # Last element?
                l._tail = other
                break
            l = l._tail
        return start

    def __radd__(self, other):
        return LinkedList(other) + self

    def __iter__(self):
        x=self
        while x:
            yield x.head
            x=x.tail

    def __getitem__(self, idx):
        """Get item at specified index"""
        if isinstance(idx, slice):
            # Special case: Avoid constructing a new list, or performing O(n) length 
            # calculation for slices like l[3:].  Since we're immutable, just return
            # the appropriate node. This becomes O(start) rather than O(n).
            # We can't do this for  more complicated slices however (eg [l:4]
            start = idx.start or 0
            if (start >= 0) and (idx.stop is None) and (idx.step is None or idx.step == 1):
                no_copy_needed=True
            else:
                length = len(self)  # Need to calc length.
                start, stop, step = idx.indices(length)
                no_copy_needed = (stop == length) and (step == 1)

            if no_copy_needed:
                l = self
                for i in range(start): 
                    if not l: break # End of list.
                    l=l.tail
                return l
            else:
                # We need to construct a new list.
                if step < 1:  # Need to instantiate list to deal with -ve step
                    return LinkedList(list(self)[start:stop:step])
                else:
                    return LinkedList(itertools.islice(iter(self), start, stop, step))
        else:       
            # Non-slice index.
            if idx < 0: idx = len(self)+idx
            if not self: raise IndexError("list index out of range")
            if idx == 0: return self.head
            return self.tail[idx-1]

    def __mul__(self, n):
        if n <= 0: return Nil
        l=self
        for i in range(n-1): l += self
        return l
    def __rmul__(self, n): return self * n

    # Ideally we should compute the has ourselves rather than construct
    # a temporary tuple as below.  I haven't impemented this here
    def __hash__(self): return hash(tuple(self))

    def __eq__(self, other): return self._cmp(other) == 0
    def __ne__(self, other): return not self == other
    def __lt__(self, other): return self._cmp(other) < 0
    def __gt__(self, other): return self._cmp(other) > 0
    def __le__(self, other): return self._cmp(other) <= 0
    def __ge__(self, other): return self._cmp(other) >= 0

    def _cmp(self, other):
        """Acts as cmp(): -1 for self<other, 0 for equal, 1 for greater"""
        if not isinstance(other, LinkedList):
            return cmp(LinkedList,type(other))  # Arbitrary ordering.

        A, B = iter(self), iter(other)
        for a,b in itertools.izip(A,B):
           if a<b: return -1
           elif a > b: return 1

        try:
            A.next()
            return 1  # a has more items.
        except StopIteration: pass

        try:
            B.next()
            return -1  # b has more items.
        except StopIteration: pass

        return 0  # Lists are equal

    def __repr__(self):
        return "LinkedList([%s])" % ', '.join(map(repr,self))

class EmptyList(LinkedList):
    """A singleton representing an empty list."""
    def __new__(cls):
        return object.__new__(cls)

    def __iter__(self): return iter([])
    def __nonzero__(self): return False

    @property
    def head(self): raise IndexError("End of list")

    @property
    def tail(self): raise IndexError("End of list")

# Create EmptyList singleton
LinkedList.EmptyList = EmptyList()
del EmptyList
2
  • I guess it's not so surprising, but this 8 year old (!) example does not work with python 3 :) Mar 14, 2017 at 7:18
  • 1
    Please provide explanation for new and a just a bit of overall explanation.
    – anukalp
    Aug 8, 2017 at 2:02
8

llist — Linked list datatypes for Python

llist module implements linked list data structures. It supports a doubly linked list, i.e. dllist and a singly linked data structure sllist.

dllist objects

This object represents a doubly linked list data structure.

first

First dllistnode object in the list. None if list is empty.

last

Last dllistnode object in the list. None if list is empty.

dllist objects also support the following methods:

append(x)

Add x to the right side of the list and return inserted dllistnode.

appendleft(x)

Add x to the left side of the list and return inserted dllistnode.

appendright(x)

Add x to the right side of the list and return inserted dllistnode.

clear()

Remove all nodes from the list.

extend(iterable)

Append elements from iterable to the right side of the list.

extendleft(iterable)

Append elements from iterable to the left side of the list.

extendright(iterable)

Append elements from iterable to the right side of the list.

insert(x[, before])

Add x to the right side of the list if before is not specified, or insert x to the left side of dllistnode before. Return inserted dllistnode.

nodeat(index)

Return node (of type dllistnode) at index.

pop()

Remove and return an element’s value from the right side of the list.

popleft()

Remove and return an element’s value from the left side of the list.

popright()

Remove and return an element’s value from the right side of the list

remove(node)

Remove node from the list and return the element which was stored in it.

dllistnode objects

class llist.dllistnode([value])

Return a new doubly linked list node, initialized (optionally) with value.

dllistnode objects provide the following attributes:

next

Next node in the list. This attribute is read-only.

prev

Previous node in the list. This attribute is read-only.

value

Value stored in this node. Compiled from this reference

sllist

class llist.sllist([iterable]) Return a new singly linked list initialized with elements from iterable. If iterable is not specified, the new sllist is empty.

A similar set of attributes and operations are defined for this sllist object. See this reference for more information.

