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How do I get Xcode to build an OS X app in release mode? I can only seem to find instructions for earlier versions and none of the screenshots match. I didn't see anything when I put "release" into the help menu's search.

3 Answers 3

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In Xcode 6 - 10:

Choose Product -> Scheme -> Edit Scheme. Change the Build Configuration under the Info tab.

Shortcut: hold Alt and click the run button .


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    Man, never would have discovered that.
    – drewish
    Commented Jan 21, 2015 at 4:57
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    @drewish The product icon on the left top corner (on the right of "Run" and "Stop" button) also has a shortcut for "Edit Scheme".
    – ljk321
    Commented Jan 21, 2015 at 5:01
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    After looking at the scheme, the other short cut to get a release build is to profile the app.
    – drewish
    Commented Jan 21, 2015 at 22:15
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    I don't see where the actual .app files end up.
    – Wolfr
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 11:43
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    You should use "archive" to get the actual .app.
    – ljk321
    Commented Nov 6, 2016 at 2:11
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When you want to generate a release build, choose Product -> Archive. That is a Release build. Now you can export as a Mac OS X app.

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The easiest way with a project that has the default set up for schemes is just to do Product -> Build For -> Profiling.

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    Nice. Then is there an easy way to run it, without the profiler also starting up?
    – mm2001
    Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 19:23
  • I would like to know this too. I don't want the profiler to start up. Commented Mar 9, 2016 at 20:26
  • This is exactly what I needed! If you want to run as well as build, use the other answer by skyline75489. Commented Apr 1, 2016 at 9:44
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    Profiling should have nothing to do with preparing a release version of the app.
    – Eric Gopak
    Commented Oct 4, 2016 at 15:33

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