1

what popular advance mathematics libraries for c++ are present out there, so that they can be used as a 1 stop solution and avoiding reinventing the wheel ?

closed as off-topic by Pradhan, lpapp, Quentin, dpassage, Shankar Damodaran Dec 27 '14 at 3:36

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Quentin, dpassage
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 12
    what kind of mathematics? – Anycorn May 10 '10 at 14:24
  • I did not specify because I end up having utilities in different fields, tensors, matrix algebra, functional analysis, calculus, group theories, interpolation, etc. – Egon May 10 '10 at 14:53
  • The rest seem reasonable, but it seems unlikely that there is a library out there for group theory... unless you mean cryptography... – Brian Postow May 10 '10 at 15:02
5

Check out GNU Scientific Library -- it's in C, but I use it all the time to avoid re-writing the Numerical Recipes code.

1

Intel's MKL (Math Kernel Library) is to be looked at especially if doing large scale matrix operations; it's C based, but should not really be an issue IMO.

Other than that, maybe the boost math library could be interesting as it is free. (but I have no experience with it, so YMMV).

Max.

  • 2
    Most of the MKL is based on the BLAS and LAPACK interfaces, so it is really Fortran-based, not C-based (it's obvious when you use it since matrices are assumed to be column-major and everything gets passed by pointer). It has C language bindings, though, which make it easier to use with C++. Boost uBLAS is only a BLAS implementation, but there are LAPACK bindings in the Boost incubation (I've never used them, so I can't make a recommendation on their use; I've generally just done the binding myself when I've needed to use LAPACK with uBLAS's matrix classes). – James McNellis May 10 '10 at 15:09
1

Like others have said, you will probably not find a single library to handle all of the areas you listed. For matrix algebra, I've heard good things about the Eigen C++ library from coworkers who are using it.

0

For commercial libraries, both NAG (Numerical Algorithms Group, http://www.nag.co.uk/) and IMSL ( http://www.vni.com/products/imsl/ ) are standards and provide industrial-strength numerical analysis algorithms.

0

look through the list and mix-and-match. You want very many things, unlikely any single package is going to do them all.

http://www.oonumerics.org/

octave is the only one that is going to be more or less comprehensive (functionality comparable/clone to Matlab)

http://www.mathias-michel.de/download/howto-octave-c++.ps

0

For group theory there is GAP.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.