1
  • Is there a source for this? Does it work for python3?
    – iggy12345
    May 16, 2019 at 20:32
4
class Node(object):
    def __init__(self, data=None, next=None):
        self.data = data
        self.next = next

    def setData(self, data):
        self.data = data
        return self.data

    def setNext(self, next):
        self.next = next

    def getNext(self):
        return self.next

    def hasNext(self):
        return self.next != None


class singleLinkList(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.head = None

    def isEmpty(self):
        return self.head == None

    def insertAtBeginning(self, data):
        newNode = Node()
        newNode.setData(data)

        if self.listLength() == 0:
            self.head = newNode
        else:
            newNode.setNext(self.head)
            self.head = newNode

    def insertAtEnd(self, data):
        newNode = Node()
        newNode.setData(data)

        current = self.head

        while current.getNext() != None:
            current = current.getNext()

        current.setNext(newNode)

    def listLength(self):
        current = self.head
        count = 0

        while current != None:
            count += 1
            current = current.getNext()
        return count

    def print_llist(self):
        current = self.head
        print("List Start.")
        while current != None:
            print(current.getData())
            current = current.getNext()

        print("List End.")



if __name__ == '__main__':
    ll = singleLinkList()
    ll.insertAtBeginning(55)
    ll.insertAtEnd(56)
    ll.print_llist()
    print(ll.listLength())
2

I based this additional function on Nick Stinemates

def add_node_at_end(self, data):
    new_node = Node()
    node = self.curr_node
    while node:
        if node.next == None:
            node.next = new_node
            new_node.next = None
            new_node.data = data
        node = node.next

The method he has adds the new node at the beginning while I have seen a lot of implementations which usually add a new node at the end but whatever, it is fun to do.

2

The following is what I came up with. It's similer to Riccardo C.'s, in this thread, except it prints the numbers in order instead of in reverse. I also made the LinkedList object a Python Iterator in order to print the list out like you would a normal Python list.

class Node:

    def __init__(self, data=None):
        self.data = data
        self.next = None

    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.data)


class LinkedList:

    def __init__(self):
        self.head = None
        self.curr = None
        self.tail = None

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        if self.head and not self.curr:
            self.curr = self.head
            return self.curr
        elif self.curr.next:
            self.curr = self.curr.next
            return self.curr
        else:
            raise StopIteration

    def append(self, data):
        n = Node(data)
        if not self.head:
            self.head = n
            self.tail = n
        else:
            self.tail.next = n
            self.tail = self.tail.next


# Add 5 nodes
ll = LinkedList()
for i in range(1, 6):
    ll.append(i)

# print out the list
for n in ll:
    print n

"""
Example output:
$ python linked_list.py
1
2
3
4
5
"""
1
  • It looks like there's a bug before raise StopIteration. If you're going to preserve the current node as an internal piece of state, you need to reset it before you stop iterating so that the next time the linked list is looped over, it will enter your first clause.
    – Tim Wilder
    Apr 30, 2014 at 3:25
2

I just did this as a fun toy. It should be immutable as long as you don't touch the underscore-prefixed methods, and it implements a bunch of Python magic like indexing and len.

2

Here is my solution:

Implementation

class Node:
  def __init__(self, initdata):
    self.data = initdata
    self.next = None

  def get_data(self):
    return self.data

  def set_data(self, data):
    self.data = data

  def get_next(self):
    return self.next

  def set_next(self, node):
    self.next = node


# ------------------------ Link List class ------------------------------- #
class LinkList:

  def __init__(self):
    self.head = None

  def is_empty(self):
    return self.head == None

  def traversal(self, data=None):
    node = self.head
    index = 0
    found = False
    while node is not None and not found:
      if node.get_data() == data:
        found = True
      else:
        node = node.get_next()
        index += 1
    return (node, index)

  def size(self):
    _, count = self.traversal(None)
    return count

  def search(self, data):
    node, _ = self.traversal(data)
    return node

  def add(self, data):
    node = Node(data)
    node.set_next(self.head)
    self.head = node

  def remove(self, data):
    previous_node = None
    current_node = self.head
    found = False
    while current_node is not None and not found:
      if current_node.get_data() == data:
        found = True
        if previous_node:
          previous_node.set_next(current_node.get_next())
        else:
          self.head = current_node
      else:
        previous_node = current_node
        current_node = current_node.get_next()
    return found

Usage

link_list = LinkList()
link_list.add(10)
link_list.add(20)
link_list.add(30)
link_list.add(40)
link_list.add(50)
link_list.size()
link_list.search(30)
link_list.remove(20)

Original Implementation Idea

http://interactivepython.org/runestone/static/pythonds/BasicDS/ImplementinganUnorderedListLinkedLists.html

1

When using immutable linked lists, consider using Python's tuple directly.

ls = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

def first(ls): return ls[0]
def rest(ls): return ls[1:]

Its really that ease, and you get to keep the additional funcitons like len(ls), x in ls, etc.

3
  • Tuples don't have the performance characteristics he asked for. Your rest() is O(n) as opposed to O(1) for a linked list, as is consing a new head.
    – Brian
    Nov 11, 2008 at 13:10
  • Right. My point is: Do not ask for linked lists to implement your algorithm, rather use the python features to optimally implement it. E.g. iterating over a linked list is O(n), as is iterating over a python tuple using "for x in t:"
    – Ber
    Nov 11, 2008 at 19:29
  • i think the right way to use tuples to implement linked lists is the accepted answer here. your way uses immutable array-like-objects
    – Claudiu
    Nov 11, 2008 at 21:56
1
class LL(object):
    def __init__(self,val):
        self.val = val
        self.next = None

    def pushNodeEnd(self,top,val):
        if top is None:
            top.val=val
            top.next=None
        else:
            tmp=top
            while (tmp.next != None):
                tmp=tmp.next        
            newNode=LL(val)
            newNode.next=None
            tmp.next=newNode

    def pushNodeFront(self,top,val):
        if top is None:
            top.val=val
            top.next=None
        else:
            newNode=LL(val)
            newNode.next=top
            top=newNode

    def popNodeFront(self,top):
        if top is None:
            return
        else:
            sav=top
            top=top.next
        return sav

    def popNodeEnd(self,top):
        if top is None:
            return
        else:
            tmp=top
            while (tmp.next != None):
                prev=tmp
                tmp=tmp.next
            prev.next=None
        return tmp

top=LL(10)
top.pushNodeEnd(top, 20)
top.pushNodeEnd(top, 30)
pop=top.popNodeEnd(top)
print (pop.val)
1

I've put a Python 2.x and 3.x singly-linked list class at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/linked_list_mod/

It's tested with CPython 2.7, CPython 3.4, Pypy 2.3.1, Pypy3 2.3.1, and Jython 2.7b2, and comes with a nice automated test suite.

