85

I'm trying to get the key of the maximum value in the Dictionary<string, double> results.

This is what I have so far:

double max = results.Max(kvp => kvp.Value);
return results.Where(kvp => kvp.Value == max).Select(kvp => kvp.Key).First();

However, since this seems a little inefficient, I was wondering whether there was a better way to do this.

6
  • 2
    Is your dictionary supposed to be <double,string> or is that backwards?
    – Stephan
    May 10, 2010 at 19:19
  • 1
    You're right, it's <string,double>. Corrected.
    – Arda Xi
    May 10, 2010 at 19:25
  • why do you have a .Select after where? I'm not that saavy with LINQ, just curious Apr 3, 2013 at 6:23
  • 1
    @CoffeeAddict the .Select allows him to do "projection" Here, he is converting the KeyValuePair into just a Key. He could have left this part out and just wrote .First().Key; to get the key instead.
    – dss539
    Apr 3, 2013 at 15:55
  • @dss539 Ah, a bit late, but you're right. That would be more efficient.
    – Arda Xi
    Apr 16, 2013 at 22:39

10 Answers 10

155

I think this is the most readable O(n) answer using standard LINQ.

var max = results.Aggregate((l, r) => l.Value > r.Value ? l : r).Key;

edit: explanation for CoffeeAddict

Aggregate is the LINQ name for the commonly known functional concept Fold

It loops over each element of the set and applies whatever function you provide. Here, the function I provide is a comparison function that returns the bigger value. While looping, Aggregate remembers the return result from the last time it called my function. It feeds this into my comparison function as variable l. The variable r is the currently selected element.

So after aggregate has looped over the entire set, it returns the result from the very last time it called my comparison function. Then I read the .Key member from it because I know it's a dictionary entry

Here is a different way to look at it [I don't guarantee that this compiles ;) ]

var l = results[0];
for(int i=1; i<results.Count(); ++i)
{
    var r = results[i];
    if(r.Value > l.Value)
        l = r;        
}
var max = l.Key;
1
  • 3
    +1 dss539: I had an itch in my brain, like there should have been some way to do it with LINQ. Nice!
    – JMarsch
    May 11, 2010 at 15:32
45

After reading various suggestions, I decided to benchmark them and share the results.

The code tested:

// TEST 1

for (int i = 0; i < 999999; i++)
{
  KeyValuePair<GameMove, int> bestMove1 = possibleMoves.First();
  foreach (KeyValuePair<GameMove, int> move in possibleMoves)
  {
    if (move.Value > bestMove1.Value) bestMove1 = move;
  }
}

// TEST 2

for (int i = 0; i < 999999; i++)
{
  KeyValuePair<GameMove, int> bestMove2 = possibleMoves.Aggregate((a, b) => a.Value > b.Value ? a : b);
}

// TEST 3

for (int i = 0; i < 999999; i++)
{
  KeyValuePair<GameMove, int> bestMove3 = (from move in possibleMoves orderby move.Value descending select move).First();
}

// TEST 4

for (int i = 0; i < 999999; i++)
{
  KeyValuePair<GameMove, int> bestMove4 = possibleMoves.OrderByDescending(entry => entry.Value).First();
}

The results:

Average Seconds Test 1 = 2.6
Average Seconds Test 2 = 4.4
Average Seconds Test 3 = 11.2
Average Seconds Test 4 = 11.2

This is just to give an idea of their relative performance.

If your optimizing 'foreach' is fastest, but LINQ is compact and flexible.

2
  • 7
    +1 for taking the time to bench it. How are test 3 and 4 any different? They generate the same MSIL don't they?
    – dss539
    Feb 28, 2011 at 19:08
  • 1
    I just checked and you are correct, test 3 and 4 produce the same MSIL code :)
    – WhoIsRich
    Feb 28, 2011 at 20:29
12

Maybe this isn't a good use for LINQ. I see 2 full scans of the dictionary using the LINQ solution (1 to get the max, then another to find the kvp to return the string.

You could do it in 1 pass with an "old fashioned" foreach:


KeyValuePair<string, double> max = new KeyValuePair<string, double>(); 
foreach (var kvp in results)
{
  if (kvp.Value > max.Value)
    max = kvp;
}
return max.Key;

4
  • 1
    I know it leads to the same result but I have found this to be more readable: var max = default(KeyValuePair<string, double>); May 10, 2010 at 19:59
  • 2
    You are right; the OP had an O(2n) algorithm using see. See my answer for a O(n) using LINQ.
    – dss539
    May 10, 2010 at 20:11
  • 4
    +1 for reducing the iterations. You should probably initialize max.Value with double.MinValue to ensure you find a max even if it is a negative. May 10, 2010 at 20:14
  • keep it simple :) classic search algoritims are always available. No need to think it will be hard. May 22, 2012 at 8:23
11

You can sort dictionary by using OrderBy (for find min value) or OrderByDescending (for max value) then get first element. It also help when you need find second max/min element

Get dictionary key by max value:

double min = results.OrderByDescending(x => x.Value).First().Key;

Get dictionary key by min value:

double min = results.OrderBy(x => x.Value).First().Key;

Get dictionary key by second max value:

double min = results.OrderByDescending(x => x.Value).Skip(1).First().Key;

Get dictionary key by second min value:

double min = results.OrderBy(x => x.Value).Skip(1).First().Key;
2
  • 1
    It seems that OrderBy do more computation than what really is needed.
    – Babak.Abad
    Jul 1, 2019 at 22:27
  • Yes. Sorting is O(n * log (n)) and min/max element is O(n). Jul 23, 2019 at 13:41
7

This is a fast method. It is O(n), which is optimal. The only problem I see is that it iterates over the dictionary twice instead of just once.

