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I gather there is (despite the lack of documentation) a way to set Git attributes globally; but I'm not clear where to place the necessary gitattributes file. The instructions say they belong in

$(prefix)/etc/gitattributes

But where is $(prefix)? In particular, where would it be for OS X (with Git in /usr/local/git/bin/git)? Alternately (or in addition) would ~/.gitattributes work?

  • 2
    In a Git context, "global" usually means "user-level"; in other words, a global setting affect all repositories for one specific user. In contrast, a system-wide setting affects all repositories for all users of a machine. Which level is of interest to you? User-level or system-wide? – jubobs Jan 19 '15 at 15:02
  • @Jubobs: Both (i.e., where to put one vs. the other; there also seem to be Git-version-specific locations as well, if one has more than one Git installed, as I do); but mostly for a user. – orome Jan 19 '15 at 15:03
  • For Windows see Where does git config --global get written to? – Michael Freidgeim May 8 '16 at 12:52
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Global vs. system-wide settings

There is some ambiguity in your question's terminology. In a Git context, "global" usually means "user-level"; in other words, a global setting affect all repositories for one specific user (the active one). In contrast, a system-wide setting affects all repositories for all users of a machine.

Repository-level gitattributes

(I'm only mentioning this for completeness.)

According to the relevant section of the Pro Git book,

If you wish to affect only a single repository (i.e., to assign attributes to files that are particular to one user’s workflow for that repository), then attributes should be placed in the $GIT_DIR/info/attributes file.

$GIT_DIR would typically expand to <path-to-repo-root-directory>/.git.

Global (user-level) gitattributes

According to the relevant section of the Pro Git book,

Attributes that should affect all repositories for a single user should be placed in a file specified by the core.attributesfile configuration option [...]. Its default value is $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/attributes. If $XDG_CONFIG_HOME is either not set or empty, $HOME/.config/git/attributes is used instead.

You can also run the following command,

git config --global core.attributesfile <path>

to point Git to a custom path <path> for your global gitattributes file, e.g. ~/.gitattributes.

System-wide gitattributes

According to the relevant section of the Pro Git book,

Attributes for all users on a system should be placed in the $(prefix)/etc/gitattributes file.

which naturally begs the question:

[...] But where is $(prefix)?

See What is $(prefix) on $(prefix)/etc/gitconfig? for an answer. Unless you've assigned prefix a custom, non-empty value, $(prefix) expands to nothing by default; therefore, your system-wide gitattributes file should reside in /etc/.

  • I have a /usr/local/git/etc directory which seems to be respected for gitattributes (at least by /usr/local/git/bin/git) but no /etc/git. There's also a ~/.config/git directory containing an ignore that GitHub seems to have generated). It's not clear to me how all of these fit together. – orome Jan 19 '15 at 17:51
  • @raxacoricofallapatorius The prefix used for compiling Git during the GitHub install may have been /usr/local/git/; if so, /usr/local/git/etc/gitattributes would be your system-wide gitattributes; see the System-wide gitattributes section in my answer. As for ~/.config/git, that's your global gitattributes; see the Global (user-level) gitattributes section in my answer. – jubobs Jan 19 '15 at 18:20
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    So (to check) any etc will be system wide (or at least system wide for a given Git) while the various $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/git/... or ~/.configs/git/.. won't matter (for gitignore either) if I've set core.attributesfile (or core.excludesfile) to something else. E.g., if I've set it to /.gitattributes (viz. ~/.gitignore) that's what will be used for my "global" (user-level) settings. – orome Jan 19 '15 at 19:11
  • @raxacoricofallapatorius If I understand you correctly, the answer is no. Repository-level settings have precedence over user-level ones, which have precedence over system-wide settings. – jubobs Jan 19 '15 at 19:29
  • Yes, and repo-level supersedes those. I was checking about "globals". – orome Jan 19 '15 at 19:41

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