It also includes LIFO and FIFO classes.

They aren't immutable though.

1
class LinkedStack:
'''LIFO Stack implementation using a singly linked list for storage.'''

_ToList = []

#---------- nested _Node class -----------------------------
class _Node:
    '''Lightweight, nonpublic class for storing a singly linked node.'''
    __slots__ = '_element', '_next'     #streamline memory usage

    def __init__(self, element, next):
        self._element = element
        self._next = next

#--------------- stack methods ---------------------------------
def __init__(self):
    '''Create an empty stack.'''
    self._head = None
    self._size = 0

def __len__(self):
    '''Return the number of elements in the stack.'''
    return self._size

def IsEmpty(self):
    '''Return True if the stack is empty'''
    return  self._size == 0

def Push(self,e):
    '''Add element e to the top of the Stack.'''
    self._head = self._Node(e, self._head)      #create and link a new node
    self._size +=1
    self._ToList.append(e)

def Top(self):
    '''Return (but do not remove) the element at the top of the stack.
       Raise exception if the stack is empty
    '''

    if self.IsEmpty():
        raise Exception('Stack is empty')
    return  self._head._element             #top of stack is at head of list

def Pop(self):
    '''Remove and return the element from the top of the stack (i.e. LIFO).
       Raise exception if the stack is empty
    '''
    if self.IsEmpty():
        raise Exception('Stack is empty')
    answer = self._head._element
    self._head = self._head._next       #bypass the former top node
    self._size -=1
    self._ToList.remove(answer)
    return answer

def Count(self):
    '''Return how many nodes the stack has'''
    return self.__len__()

def Clear(self):
    '''Delete all nodes'''
    for i in range(self.Count()):
        self.Pop()

def ToList(self):
    return self._ToList
1

Linked List Class

class LinkedStack:
# Nested Node Class
class Node:
    def __init__(self, element, next):
        self.__element = element
        self.__next = next

    def get_next(self):
        return self.__next

    def get_element(self):
        return self.__element

def __init__(self):
    self.head = None
    self.size = 0
    self.data = []

def __len__(self):
    return self.size

def __str__(self):
    return str(self.data)

def is_empty(self):
    return self.size == 0

def push(self, e):
    newest = self.Node(e, self.head)
    self.head = newest
    self.size += 1
    self.data.append(newest)

def top(self):
    if self.is_empty():
        raise Empty('Stack is empty')
    return self.head.__element

def pop(self):
    if self.is_empty():
        raise Empty('Stack is empty')
    answer = self.head.element
    self.head = self.head.next
    self.size -= 1
    return answer

Usage

from LinkedStack import LinkedStack

x = LinkedStack()

x.push(10)
x.push(25)
x.push(55)


for i in range(x.size - 1, -1, -1):

    print '|', x.data[i].get_element(), '|' ,
    #next object

    if x.data[i].get_next() == None:
        print '--> None'
    else:
        print  x.data[i].get_next().get_element(), '-|---->  ',

Output

| 55 | 25 -|---->   | 25 | 10 -|---->   | 10 | --> None
1

Here is my simple implementation:

class Node:
    def __init__(self):
        self.data = None
        self.next = None
    def __str__(self):
        return "Data %s: Next -> %s"%(self.data, self.next)

class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self):
        self.head = Node()
        self.curNode = self.head
    def insertNode(self, data):
        node = Node()
        node.data = data
        node.next = None
        if self.head.data == None:
            self.head = node
            self.curNode = node
        else:
            self.curNode.next = node
            self.curNode = node
    def printList(self):
        print self.head

l = LinkedList()
l.insertNode(1)
l.insertNode(2)
l.insertNode(34)

Output:

Data 1: Next -> Data 2: Next -> Data 34: Next -> Data 4: Next -> None
0

I think the implementation below fill the bill quite gracefully.

'''singly linked lists, by Yingjie Lan, December 1st, 2011'''

class linkst:
    '''Singly linked list, with pythonic features.
The list has pointers to both the first and the last node.'''
    __slots__ = ['data', 'next'] #memory efficient
    def __init__(self, iterable=(), data=None, next=None):
        '''Provide an iterable to make a singly linked list.
Set iterable to None to make a data node for internal use.'''
        if iterable is not None: 
            self.data, self.next = self, None
            self.extend(iterable)
        else: #a common node
            self.data, self.next = data, next

    def empty(self):
        '''test if the list is empty'''
        return self.next is None

    def append(self, data):
        '''append to the end of list.'''
        last = self.data
        self.data = last.next = linkst(None, data)
        #self.data = last.next

    def insert(self, data, index=0):
        '''insert data before index.
Raise IndexError if index is out of range'''
        curr, cat = self, 0
        while cat < index and curr:
            curr, cat = curr.next, cat+1
        if index<0 or not curr:
            raise IndexError(index)
        new = linkst(None, data, curr.next)
        if curr.next is None: self.data = new
        curr.next = new

    def reverse(self):
        '''reverse the order of list in place'''
        current, prev = self.next, None
        while current: #what if list is empty?
            next = current.next
            current.next = prev
            prev, current = current, next
        if self.next: self.data = self.next
        self.next = prev

    def delete(self, index=0):
        '''remvoe the item at index from the list'''
        curr, cat = self, 0
        while cat < index and curr.next:
            curr, cat = curr.next, cat+1
        if index<0 or not curr.next:
            raise IndexError(index)
        curr.next = curr.next.next
        if curr.next is None: #tail
            self.data = curr #current == self?

