6

I am not talking about the Parameterizing a fixture feature that allows a fixture to be run multiple times for a hard-coded set of parameters.

I have a LOT of tests that follow a pattern like:

httpcode = 401  # this is different per call
message = 'some message'  # this is different per call
url = 'some url'  # this is different per call


mock_req = mock.MagicMock(spec_set=urllib2.Request)
with mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.urlopen', autospec=True) as mock_urlopen, \
     mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.Request', autospec=True) as mock_request:
    mock_request.return_value = mock_req
    mock_urlopen.side_effect = urllib2.HTTPError(url, httpcode, message, {}, None)
    connection = MyClass()
    with pytest.raises(MyException):
        connection.some_function()  # this changes

Essentially, I have a class that's an API client, and includes custom, meaningful exceptions that wrap urllib2 errors in something API-specific. So, I have this one pattern - patching some methods, and setting side effects on one of them. I use it in probably a dozen different tests, and the only differences are the three variables which are used in part of the side_effect, and the method of MyClass() that I call.

Is there any way to make this a pytest fixture and pass in these variables?

16

You can use indirect fixture parametrization http://pytest.org/latest/example/parametrize.html#deferring-the-setup-of-parametrized-resources

@pytest.fixture()
def your_fixture(request):
    httpcode, message, url = request.param
    mock_req = mock.MagicMock(spec_set=urllib2.Request)
    with mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.urlopen', autospec=True) as mock_urlopen, \
         mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.Request', autospec=True) as mock_request:
        mock_request.return_value = mock_req
        mock_urlopen.side_effect = urllib2.HTTPError(url, httpcode, message, {}, None)
        connection = MyClass()
        with pytest.raises(MyException):
            connection.some_function()  # this changes


@pytest.mark.parametrize('your_fixture', [
    (403, 'some message', 'some url')
], indirect=True)
def test(your_fixture):
   ...

and your_fixture will run before test with desired params

  • I specifically said this isn't what I want... I don't want the fixture to be created multiple times, I just want to pass parameters into it. – Jason Antman Jan 30 '15 at 23:10
  • 1
    In my code fixture runs only once in test. In fact my code does the same as yours. The difference is in way in which parameters are passed. If you want to generate parameters inside test and then pass them to fixture - your code is only way to do it. If parameters are predefined in test, then my code also fits – Ilya Karpeev Feb 3 '15 at 15:02
6

I've done a bunch more research on this since posting my question, and the best I can come up with is:

Fixtures don't work this way. Just use a regular function, i.e.:

def my_fixture(httpcode, message, url):
    mock_req = mock.MagicMock(spec_set=urllib2.Request)
    with mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.urlopen', autospec=True) as mock_urlopen, \
         mock.patch('package.module.urllib2.Request', autospec=True) as mock_request:
        mock_request.return_value = mock_req
        mock_urlopen.side_effect = urllib2.HTTPError(url, httpcode, message, {}, None)
        connection = MyClass()
        return (connection, mock_request, mock_urlopen)

def test_something():
    connection, mock_req, mock_urlopen = my_fixture(401, 'some message', 'some url')
    with pytest.raises(MyException):
        connection.some_function()  # this changes
1

I know this is old, but maybe it helps someone who stumbles on this again

@pytest.fixture
def data_patcher(request):

    def get_output_test_data(filename, as_of_date=None):
         # a bunch of stuff to configure output
        return output

    def teardown():
        pass

    request.addfinalizer(teardown)

    return get_output_test_data

and then, inside the function:

with patch('function to patch', new=data_patcher):

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