You can do it iterating over the dictionary once by using MaxBy from morelinq.

results.MaxBy(kvp => kvp.Value).Key;
1
  • Aggregate can also be used for the same effect.
    – dss539
    May 10, 2010 at 20:13
3

Little extension method:

public static KeyValuePair<K, V> GetMaxValuePair<K,V>(this Dictionary<K, V> source)
    where V : IComparable
{
    KeyValuePair<K, V> maxPair = source.First();
    foreach (KeyValuePair<K, V> pair in source)
    {
        if (pair.Value.CompareTo(maxPair.Value) > 0)
            maxPair = pair;
    }
    return maxPair;
}

Then:

int keyOfMax = myDictionary.GetMaxValuePair().Key;

3

Check These out:

result.Where(x=>x.Value==result.Values.Max()).Select(x=>x.Key).ToList()

0

How about doing it in parallel using Interlocked.Exchange for thread safety :) Keep in mind that Interlocked.Exchange will only work with a reference type.(i.e. a struct or key value pair (unless wrapped in a class) will not work to hold the max value.

Here's an example from my own code:

//Parallel O(n) solution for finding max kvp in a dictionary...
ClassificationResult maxValue = new ClassificationResult(-1,-1,double.MinValue);
Parallel.ForEach(pTotals, pTotal =>
{
    if(pTotal.Value > maxValue.score)
    {
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref maxValue, new                
            ClassificationResult(mhSet.sequenceId,pTotal.Key,pTotal.Value)); 
    }
});

EDIT (Updated code to avoid possible race condition above):

Here's a more robust pattern which also shows selecting a min value in parallel. I think this addresses the concerns mentioned in the comments below regarding a possible race condition:

int minVal = int.MaxValue;
Parallel.ForEach(dictionary.Values, curVal =>
{
  int oldVal = Volatile.Read(ref minVal);
  //val can equal anything but the oldVal
  int val = ~oldVal;

  //Keep trying the atomic update until we are sure that either:
  //1. CompareExchange successfully changed the value.
  //2. Another thread has updated minVal with a smaller number than curVal.
  //   (in the case of #2, the update is no longer needed)
  while (oldval > curVal && oldval != val)
  {
    val = oldval;
    oldval = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref minVal, curVal, oldval);
  }
});
3
  • I'm pretty sure this example has a race condition. Between the time you compare the max value against the current, and swap them, another thread could have done the same thing and already swapped a better value into maxValue that will then be clobbered by the current thread's worse value.
    – dss539
    May 27, 2015 at 15:14
  • I have updated the answer with a more robust solution which I think addresses the potential race condition.
    – Jake Drew
    May 27, 2015 at 19:50
  • I think you're right. That's how I was thinking of resolving the race. I do wonder if a read-write lock would have better performance. +1 for the update
    – dss539
    May 28, 2015 at 0:39
0

My version based off the current Enumerable.Max implementation with an optional comparer:

    public static TSource MaxValue<TSource, TConversionResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TConversionResult> function, IComparer<TConversionResult> comparer = null)
    {
        comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<TConversionResult>.Default;
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(source));

        TSource max = default;
        TConversionResult maxFx = default;
        if ( (object)maxFx == null) //nullable stuff
        {
            foreach (var x in source)
            {
                var fx = function(x);
                if (fx == null || (maxFx != null && comparer.Compare(fx, maxFx) <= 0)) continue;
                maxFx = fx;
                max = x;
            }
            return max;
        }

        //valuetypes
        var notFirst = false;
        foreach (var x in source) 
        {
            var fx = function(x);
            if (notFirst)
            {
                if (comparer.Compare(fx, maxFx) <= 0) continue;
                maxFx = fx;
                max = x;
            }
            else
            {
                maxFx = fx;
                max = x;
                notFirst = true;
            }
        }
        if (notFirst)
            return max;
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Sequence contains no elements");
    }

Example usage:

    class Wrapper
    {
        public int Value { get; set; }    
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMaxValue()
    {
        var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, Wrapper>();
        for (var i = 0; i < 19; i++)
        {
            dictionary[$"s:{i}"] = new Wrapper{Value = (i % 10) * 10 } ;
        }

        var m = dictionary.Keys.MaxValue(x => dictionary[x].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(m, "s:9");
    }
-4

I think using the standard LINQ Libraries this is as fast as you can go.

0

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