    def remove(self, data):
        '''remove first occurrence of data.
Raises ValueError if the data is not present.'''
        current = self
        while current.next: #node to be examined
            if data == current.next.data: break
            current = current.next #move on
        else: raise ValueError(data)
        current.next = current.next.next
        if current.next is None: #tail
            self.data = current #current == self?

    def __contains__(self, data):
        '''membership test using keyword 'in'.'''
        current = self.next
        while current:
            if data == current.data:
                return True
            current = current.next
        return False

    def __iter__(self):
        '''iterate through list by for-statements.
return an iterator that must define the __next__ method.'''
        itr = linkst()
        itr.next = self.next
        return itr #invariance: itr.data == itr

    def __next__(self):
        '''the for-statement depends on this method
to provide items one by one in the list.
return the next data, and move on.'''
        #the invariance is checked so that a linked list
        #will not be mistakenly iterated over
        if self.data is not self or self.next is None:
            raise StopIteration()
        next = self.next
        self.next = next.next
        return next.data

    def __repr__(self):
        '''string representation of the list'''
        return 'linkst(%r)'%list(self)

    def __str__(self):
        '''converting the list to a string'''
        return '->'.join(str(i) for i in self)

    #note: this is NOT the class lab! see file linked.py.
    def extend(self, iterable):
        '''takes an iterable, and append all items in the iterable
to the end of the list self.'''
        last = self.data
        for i in iterable:
            last.next = linkst(None, i)
            last = last.next
        self.data = last

    def index(self, data):
        '''TODO: return first index of data in the list self.
    Raises ValueError if the value is not present.'''
        #must not convert self to a tuple or any other containers
        current, idx = self.next, 0
        while current:
            if current.data == data: return idx
            current, idx = current.next, idx+1
        raise ValueError(data)
0
class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
        self.next = None

    def insert(self, node):
        if not self.next:
            self.next = node
        else:
            self.next.insert(node)

    def __str__(self):
        if self.next:
            return '%s -> %s' % (self.value, str(self.next))
        else:
            return ' %s ' % self.value

if __name__ == "__main__":
    items = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']    
    ll = None
    for item in items:
        if ll:
            next_ll = LinkedList(item)
            ll.insert(next_ll)
        else:
            ll = LinkedList(item)
    print('[ %s ]' % ll)
0

First of all, I assume you want linked lists. In practice, you can use collections.deque, whose current CPython implementation is a doubly linked list of blocks (each block contains an array of 62 cargo objects). It subsumes linked list's functionality. You can also search for a C extension called llist on pypi. If you want a pure-Python and easy-to-follow implementation of the linked list ADT, you can take a look at my following minimal implementation.

class Node (object):
    """ Node for a linked list. """
    def __init__ (self, value, next=None):
        self.value = value
        self.next = next

class LinkedList (object):
    """ Linked list ADT implementation using class. 
        A linked list is a wrapper of a head pointer
        that references either None, or a node that contains 
        a reference to a linked list.
    """
    def __init__ (self, iterable=()):
        self.head = None
        for x in iterable:
            self.head = Node(x, self.head)

    def __iter__ (self):
        p = self.head
        while p is not None:
            yield p.value
            p = p.next

    def prepend (self, x):  # 'appendleft'
        self.head = Node(x, self.head)

    def reverse (self):
        """ In-place reversal. """
        p = self.head
        self.head = None
        while p is not None:
            p0, p = p, p.next
            p0.next = self.head
            self.head = p0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    ll = LinkedList([6,5,4])
    ll.prepend(3); ll.prepend(2)
    print list(ll)
    ll.reverse()
    print list(ll)
0

Sample of a doubly linked list (save as linkedlist.py):

class node:
    def __init__(self, before=None, cargo=None, next=None): 
        self._previous = before
        self._cargo = cargo 
        self._next  = next 

    def __str__(self):
        return str(self._cargo) or None 

class linkedList:
    def __init__(self): 
        self._head = None 
        self._length = 0

    def add(self, cargo):
        n = node(None, cargo, self._head)
        if self._head:
            self._head._previous = n
        self._head = n
        self._length += 1

    def search(self,cargo):
        node = self._head
        while (node and node._cargo != cargo):
            node = node._next
        return node

    def delete(self,cargo):
        node = self.search(cargo)
        if node:
            prev = node._previous
            nx = node._next
            if prev:
                prev._next = node._next
            else:
                self._head = nx
                nx._previous = None
            if nx:
                nx._previous = prev 
            else:
                prev._next = None
        self._length -= 1

    def __str__(self):
        print 'Size of linked list: ',self._length
        node = self._head
        while node:
            print node
            node = node._next

Testing (save as test.py):

from linkedlist import node, linkedList

def test():

    print 'Testing Linked List'

    l = linkedList()

    l.add(10)
    l.add(20)
    l.add(30)
    l.add(40)
    l.add(50)
    l.add(60)

    print 'Linked List after insert nodes:'
    l.__str__()

    print 'Search some value, 30:'
    node = l.search(30)
    print node

    print 'Delete some value, 30:'
    node = l.delete(30)
    l.__str__()

    print 'Delete first element, 60:'
    node = l.delete(60)
    l.__str__()

    print 'Delete last element, 10:'
    node = l.delete(10)
    l.__str__()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    test()

Output:

Testing Linked List
Linked List after insert nodes:
Size of linked list:  6
60
50
40
30
20
10
Search some value, 30:
30
Delete some value, 30:
Size of linked list:  5
60
50
40
20
10
Delete first element, 60:
Size of linked list:  4
50
40
20
10
Delete last element, 10:
Size of linked list:  3
50
40
20
0

I did also write a Single Linked List based on some tutorial, which has the basic two Node and Linked List classes, and some additional methods for insertion, delete, reverse, sorting, and such.

It's not the best or easiest, works OK though.

"""
🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏

Single Linked List (SLL):
A simple object-oriented implementation of Single Linked List (SLL) 
with some associated methods, such as create list, count nodes, delete nodes, and such. 

🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏🍎🍏
"""

class Node:
    """
    Instantiates a node
    """
    def __init__(self, value):
        """
        Node class constructor which sets the value and link of the node

        """
        self.info = value
        self.link = None

class SingleLinkedList:
    """
    Instantiates the SLL class
    """
    def __init__(self):
        """
        SLL class constructor which sets the value and link of the node

        """
        self.start = None

    def create_single_linked_list(self):
        """
        Reads values from stdin and appends them to this list and creates a SLL with integer nodes

        """
        try:
            number_of_nodes = int(input("👉   Enter a positive integer between 1-50 for the number of nodes you wish to have in the list: "))
            if number_of_nodes <= 0 or number_of_nodes > 51:
                print("💛 The number of nodes though must be an integer between 1 to 50!")
                self.create_single_linked_list()

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)
            self.create_single_linked_list()


        try:
            for _ in range(number_of_nodes):
                try:
                    data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer for the node to be inserted: "))
                    self.insert_node_at_end(data)
                except Exception as e:
                    print("💛 Error: ", e)
        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def count_sll_nodes(self):
        """
        Counts the nodes of the linked list

        """
        try:
            p = self.start
            n = 0
            while p is not None:
                n += 1
                p = p.link

            if n >= 1:
                print(f"💚 The number of nodes in the linked list is {n}")
            else:
                print(f"💛 The SLL does not have a node!")
        except Exception as e: 
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def search_sll_nodes(self, x):
        """
        Searches the x integer in the linked list
        """
        try:
            position =  1
            p = self.start
            while p is not None:
                if p.info == x:
                    print(f"💚 YAAAY! We found {x} at position {position}")
                    return True

                #Increment the position
                position += 1 
                #Assign the next node to the current node
                p = p.link
            else:
                print(f"💔 Sorry! We couldn't find {x} at any position. Maybe, you might want to use option 9 and try again later!")
                return False
        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def display_sll(self):
        """
        Displays the list
        """
        try:
            if self.start is None:
                print("💛 Single linked list is empty!")
                return

            display_sll = "💚 Single linked list nodes are: "
            p = self.start
            while p is not None:
                display_sll += str(p.info) + "\t"
                p = p.link

            print(display_sll)

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e) 

    def insert_node_in_beginning(self, data):
        """
        Inserts an integer in the beginning of the linked list

        """
        try:
            temp = Node(data)
            temp.link = self.start
            self.start = temp
        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def insert_node_at_end(self, data):
        """
        Inserts an integer at the end of the linked list

        """
        try:            
            temp = Node(data)
            if self.start is None:
                self.start = temp
                return

            p = self.start  
            while p.link is not None:
                p = p.link
            p.link = temp
        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def insert_node_after_another(self, data, x):
        """
        Inserts an integer after the x node

        """
        try:
            p = self.start

            while p is not None:
                if p.info == x:
                    break
                p = p.link

            if p is None:
                print(f"💔 Sorry! {x} is not in the list.")
            else:
                temp = Node(data)
                temp.link = p.link
                p.link = temp
        except Exception as e: 
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def insert_node_before_another(self, data, x):
        """
        Inserts an integer before the x node

        """

        try:

            # If list is empty
            if self.start is None:
                print("💔 Sorry! The list is empty.")
                return 
            # If x is the first node, and new node should be inserted before the first node
            if x == self.start.info:
                temp = Node(data)
                temp.link = p.link
                p.link = temp

            # Finding the reference to the prior node containing x
            p = self.start
            while p.link is not None:
                if p.link.info == x:
                    break
                p = p.link

            if p.link is not None:
                print(f"💔 Sorry! {x} is not in the list.")
            else:
                temp = Node(data)
                temp.link = p.link
                p.link = temp           

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def insert_node_at_position(self, data, k):
        """
        Inserts an integer in k position of the linked list

        """
        try:
            # if we wish to insert at the first node
            if k == 1:
                temp = Node(data)
                temp.link = self.start
                self.start = temp
                return

            p = self.start
            i = 1

            while i < k-1 and p is not None:
                p = p.link
                i += 1

            if p is None:
                print(f"💛 The max position is {i}") 
            else:    
                temp = Node(data)
                temp.link = self.start
                self.start = temp

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def delete_a_node(self, x):
        """
        Deletes a node of a linked list

        """
        try:
            # If list is empty
            if self.start is None:
                print("💔 Sorry! The list is empty.")
                return

            # If there is only one node
            if self.start.info == x:
                self.start = self.start.link

            # If more than one node exists
            p = self.start
            while p.link is not None:
                if p.link.info == x:
                    break   
                p = p.link

            if p.link is None:
                print(f"💔 Sorry! {x} is not in the list.")
            else:
                p.link = p.link.link

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)

    def delete_sll_first_node(self):
        """
        Deletes the first node of a linked list

        """
        try:
            if self.start is None:
                return
            self.start = self.start.link

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def delete_sll_last_node(self):
        """
        Deletes the last node of a linked list

        """
        try:

            # If the list is empty
            if self.start is None:
                return

            # If there is only one node
            if self.start.link is None:
                self.start = None
                return

            # If there is more than one node    
            p = self.start

            # Increment until we find the node prior to the last node 
            while p.link.link is not None:
                p = p.link

            p.link = None   

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def reverse_sll(self):
        """
        Reverses the linked list

        """

        try:

            prev = None
            p = self.start
            while p is not None:
                next = p.link
                p.link = prev
                prev = p
                p = next
            self.start = prev

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def bubble_sort_sll_nodes_data(self):
        """
        Bubble sorts the linked list on integer values

        """

        try:

            # If the list is empty or there is only one node
            if self.start is None or self.start.link is None:
                print("💛 The list has no or only one node and sorting is not required.")
            end = None

            while end != self.start.link:
                p = self.start
                while p.link != end:
                    q = p.link
                    if p.info > q.info:
                        p.info, q.info = q.info, p.info
                    p = p.link
                end = p

