16

I'm trying to plot many data using subplots and I'm NOT in trouble but I'm wondering if there is a convenience method to do this.

below is the sample code.

import numpy as np    
import math 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

quantities=["sam_mvir","mvir","rvir","rs","vrms","vmax"
,"jx","jy","jz","spin","m200b","m200c","m500c","m2500c"
,"xoff","voff","btoc","ctoa","ax","ay","az"]

# len(quantities) = 21, just to make the second loop expression 
# shorter in this post.

ncol = 5
nrow = math.ceil(21 / ncol)

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows = nrow, ncols=ncol, figsize=(8,6))

for i in range(nrow):
    for j in range(((21-i*5)>5)*5 + ((21-i*5)<5)*(21%5)):
        axes[i, j].plot(tree[quantities[i*ncol + j]]) 
        axes[i, j].set_title(quantities[i*ncol + j])

This code loops over a 2D array of subplots and stops at the 21st plot leaving 4 panels empty. My question is that, is there any built-in method to do this task? For example, make 2D subplot array and "flatten" the array into 1D then loop over 1D array through 0 to 20.

The expression in the second range() is very ugly. I don't think I'm going to use this code. I think the trivial way is to count the number of plots and break if count > 21. But I just wonder if there is a better (or fancy) way.

2 Answers 2

21

subplots returns an ndarray of axes objects, you can just flatten or ravel it:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows = nrow, ncols=ncol, figsize=(8,6))
for ax in axes.flatten()[:20]:
    # do stuff to ax
16

Rather than creating your subplots in advance using plt.subplots, just create them as you go using plt.subplot(nrows, ncols, number). The small example below shows how to do it. It's created a 3x3 array of plots and only plotted the first 6.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

nrows, ncols = 3, 3

x = np.linspace(0,10,100)

fig = plt.figure()    
for i in range(1,7):
    ax = fig.add_subplot(nrows, ncols, i)
    ax.plot(x, x**i)

plt.show()

Example

You could fill the final three in of course by doing plt.subplot(nrows, ncols, i) but not calling any plotting in there (if that's what you wanted).

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

nrows, ncols = 3, 3

x = np.linspace(0,10,100)

fig = plt.figure()    
for i in range(1,10):
    ax = fig.add_subplot(nrows, ncols, i)
    if i < 7:
        ax.plot(x, x**i)

plt.show()

Example 2

You may also like the look of GridSpec.

3
  • Ah..... That's why I could find anything that seems to answer my question...! The question was just invalid. Thanks a lot! That was quick. Jan 21, 2015 at 15:45
  • If you are going to do it this way you should at least use fig.add_subplot to make sure that the state machine does not fight back.
    – tacaswell
    Jan 22, 2015 at 5:52
  • If you want to get nicely laid out graphs, use fig.tight_layout().
    – Tom Pohl
    Mar 1, 2023 at 13:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.