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def bubble_sort_sll(self):
        """
        Bubble sorts the linked list

        """

        try:

            # If the list is empty or there is only one node
            if self.start is None or self.start.link is None:
                print("💛 The list has no or only one node and sorting is not required.")
            end = None

            while end != self.start.link:
                r = p = self.start
                while p.link != end:
                    q = p.link
                    if p.info > q.info:
                        p.link = q.link
                        q.link = p
                    if  p != self.start:
                        r.link = q.link
                    else:
                        self.start = q
                    p, q = q, p
                    r = p
                    p = p.link
                end = p

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def sll_has_cycle(self):
        """
        Tests the list for cycles using Tortoise and Hare Algorithm (Floyd's cycle detection algorithm)
        """

        try:

            if self.find_sll_cycle() is None:
                return False
            else:
                return True


        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def find_sll_cycle(self):
        """
        Finds cycles in the list, if any
        """

        try:

            # If there is one node or none, there is no cycle
            if self.start is None or self.start.link is None:
                return None

            # Otherwise, 
            slowR = self.start
            fastR = self.start

            while slowR is not None and fastR is not None:
                slowR = slowR.link
                fastR = fastR.link.link
                if slowR == fastR: 
                    return slowR

            return None

        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def remove_cycle_from_sll(self):
        """
        Removes the cycles
        """

        try:

            c = self.find_sll_cycle()

            # If there is no cycle
            if c is None:
                return

            print(f"💛 There is a cycle at node: ", c.info)

            p = c
            q = c
            len_cycles = 0
            while True:
                len_cycles += 1
                q = q.link

                if p == q:
                    break

            print(f"💛 The cycle length is {len_cycles}")

            len_rem_list = 0
            p = self.start

            while p != q:
                len_rem_list += 1
                p = p.link
                q = q.link

            print(f"💛 The number of nodes not included in the cycle is {len_rem_list}")

            length_list = len_rem_list + len_cycles

            print(f"💛 The SLL length is {length_list}")

            # This for loop goes to the end of the SLL, and set the last node to None and the cycle is removed. 
            p = self.start
            for _ in range(length_list-1):
                p = p.link
            p.link = None


        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def insert_cycle_in_sll(self, x):
        """
        Inserts a cycle at a node that contains x

        """

        try:

            if self.start is None:
                return False

            p = self.start
            px = None
            prev = None


            while p is not None:
                if p.info == x:
                    px = p
                prev = p
                p = p.link

            if px is not None:
                prev.link = px
            else:
                print(f"💔 Sorry! {x} is not in the list.")


        except Exception as e:
            print("💛 Error: ", e)


    def merge_using_new_list(self, list2):
        """
        Merges two already sorted SLLs by creating new lists
        """
        merge_list = SingleLinkedList()
        merge_list.start = self._merge_using_new_list(self.start, list2.start)
        return merge_list

    def _merge_using_new_list(self, p1, p2):
        """
        Private method of merge_using_new_list
        """
        if p1.info <= p2.info:
            Start_merge = Node(p1.info)
            p1 = p1.link
        else:
            Start_merge = Node(p2.info)
            p2 = p2.link            
        pM = Start_merge

        while p1 is not None and p2 is not None:
            if p1.info <= p2.info:
                pM.link = Node(p1.info)
                p1 = p1.link
            else:
                pM.link = Node(p2.info)
                p2 = p2.link
            pM = pM.link

        #If the second list is finished, yet the first list has some nodes
        while p1 is not None:
            pM.link = Node(p1.info)
            p1 = p1.link
            pM = pM.link

        #If the second list is finished, yet the first list has some nodes
        while p2 is not None:
            pM.link = Node(p2.info)
            p2 = p2.link
            pM = pM.link

        return Start_merge

    def merge_inplace(self, list2):
        """
        Merges two already sorted SLLs in place in O(1) of space
        """
        merge_list = SingleLinkedList()
        merge_list.start = self._merge_inplace(self.start, list2.start)
        return merge_list

    def _merge_inplace(self, p1, p2):
        """
        Merges two already sorted SLLs in place in O(1) of space
        """
        if p1.info <= p2.info:
            Start_merge = p1
            p1 = p1.link
        else:
            Start_merge = p2
            p2 = p2.link
        pM = Start_merge

        while p1 is not None and p2 is not None:
            if p1.info <= p2.info:
                pM.link = p1
                pM = pM.link
                p1 = p1.link
            else:
                pM.link = p2
                pM = pM.link
                p2 = p2.link

        if p1 is None:
            pM.link = p2
        else:
            pM.link = p1

        return Start_merge

    def merge_sort_sll(self):
        """
        Sorts the linked list using merge sort algorithm
        """
        self.start = self._merge_sort_recursive(self.start)


    def _merge_sort_recursive(self, list_start):
        """
        Recursively calls the merge sort algorithm for two divided lists
        """

        # If the list is empty or has only one node
        if list_start is None or list_start.link is None:
            return list_start

        # If the list has two nodes or more
        start_one = list_start
        start_two = self._divide_list(self_start)
        start_one = self._merge_sort_recursive(start_one)
        start_two = self._merge_sort_recursive(start_two)
        start_merge = self._merge_inplace(start_one, start_two)

        return start_merge

    def _divide_list(self, p):
        """
        Divides the linked list into two almost equally sized lists
        """

        # Refers to the third nodes of the list
        q = p.link.link

        while q is not None and p is not None:
            # Increments p one node at the time
            p = p.link
            # Increments q two nodes at the time
            q = q.link.link

        start_two = p.link
        p.link = None

        return start_two

    def concat_second_list_to_sll(self, list2):
        """
        Concatenates another SLL to an existing SLL
        """

        # If the second SLL has no node
        if list2.start is None:
            return

        # If the original SLL has no node
        if self.start is None:
            self.start = list2.start
            return

        # Otherwise traverse the original SLL
        p = self.start
        while p.link is not None:
            p = p.link

        # Link the last node to the first node of the second SLL
        p.link = list2.start



    def test_merge_using_new_list_and_inplace(self):
        """

        """

        LIST_ONE = SingleLinkedList()
        LIST_TWO = SingleLinkedList()

        LIST_ONE.create_single_linked_list()
        LIST_TWO.create_single_linked_list()

        print("1️⃣  The unsorted first list is: ")
        LIST_ONE.display_sll()

        print("2️⃣  The unsorted second list is: ")
        LIST_TWO.display_sll()


        LIST_ONE.bubble_sort_sll_nodes_data()
        LIST_TWO.bubble_sort_sll_nodes_data()

        print("1️⃣  The sorted first list is: ")
        LIST_ONE.display_sll()

        print("2️⃣  The sorted second list is: ")
        LIST_TWO.display_sll()

        LIST_THREE = LIST_ONE.merge_using_new_list(LIST_TWO)

        print("The merged list by creating a new list is: ")
        LIST_THREE.display_sll()


        LIST_FOUR = LIST_ONE.merge_inplace(LIST_TWO)

        print("The in-place merged list is: ")
        LIST_FOUR.display_sll()     


    def test_all_methods(self):
        """
        Tests all methods of the SLL class
        """

        OPTIONS_HELP = """
📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗
    Select a method from 1-19:                                                          
🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒🍒
        ℹ️   (1)    👉  Create a single liked list (SLL).
        ℹ️   (2)    👉  Display the SLL.                            
        ℹ️   (3)    👉  Count the nodes of SLL. 
        ℹ️   (4)    👉  Search the SLL.
        ℹ️   (5)    👉  Insert a node at the beginning of the SLL.
        ℹ️   (6)    👉  Insert a node at the end of the SLL.
        ℹ️   (7)    👉  Insert a node after a specified node of the SLL.
        ℹ️   (8)    👉  Insert a node before a specified node of the SLL.
        ℹ️   (9)    👉  Delete the first node of SLL.
        ℹ️   (10)   👉  Delete the last node of the SLL.
        ℹ️   (11)   👉  Delete a node you wish to remove.                           
        ℹ️   (12)   👉  Reverse the SLL.
        ℹ️   (13)   👉  Bubble sort the SLL by only exchanging the integer values.  
        ℹ️   (14)   👉  Bubble sort the SLL by exchanging links.                    
        ℹ️   (15)   👉  Merge sort the SLL.
        ℹ️   (16)   👉  Insert a cycle in the SLL.
        ℹ️   (17)   👉  Detect if the SLL has a cycle.
        ℹ️   (18)   👉  Remove cycle in the SLL.
        ℹ️   (19)   👉  Test merging two bubble-sorted SLLs.
        ℹ️   (20)   👉  Concatenate a second list to the SLL. 
        ℹ️   (21)   👉  Exit.
📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗📗
        """


        self.create_single_linked_list()

        while True:

            print(OPTIONS_HELP)

            UI_OPTION = int(input("👉   Enter an integer for the method you wish to run using the above help: "))

            if UI_OPTION == 1:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted at the end of the list: "))
                x = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted after that: "))
                self.insert_node_after_another(data, x)
            elif UI_OPTION == 2:
                self.display_sll()
            elif UI_OPTION == 3:
                self.count_sll_nodes()
            elif UI_OPTION == 4:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be searched: "))
                self.search_sll_nodes(data)
            elif UI_OPTION == 5:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted at the beginning: "))
                self.insert_node_in_beginning(data)
            elif UI_OPTION == 6:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted at the end: "))
                self.insert_node_at_end(data)
            elif UI_OPTION == 7:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted: "))
                x = int(input("👉   Enter an integer to be inserted before that: "))
                self.insert_node_before_another(data, x)
            elif UI_OPTION == 8:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer for the node to be inserted: "))
                k = int(input("👉   Enter an integer for the position at which you wish to insert the node: "))
                self.insert_node_before_another(data, k)
            elif UI_OPTION == 9:
                self.delete_sll_first_node()
            elif UI_OPTION == 10:
                self.delete_sll_last_node()
            elif UI_OPTION == 11:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer for the node you wish to remove: "))
                self.delete_a_node(data)
            elif UI_OPTION == 12:
                self.reverse_sll()
            elif UI_OPTION == 13:
                self.bubble_sort_sll_nodes_data()
            elif UI_OPTION == 14:
                self.bubble_sort_sll()
            elif UI_OPTION == 15:
                self.merge_sort_sll()
            elif UI_OPTION == 16:
                data = int(input("👉   Enter an integer at which a cycle has to be formed: "))
                self.insert_cycle_in_sll(data)
            elif UI_OPTION == 17:
                if self.sll_has_cycle():
                    print("💛 The linked list has a cycle. ")
                else:
                    print("💚 YAAAY! The linked list does not have a cycle. ")
            elif UI_OPTION == 18:
                self.remove_cycle_from_sll()
            elif UI_OPTION == 19:
                self.test_merge_using_new_list_and_inplace()
            elif UI_OPTION == 20:
                list2 = self.create_single_linked_list()
                self.concat_second_list_to_sll(list2)
            elif UI_OPTION == 21:
                break
            else:
                print("💛 Option must be an integer, between 1 to 21.")

            print()     



if __name__ == '__main__':
    # Instantiates a new SLL object
    SLL_OBJECT = SingleLinkedList()
    SLL_OBJECT.test_all_methods()
0

Expanding Nick Stinemates's answer

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.data = None
        self.next = None

class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self):
        self.head = None

    def prepend_node(self, data):
        new_node = Node()
        new_node.data = data
        new_node.next = self.head
        self.head = new_node

    def append_node(self, data):
        new_node = Node()
        new_node.data = data
        current = self.head
        while current.next:
            current = current.next
        current.next = new_node

    def reverse(self):
        """ In-place reversal, modifies exiting list"""
        previous = None
        current_node = self.head

        while current_node:
            temp =  current_node.next
            current_node.next = previous
            previous = current_node
            current_node = temp
        self.head = previous

    def search(self, data):
        current_node = self.head
        try:
            while current_node.data != data:
                current_node = current_node.next
            return True
        except:
            return False

    def display(self):
        if self.head is None:
            print("Linked list is empty")
        else:
            current_node = self.head
            while current_node:
                print(current_node.data)
                current_node = current_node.next

    def list_length(self):
        list_length = 0
        current_node = self.head
        while current_node:
            list_length += 1
            current_node = current_node.next
        return list_length


def main():
    linked_list = LinkedList()

    linked_list.prepend_node(1)
    linked_list.prepend_node(2)
    linked_list.prepend_node(3)
    linked_list.append_node(24)
    linked_list.append_node(25)
    linked_list.display()
    linked_list.reverse()
    linked_list.display()
    print(linked_list.search(1))
    linked_list.reverse()
    linked_list.display()
    print("Lenght of singly linked list is: " + str(linked_list.list_length()))


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

-1

My 2 cents

class Node:
    def __init__(self, value=None, next=None):
        self.value = value
        self.next = next

    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)


class LinkedList:
    def __init__(self):
        self.first = None
        self.last = None

    def add(self, x):
        current = Node(x, None)
        try:
            self.last.next = current
        except AttributeError:
            self.first = current
            self.last = current
        else:
            self.last = current

    def print_list(self):
        node = self.first
        while node:
            print node.value
            node = node.next

ll = LinkedList()
ll.add("1st")
ll.add("2nd")
ll.add("3rd")
ll.add("4th")
ll.add("5th")

ll.print_list()

# Result: 
# 1st
# 2nd
# 3rd
# 4th
# 5th
-1
enter code here
enter code here

class node:
    def __init__(self):
        self.data = None
        self.next = None
class linked_list:
    def __init__(self):
        self.cur_node = None
        self.head = None
    def add_node(self,data):
        new_node = node()
        if self.head == None:
            self.head = new_node
            self.cur_node = new_node
        new_node.data = data
        new_node.next = None
        self.cur_node.next = new_node
        self.cur_node = new_node
    def list_print(self):
        node = self.head
        while node:
            print (node.data)
            node = node.next
    def delete(self):
        node = self.head
        next_node = node.next
        del(node)
        self.head = next_node
a = linked_list()
a.add_node(1)
a.add_node(2)
a.add_node(3)
a.add_node(4)
a.delete()
a.list_print()
1
  • You answer an old question which has already has several well received answers and you don't give any explanation. What is the reason of posting your version? Does it have any benefit over the already presented solutions? Or any other added value? Please edit your answer and add some explanation to make your answer more complete.
    – honk
    Oct 30, 2014 at 17:14
-1

my double Linked List might be understandable to noobies. If you are familiar with DS in C, this is quite readable.

# LinkedList..

class node:
    def __init__(self):           ##Cluster of Nodes' properties 
        self.data=None
        self.next=None
        self.prev=None

class linkedList():
    def __init__(self):
        self.t = node()                    // for future use
        self.cur_node = node()             // current node
        self.start=node()

    def add(self,data):                          // appending the LL

        self.new_node = node()
        self.new_node.data=data
        if self.cur_node.data is None:          
            self.start=self.new_node               //For the 1st node only

        self.cur_node.next=self.new_node
        self.new_node.prev=self.cur_node
        self.cur_node=self.new_node


    def backward_display(self):                  //Displays LL backwards
        self.t=self.cur_node
        while self.t.data is not None:
            print(self.t.data)
            self.t=self.t.prev

    def forward_display(self):                   //Displays LL Forward
        self.t=self.start
        while self.t.data is not None:
            print(self.t.data)
            self.t=self.t.next
            if self.t.next is None:
                print(self.t.data)
                break

    def main(self):                          //This is kind of the main 
                                               function in C
        ch=0
        while ch is not 4:                    //Switch-case in C 
            ch=int(input("Enter your choice:"))
            if ch is 1:
                data=int(input("Enter data to be added:"))
                ll.add(data)
                ll.main()
            elif ch is 2:
                ll.forward_display()
                ll.main()
            elif ch is 3:
                ll.backward_display()
                ll.main()
            else:
                print("Program ends!!")
                return


ll=linkedList()
ll.main()

Though many more simplifications can be added to this code, I thought a raw implementation would me more grabbable.

-1

Current Implementation of Linked List in Python requires for creation of a separate class, called Node, so that they can be connected using a main Linked List class. In the provided implementation, the Linked List is created without defining a separate class for a node. Using the proposed implementation, Linked Lists are easier to understand and can be simply visualized using the print function.

class Linkedlist:
     def __init__(self):
         self.outer = None

     def add_outermost(self, dt):
         self.outer = [dt, self.outer]

     def add_innermost(self, dt):
         p = self.outer
         if not p:
             self.outer = [dt, None]
             return
         while p[1]:
             p = p[1]
         p[1] = [dt, None]

     def visualize(self):
         p = self.outer
         l = 'Linkedlist: '
         while p:
             l += (str(p[0])+'->')
             p = p[1]
         print(l + 'None')

 ll = Linkedlist()
 ll.add_innermost(8)
 ll.add_outermost(3)
 ll.add_outermost(5)
 ll.add_outermost(2)
 ll.add_innermost(7)
 print(ll.outer)
 ll.visualize()
0
-4

If you want to just create a simple liked list then refer this code

l=[1,[2,[3,[4,[5,[6,[7,[8,[9,[10]]]]]]]]]]

for visualize execution for this cod Visit http://www.pythontutor.com/visualize.html#mode=edit

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